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Title: High-Resolution Field Effect Sensing of Ferroelectric Charges

Abstract

Nanoscale manipulation of surface charges and their imaging are essential for understanding local electronic behaviors of polar materials and advanced electronic devices. Electrostatic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy have been extensively used to probe and image local surface charges responsible for electrodynamics and transport phenomena. However, they rely on the weak electric force modulation of cantilever that limits both spatial and temporal resolutions. Here we present a field effect transistor embedded probe that can directly image surface charges on a length scale of 25 nm and a time scale of less than 125 {micro}s. On the basis of the calculation of net surface charges in a 25 nm diameter ferroelectric domain, we could estimate the charge density resolution to be as low as 0.08 {micro}C/cm{sup 2}, which is equivalent to 1/20 electron per nanometer square at room temperature.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Samsung Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Korea
  2. Kookmin University
  3. Max-Planck-Institut fur Mikrostrukturphysik, Germany
  4. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1015684
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nature Nanotechnology; Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; CHARGE DENSITY; ELECTRODYNAMICS; ELECTRONS; ELECTROSTATICS; FIELD EFFECT TRANSISTORS; MICROSCOPY; MODULATION; PROBES; RESOLUTION; TRANSPORT

Citation Formats

Ko, Hyoungsoo, Ryu, Kyunghee, Park, Hongsik, Park, Chulmin, Jeon, Daeyoung, Kim, Yong Kwan, Jung, Juhwan, Min, Dong-Ki, Kim, Yunseok, Lee, Ho Nyung, Park, Yoondong, Shin, Hyunjung, and Hong, Seungbum. High-Resolution Field Effect Sensing of Ferroelectric Charges. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.1021/nl103372a.
Ko, Hyoungsoo, Ryu, Kyunghee, Park, Hongsik, Park, Chulmin, Jeon, Daeyoung, Kim, Yong Kwan, Jung, Juhwan, Min, Dong-Ki, Kim, Yunseok, Lee, Ho Nyung, Park, Yoondong, Shin, Hyunjung, & Hong, Seungbum. High-Resolution Field Effect Sensing of Ferroelectric Charges. United States. doi:10.1021/nl103372a.
Ko, Hyoungsoo, Ryu, Kyunghee, Park, Hongsik, Park, Chulmin, Jeon, Daeyoung, Kim, Yong Kwan, Jung, Juhwan, Min, Dong-Ki, Kim, Yunseok, Lee, Ho Nyung, Park, Yoondong, Shin, Hyunjung, and Hong, Seungbum. 2011. "High-Resolution Field Effect Sensing of Ferroelectric Charges". United States. doi:10.1021/nl103372a.
@article{osti_1015684,
title = {High-Resolution Field Effect Sensing of Ferroelectric Charges},
author = {Ko, Hyoungsoo and Ryu, Kyunghee and Park, Hongsik and Park, Chulmin and Jeon, Daeyoung and Kim, Yong Kwan and Jung, Juhwan and Min, Dong-Ki and Kim, Yunseok and Lee, Ho Nyung and Park, Yoondong and Shin, Hyunjung and Hong, Seungbum},
abstractNote = {Nanoscale manipulation of surface charges and their imaging are essential for understanding local electronic behaviors of polar materials and advanced electronic devices. Electrostatic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy have been extensively used to probe and image local surface charges responsible for electrodynamics and transport phenomena. However, they rely on the weak electric force modulation of cantilever that limits both spatial and temporal resolutions. Here we present a field effect transistor embedded probe that can directly image surface charges on a length scale of 25 nm and a time scale of less than 125 {micro}s. On the basis of the calculation of net surface charges in a 25 nm diameter ferroelectric domain, we could estimate the charge density resolution to be as low as 0.08 {micro}C/cm{sup 2}, which is equivalent to 1/20 electron per nanometer square at room temperature.},
doi = {10.1021/nl103372a},
journal = {Nature Nanotechnology},
number = 4,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = 2011,
month = 1
}
  • Nanoscale manipulation of surface charges and their imaging are essential for understanding local electronic behaviors of polar materials and advanced electronic devices. Electrostatic force microscopy and Kelvin probe force microscopy have been extensively used to probe and image local surface charges responsible for electrodynamics and transport phenomena. However, they rely on the weak electric force modulation of cantilever that limits both spatial and temporal resolutions. Here we present a field effect transistor embedded probe that can directly image surface charges on a length scale of 25 nm and a time scale of less than 125 {micro}s. On the basis ofmore » the calculation of net surface charges in a 25 nm diameter ferroelectric domain, we could estimate the charge density resolution to be as low as 0.08 {micro}C/cm{sup 2}, which is equivalent to 1/20 electron per nanometer square at room temperature.« less
  • W415 is a chiral smectic compound with a remarkably weak temperature dependence of its giant electroclinic effect in the liquid crystalline smectic A* phase. Furthermore it possesses a high spontaneous polarization in the smectic C* phase. The origin of this striking electroclinic effect is the co-occurrence of a de Vries-type ordering with a weak first-order tilting transition (see the synchroton X-ray scattering profiles).
  • A thin PbTiO{sub 3}-n-p{sup +} silicon diode (MFSS) has been developed, in which the switching voltage changes in proportion to the infrared light power. The infrared-sensitive parts consist of PbTiO{sub 3} ferroelectric thin films deposited by RF sputtering. A fast response with a rise time of 0.647 {micro}s has been attained, which is fairly fast compared with the other types of thermal infrared sensors. Additionally, there is a wide voltage variation of 9 V for sensing the infrared light from off-state-voltage of 11 V to on-state-voltage of 2 V in the device. In this paper, the current-voltage curves, the effectmore » of infrared light power on switching voltage, and the effects of PbTiO{sub 3} thickness on switching voltage as well as sensitivity to infrared light are reported in detail.« less
  • Bacteriophage DNAs annealed into linear oligomeric concatemers were used to examine the quantitative pulsed-field gel electrophoretic behavior of different-sized DNAs as a function of electrical field strength and pulse time. Three zones of resolution are observed for increasingly larger DNAs. In the first two zones, the electrophoretic mobility decreases linearly with increasing DNA size. The separation in zone 2 is roughly twice that in zone 1. The largest DNA molecules do not resolve at all and migrate in a compression zone. Mobility in zone 1 increases linearly with the electric field strength and decreases with the inverse of the pulsemore » time. The behavior of DNA in zone 2 is qualitatively similar. However, the effect of field strength and pulse time on the separations in each zone is quite different. The results for zone 1 are generally consistent with the predictions of several existing physical models of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, but no model accounts for all of the observed behavior in the three zones.« less
  • The resolution of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is dramatically affected by the number and configuration of the electrodes used, because these alter the shape of the applied electrical fields. Here the authors present calculations and experiments on the effect of electrode position in one of the most commonly used pulsed-field gel electrophoresis configurations. The goal was to explore which aspects of the electrical field shape correlate with improved electrophoretic resolution. The most critical variable appears to be the angle between the alternate electrical fields. The most effective electrode configuration yield angles of more than 110{degree}. A continually increasing angle between themore » fields produces band sharpening that greatly enhances the resolution.« less