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Title: Genotoxicity of alpha particles in human embryonic skin fibroblasts

Abstract

Cell inactivation and induced mutation frequencies at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus have been measured in cultured human fibroblasts (GM10) exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 238/ Pu and 250 kVp X rays. The survival curves resulting from exposure to ..cap alpha.. particles are exponential. The mean lethal dose, D/sub 0/, is approximately 1.3 Gy for X rays and 0.25 Gy for ..cap alpha.. particles. As a function of radiation dose, mutation induction at the HGPRT locus was linear for ..cap alpha.. particles whereas the X-ray-induced mutation data were better fitted by a quadratic function. When mutation frequencies were plotted against the log of survival, mutation frequency at a given survival level was greater in cells exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles than to X rays.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM
OSTI Identifier:
6095645
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiat. Res.; (United States); Journal Volume: 100:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; ALPHA PARTICLES; RBE; CELL KILLING; RADIOINDUCTION; FIBROBLASTS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; MUTATIONS; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; EMBRYONIC CELLS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; HYPOXANTHINE PHOSPHORIBOSYLTRANSFERASE; MAN; MUTATION FREQUENCY; PLUTONIUM 238; SKIN; SURVIVAL CURVES; X RADIATION; ACTINIDE ISOTOPES; ACTINIDE NUCLEI; ALPHA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BODY; CHARGED PARTICLES; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; DATA; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; ENZYMES; EVEN-EVEN NUCLEI; GLYCOSYL TRANSFERASES; HEAVY NUCLEI; INFORMATION; IONIZING RADIATIONS; ISOTOPES; MAMMALS; NUCLEI; NUMERICAL DATA; ORGANS; PENTOSYL TRANSFERASES; PLUTONIUM ISOTOPES; PRIMATES; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; RADIOISOTOPES; SOMATIC CELLS; TRANSFERASES; VERTEBRATES; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 560121* - Radiation Effects on Cells- External Source- (-1987); 550401 - Genetics- Tracer Techniques; 550301 - Cytology- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Chen, D.J., Strniste, G.F., and Tokita, N. Genotoxicity of alpha particles in human embryonic skin fibroblasts. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.2307/3576353.
Chen, D.J., Strniste, G.F., & Tokita, N. Genotoxicity of alpha particles in human embryonic skin fibroblasts. United States. doi:10.2307/3576353.
Chen, D.J., Strniste, G.F., and Tokita, N. 1984. "Genotoxicity of alpha particles in human embryonic skin fibroblasts". United States. doi:10.2307/3576353.
@article{osti_6095645,
title = {Genotoxicity of alpha particles in human embryonic skin fibroblasts},
author = {Chen, D.J. and Strniste, G.F. and Tokita, N.},
abstractNote = {Cell inactivation and induced mutation frequencies at the hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) locus have been measured in cultured human fibroblasts (GM10) exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles from /sup 238/ Pu and 250 kVp X rays. The survival curves resulting from exposure to ..cap alpha.. particles are exponential. The mean lethal dose, D/sub 0/, is approximately 1.3 Gy for X rays and 0.25 Gy for ..cap alpha.. particles. As a function of radiation dose, mutation induction at the HGPRT locus was linear for ..cap alpha.. particles whereas the X-ray-induced mutation data were better fitted by a quadratic function. When mutation frequencies were plotted against the log of survival, mutation frequency at a given survival level was greater in cells exposed to ..cap alpha.. particles than to X rays.},
doi = {10.2307/3576353},
journal = {Radiat. Res.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 100:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month =
}
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