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Title: Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon

Abstract

A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.

Inventors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of California
OSTI Identifier:
379937
Patent Number(s):
US 5,565,377/A/
Application Number:
PAN: 8-329,959
Assignee:
Univ. of California, Oakland, CA (United States) PTO; SCA: 360601; 360602; PA: EDB-96:150793; SN: 96001674298
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: 15 Oct 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; SILICON; CRYSTAL DOPING; MELTING; AMBIENT TEMPERATURE; LASER RADIATION; SURFACE TREATMENTS; MORPHOLOGY

Citation Formats

Weiner, K.H., and Sigmon, T.W. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Weiner, K.H., & Sigmon, T.W. Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon. United States.
Weiner, K.H., and Sigmon, T.W. Tue . "Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_379937,
title = {Process for forming retrograde profiles in silicon},
author = {Weiner, K.H. and Sigmon, T.W.},
abstractNote = {A process is disclosed for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selected temperature.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Oct 15 00:00:00 EDT 1996},
month = {Tue Oct 15 00:00:00 EDT 1996}
}
  • A process for forming retrograde and oscillatory profiles in crystalline and polycrystalline silicon. The process consisting of introducing an n- or p-type dopant into the silicon, or using prior doped silicon, then exposing the silicon to multiple pulses of a high-intensity laser or other appropriate energy source that melts the silicon for short time duration. Depending on the number of laser pulses directed at the silicon, retrograde profiles with peak/surface dopant concentrations which vary from 1-1e4 are produced. The laser treatment can be performed in air or in vacuum, with the silicon at room temperature or heated to a selectedmore » temperature.« less
  • Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures are disclosed to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gases in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background;more » chemical reaction chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.« less
  • Fabrication and use of porous silicon structures to increase surface area of heated reaction chambers, electrophoresis devices, and thermopneumatic sensor-actuators, chemical preconcentrates, and filtering or control flow devices. In particular, such high surface area or specific pore size porous silicon structures will be useful in significantly augmenting the adsorption, vaporization, desorption, condensation and flow of liquids and gasses in applications that use such processes on a miniature scale. Examples that will benefit from a high surface area, porous silicon structure include sample preconcentrators that are designed to adsorb and subsequently desorb specific chemical species from a sample background; chemical reactionmore » chambers with enhanced surface reaction rates; and sensor-actuator chamber devices with increased pressure for thermopneumatic actuation of integrated membranes. Examples that benefit from specific pore sized porous silicon are chemical/biological filters and thermally-activated flow devices with active or adjacent surfaces such as electrodes or heaters.« less
  • A selective oxidation process for producing a semiconductor device comprises the step of depositing a silicon oxynitride layer directly on a silicon substrate by a plasma chemical vapor deposition method. After a selective oxidation of the silicon substrate, the silicon oxynitride layer is removed.
  • Silicon carbide films and microcomponents are grown on silicon substrates at surface temperatures between 900 K and 1700 K via C{sub 60} precursors in a hydrogen-free environment. Selective crystalline silicon carbide growth can be achieved on patterned silicon-silicon oxide samples. Patterned SiC films are produced by making use of the high reaction probability of C{sub 60} with silicon at surface temperatures greater than 900 K and the negligible reaction probability for C{sub 60} on silicon dioxide at surface temperatures less than 1250 K. 5 figs.