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Title: A modeling study of GaN growth by MOVPE

Abstract

A model for the growth of gallium nitride in a vertical metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy reactor is presented. For a mixture of non-dilute gases, the flow temperature and concentration profiles are predicted. The results show that the growth of GaN epilayers is through an intermediate adduct of TMG and ammonia. Growth rates are predicted based on simple reaction mechanisms and compared with those obtained experimentally. Loss of adduct species due to polymerization leads to lowering in growth rate. An attempt to quantify loss of reacting species is made based on experimentally observed growth rates.

Authors:
;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering
  2. Advanced Technology Materials, Danbury, CT (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
394961
Report Number(s):
CONF-951155-
ISBN 1-55899-298-7; TRN: IM9648%%38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Fall meeting of the Materials Research Society (MRS), Boston, MA (United States), 27 Nov - 1 Dec 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1996; Related Information: Is Part Of Gallium nitride and related materials; Ponce, F.A. [ed.] [Xerox Palo Alto Research Center, CA (United States)]; Dupuis, R.D. [ed.] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)]; Nakamura, S. [ed.] [Nichia Chemical Industries, Tokushima (Japan)]; Edmond, J.A. [ed.] [Cree Research, Inc., Durham, NC (United States)]; PB: 993 p.; Materials Research Society symposium proceedings, Volume 395
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 42 ENGINEERING NOT INCLUDED IN OTHER CATEGORIES; GALLIUM NITRIDES; CHEMICAL VAPOR DEPOSITION; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; SEMICONDUCTOR MATERIALS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; HEAT TRANSFER; GAS FLOW; MASS TRANSFER; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; HYDROGEN; AMMONIA; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS

Citation Formats

Safvi, S.A., Kuech, T.F., Redwing, J.M., and Tischler, M.A.. A modeling study of GaN growth by MOVPE. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Safvi, S.A., Kuech, T.F., Redwing, J.M., & Tischler, M.A.. A modeling study of GaN growth by MOVPE. United States.
Safvi, S.A., Kuech, T.F., Redwing, J.M., and Tischler, M.A.. 1996. "A modeling study of GaN growth by MOVPE". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_394961,
title = {A modeling study of GaN growth by MOVPE},
author = {Safvi, S.A. and Kuech, T.F. and Redwing, J.M. and Tischler, M.A.},
abstractNote = {A model for the growth of gallium nitride in a vertical metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy reactor is presented. For a mixture of non-dilute gases, the flow temperature and concentration profiles are predicted. The results show that the growth of GaN epilayers is through an intermediate adduct of TMG and ammonia. Growth rates are predicted based on simple reaction mechanisms and compared with those obtained experimentally. Loss of adduct species due to polymerization leads to lowering in growth rate. An attempt to quantify loss of reacting species is made based on experimentally observed growth rates.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1996,
month =
}

Conference:
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  • A comparative study of two different MOVPE reactors used for GaN growth is presented. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to determine common gas phase and fluid flow behaviors within these reactors. This paper focuses on the common thermal fluid features of these two MOVPE reactors with different geometries and operating pressures that can grow device-quality GaN-based materials. The study clearly shows that several growth conditions must be achieved in order to grow high quality GaN materials. The high-temperature gas flow zone must be limited to a very thin flow sheet above the susceptor, while the bulk gas phase temperaturemore » must be very low to prevent extensive pre-deposition reactions. These conditions lead to higher growth rates and improved material quality. A certain range of gas flow velocity inside the high-temperature gas flow zone is also required in order to minimize the residence time and improve the growth uniformity. These conditions can be achieved by the use of either a novel reactor structure such as a two-flow approach or by specific flow conditions. The quantitative ranges of flow velocities, gas phase temperature, and residence time required in these reactors to achieve high quality material and uniform growth are given.« less
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  • Growth of high quality InP and InGaAs using the less hazardous liquid group V precursors, TBAs and TBP has been achieved. A systematic study compares the quality of InP and InGaAs epitaxial layers grown by low-pressure organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) using TMG and TEG trimethylindium (TMIn), phosphine (PH{sub 3}), arsino (AsH{sub 3}) and tetriarybutylophosphine (TBP) and tertriarybutylarsin (TBAs) sources. High quality InP Layers are obtained with both phosphorus sources for growth at high V/III ratio and at low temperatures with the TBP, TBAs sources than with the phosphine and arsine sources.
  • InP substrates form the starting point for a wide variety of semiconductor devices. The surface morphology produced during epitaxy depends critically on the starting substrate. We evaluated (1 0 0)-oriented InP wafers from three different vendors by growing thick (5 mu m) lattice-matched epilayers of InP, Gain As, and AlInAs. We assessed the surfaces with differential interference contrast microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Wafers with near singular (1 0 0) orientations produced inferior surfaces in general. Vicinal substrates with small misorientations improved the epitaxial surface for InP dramatically, reducing the density of macroscopic defects while maintaining a low RMS roughness.more » GaInAs and AlInAs epitaxy step-bunched forming undulations along the miscut direction. Sulfur-doped wafers were considered for singular (1 0 0) and for 0.2 degrees misorientation toward (1 1 0). We found that mound defects observed for InP and GaInAs layers on iron-doped singular wafers were absent for singular sulfur-doped wafers. These observations support the conclusion that dislocation termination at the surface and expansion of the step spiral lead to the macroscopic defects observed.« less
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