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Title: Proton irradiation effects on advanced digital and microwave III-V components

Abstract

A wide range of advanced III-V components suitable for use in high-speed satellite communication systems were evaluated for displacement damage and single-event effects in high-energy, high-fluence proton environments. Transistors and integrated circuits (both digital and MMIC) were irradiated with protons at energies from 41 to 197 MeV and at fluences from 10{sup 10} to 2 {times} 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2}. Large soft-error rates were measured for digital GaAs MESFET (3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day) and heterojunction bipolar circuits (10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day). No transient signals were detected from MMIC circuits. The largest degradation in transistor response caused by displacement damage was observed for 1.0-{mu}m depletion- and enhancement-mode MESFET transistors. Shorter gate length MESFET transistors and HEMT transistors exhibited less displacement-induced damage. These results show that memory-intensive GaAs digital circuits may result in significant system degradation due to single-event upset in natural and man-made space environments. However, displacement damage effects should not be a limiting factor for fluence levels up to 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2} [equivalent to total doses in excess of 10 Mrad(GaAs)].

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;  [1];  [2]
  1. Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Indiana University Cyclotron Facility, Bloomington, IN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
10182871
Report Number(s):
SAND-94-0205C; CONF-940726-14
ON: DE94018742; TRN: 94:008391
DOE Contract Number:
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 31. annual international nuclear and space radiation effects conference,Tucson, AZ (United States),18-22 Jul 1994; Other Information: PBD: [1994]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; SATELLITES; ELECTRONIC CIRCUITS; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; IRRADIATION; RADIATION EFFECTS; MICROWAVE EQUIPMENT; 440200; 663620; RADIATION EFFECTS ON INSTRUMENT COMPONENTS, INSTRUMENTS, OR ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS; PHYSICS OF RADIATIONS OTHER THAN NEUTRONS

Citation Formats

Hash, G.L., Schwank, J.R., Shaneyfelt, M.R., Sandoval, C.E., Connors, M.P., Sheridan, T.J., Sexton, F.W., Slayton, E.M., Heise, J.A., and Foster, C.. Proton irradiation effects on advanced digital and microwave III-V components. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Hash, G.L., Schwank, J.R., Shaneyfelt, M.R., Sandoval, C.E., Connors, M.P., Sheridan, T.J., Sexton, F.W., Slayton, E.M., Heise, J.A., & Foster, C.. Proton irradiation effects on advanced digital and microwave III-V components. United States.
Hash, G.L., Schwank, J.R., Shaneyfelt, M.R., Sandoval, C.E., Connors, M.P., Sheridan, T.J., Sexton, F.W., Slayton, E.M., Heise, J.A., and Foster, C.. Thu . "Proton irradiation effects on advanced digital and microwave III-V components". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10182871.
@article{osti_10182871,
title = {Proton irradiation effects on advanced digital and microwave III-V components},
author = {Hash, G.L. and Schwank, J.R. and Shaneyfelt, M.R. and Sandoval, C.E. and Connors, M.P. and Sheridan, T.J. and Sexton, F.W. and Slayton, E.M. and Heise, J.A. and Foster, C.},
abstractNote = {A wide range of advanced III-V components suitable for use in high-speed satellite communication systems were evaluated for displacement damage and single-event effects in high-energy, high-fluence proton environments. Transistors and integrated circuits (both digital and MMIC) were irradiated with protons at energies from 41 to 197 MeV and at fluences from 10{sup 10} to 2 {times} 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2}. Large soft-error rates were measured for digital GaAs MESFET (3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day) and heterojunction bipolar circuits (10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day). No transient signals were detected from MMIC circuits. The largest degradation in transistor response caused by displacement damage was observed for 1.0-{mu}m depletion- and enhancement-mode MESFET transistors. Shorter gate length MESFET transistors and HEMT transistors exhibited less displacement-induced damage. These results show that memory-intensive GaAs digital circuits may result in significant system degradation due to single-event upset in natural and man-made space environments. However, displacement damage effects should not be a limiting factor for fluence levels up to 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2} [equivalent to total doses in excess of 10 Mrad(GaAs)].},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994},
month = {Thu Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994}
}

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  • A wide range of advanced III-V components suitable for use in high-speed satellite communication systems were evaluated for displacement damage and single-event effects in high-energy, high-fluence proton environments. Transistors and integrated circuits (both digital and MMIC) were irradiated with protons at energies from 41 to 197 MeV and at fluences from 10[sup 10] to 2 [times] 10[sup 14] protons/cm[sup 2]. Large soft-error rates were measured for digital GaAs MESFET (3 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] errors/bit-day) and heterojunction bipolar circuits (10[sup [minus]5] errors/bit-day). No transient signals were detected from MMIC circuits. The largest degradation in transistor response caused by displacement damage wasmore » observed for 1.0-[mu]m depletion- and enhancement-mode MESFET transistors. Shorter gate length MESFET transistors and HEMT transistors exhibited less displacement-induced damage. These results show that memory-intensive GaAs digital circuits may result in significant system degradation due to single-event upset in natural and man-made space environments. However, displacement damage effects should not be a limiting factor for fluence levels up to 10[sup 14] protons/cm[sup 2] [equivalent to total doses in excess of 10 Mrad (GaAs)].« less
  • Abstract not provided.
  • Etch rates up to 7000{angstrom}/min for InP and 3500{angstrom}/min for GaAs are obtained for high microwave power (1000W) CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2}/Ar Electron Cyclotron Resonance plasma etching. Preferential loss of the group V element leads to nonstoichiometric, unacceptably rough surfaces on In-based binary semiconductors at microwave powers {ge}400W, regardless of plasma composition. Both Ga- and Al-based materials retain smooth, stoichiometric surfaces even at I000W, but the rates are still much slower than for C1{sub 2} plasma chemistries. The results suggest that CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} plasmas are not well suited to ECR systems operating at high powers.
  • In order to study the effects of microwaves on chemical reactions equipment was designed to acquire in-situ vibrational spectra of sol-gel components as they are irradiated with microwaves. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy were used. A low temperature (10K) FTIR cell was used to trap samples in an argon matrix at 10{sup -7} Torr. For the liquid samples no differences were seen in spectra of irradiated and nonirradiated samples, but the argon matrix isolation technique showed dramatic differences.
  • This proceedings volume results from a Material Research Society symposium designed to cover the spectrum of activity in the III-V compound semiconductor arena. This ranges from the growth of epitaxial layers by any one of a number of different techniques, to the processing of these layers using wet and dry etching, ohmic contact or dielectric deposition, lithographic patterning, implantation, annealing or gate metal deposition, and finally to the operation of the completed device. Invited talks on many of these subjects are given first in each section, followed by contributed and poster papers.