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DOE PAGESDOE PAGES

Frequently Asked Questions


DOE PAGES Overview

The Department of Energy Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (DOE PAGES) is the DOE discovery tool that makes peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from DOE research funding publicly accessible to read, download, and analyze at no charge to users.

DOE PAGES offers free public access to the best available full-text version of DOE-affiliated scholarly publications-either the peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript or the published scientific journal article-after an administrative interval of 12 months.

DOE PAGES is part of DOE's response to the February 2013 Office of Science and Technology Policy memorandum that called on federal agencies to develop plans to provide public access to the results of research they fund within a year of publication. The DOE public access discovery tool was developed and is maintained by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI).

When launched in August 2014, DOE PAGES contained an initial collection of accepted manuscripts and journal articles as a demonstration of its functionality and eventual expanded content. Two years later, the discovery tool contained 26,000 articles and accepted manuscripts, and it is anticipated that DOE PAGES will eventually achieve annual growth of 20,000-30,000 publicly-accessible articles and manuscripts.

DOE PAGES is a cooperative and cost-effective approach to public access to scientific publications stemming from DOE research and development. The discovery tool employs a hybrid model of both centralized and distributed content, with DOE PAGES maintaining a permanent archive of all full text and metadata. In this way, DOE PAGES builds on DOE's existing scientific and technical information (STI) infrastructure and also integrates publishers' public access efforts.


How do publications get into DOE PAGES?

DOE PAGES leverages the long-established DOE Scientific and Technical Information Program infrastructure and systems for collecting, preserving, and disseminating scientific and technical information to collect accepted manuscripts. DOE-funded researchers at national laboratories and grantees at other research institutions will use this existing infrastructure to submit metadata and links to accepted manuscripts (or the full text itself) to OSTI.

Researchers at a national lab or other major DOE facility who have a manuscript accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal should use their lab's routine processes for scientific and technical information (STI) submission. They should provide metadata/citation information for the journal article as well as either an upload of the accepted manuscript or a persistent hyperlink to the accepted manuscript in their lab/site's institutional repository. This procedure is comparable to the long-established submission process for technical reports and other types of STI. For more detailed instructions, please contact your lab or facility STI point of contact for more information.

Researchers with a grant from DOE (a DOE Financial Assistance Recipient) are to submit their journal article accepted manuscript through E-Link. E-Link allows them to easily submit their accepted manuscript via a webform in a simple step-by-step format. Through E-Link, you will submit metadata/citation information for the journal article as well as either an upload of the accepted manuscript or a link to the manuscript in your institutional or subject repository. If researchers have the DOI (digital object identifier) for the journal article, much of the metadata can be populated automatically for them. For more detailed instructions, they can refer to the DOE F 4600.2 in the terms and conditions of their award or refer to E-Link instructions.

To complement the DOE-supplied content and in support of "best available version," OSTI is collaborating with the publisher consortium CHORUS, or the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States. DOE PAGES ingests publisher-supplied metadata and links to participating publishers' DOE-affiliated publicly-accessible content.

OSTI also engages with other stakeholders' initiatives to advance public access, such as the university and research library community's Shared Access Research Ecosystem (SHARE).


What is OSTI's Commitment to Public Access?

Regardless of where DOE-affiliated articles or accepted manuscripts are hosted, DOE PAGES enables readers to search them all via a single query. In most cases, free public access to full text will occur after a 12-month administrative interval. Access requires no username, password, or other form of registration.

DOE invests roughly $12 billion annually in R&D, and OSTI ensures long-term preservation of and access to the results of this investment by making DOE-sponsored R&D results available through web-based discovery tools. To date, these tools have included electronic full-text research reports; energy-related citations going back to the Manhattan Project era; e-prints (journal article pre-publication drafts, scholarly papers and more); DOE patents; energy science and technology software; multimedia videos about DOE and other science research; DOE non-text data collections; and DOE R&D accomplishments. Through DOE PAGES, OSTI is now collecting, preserving, and making publicly accessible peer-reviewed journal articles or final accepted manuscripts resulting from agency funding.

General FAQs


What is DOE PAGES?

The Department of Energy Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (DOE PAGES) is the DOE discovery tool that makes peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from DOE research funding publicly accessible to read, download, and analyze at no charge to users.

DOE PAGES offers free public access to the best available full-text version of DOE-funded scholarly publications-either the peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript or the published scientific journal article-after an administrative interval of 12 months.


What is the DOE Public Access Plan?

On February 22, 2013, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) released a memorandum entitled "Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research." It directed Federal agencies with more than $100 million in research and development (R&D) expenditures to develop plans to support increased public access to the results of research funded by the Federal Government. The memo requires the agency public access plan to describe how the agency will make the published results of federally funded research freely available to the public within one year of publication, and it required researchers to better account for and manage the digital data resulting from federally funded scientific research.

The DOE Public Access Plan ensures the public has access to the published results of DOE-funded research by requiring researchers to submit metadata and a link to the full-text accepted manuscript (or the full text itself), that arise from DOE funding, to a designated DOE repository. DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) provides a web-based portal called DOE Energy Link (E-Link) for the submission of the metadata and a link to the full-text accepted manuscript (or the full text itself). OSTI then provides public access to publications through the DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (DOE PAGES). Requirements specify that (1) a minimum set of machine-readable metadata elements, comprising a metadata record, will be provided with the final accepted manuscript of peer-reviewed scholarly journal articles; (2) the accepted manuscript will be available for download, reading and analysis free of charge no later than 12 months after initial publication; and (3) the information will be managed to ensure long-term preservation.


Who can submit peer-reviewed scholarly publications to DOE PAGES?

All researchers receiving DOE funding are required to submit metadata and a persistent hyperlink to the full-text accepted manuscript (in an institutional repository) or the full text of the accepted manuscript itself to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI). For a list of metadata requirements, please see FAQ "What is metadata related to scholarly publications?"


What does DOE PAGES contain?

DOE PAGES offers free public access to the best available full-text version of DOE-funded scholarly publications - either the peer-reviewed accepted manuscript or the published scientific journal article - after an administrative interval of twelve months. For a more in-depth explanation of the article types found in DOE PAGES, please see FAQ "What types of full-text content are available in DOE PAGES?"


What is an accepted manuscript?

An accepted manuscript is defined as the version of the article that has been accepted for publication and includes all modifications resulting from the peer-review process, which is also called the final peer-reviewed accepted manuscript. It is the same content as the published version but does not include the publisher's copyediting, stylistic or formatting edits that will constitute the final "version of record" that appears in a scholarly journal. The key criteria for submission of accepted manuscripts to OSTI are (1) that DOE partially or completely funded the research reflected in the article or accepted manuscript and (2) that the publication has been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.


Does DOE PAGES provide the full text for all of its content?

Full-text access to publications occurs within 12 months of publication. DOE's policy is to provide access within 12 months of publication. Access will be provided earlier in cases when the publisher makes a full-text version available for free earlier than 12 months after publication.


What types of full-text content are available in DOE PAGES?

DOE PAGES search results will provide access to an accepted manuscript or the published article. Most typically, access is provided to an accepted manuscript.

An Accepted Manuscript is defined as the version of the article that has been accepted for publication and includes all modifications resulting from the peer-review process, which is also called the final peer-reviewed accepted manuscript. It is the same content as the published version but does not include the publisher's copyediting, stylistic or formatting edits that will constitute the final "version of record" that appears in a scholarly journal. The key criteria for submission of accepted manuscripts to OSTI are (1) that DOE partially or completely funded the research reflected in the article or accepted manuscript and (2) that the publication has been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Accepted Manuscripts are submitted to OSTI by the author/researcher or the researcher's institution. In some cases, DOE PAGES will also link to a Publisher's Accepted Manuscript through OSTI's collaboration with the publisher consortium CHORUS, or Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States. For more information about CHORUS, please see FAQ "What is CHORUS? What is the relationship to DOE PAGES?"

A Published Article is the final published article, including copyediting, stylistic edits, and formatting changes per a specific journal publisher. It is considered the "version of record" (VoR) because of potential post-publication updates such as errata, retractions, or other changes. When a publisher provides free access to the VoR, this is considered the "best available version," and DOE PAGES will link to it exclusively. When the VoR is not publicly available, DOE PAGES, within 12 months of publication, will provide access to the Accepted Manuscript.


What's the difference between DOE's Public Access Plan and Open Access (OA)?

Public Access refers to the U.S. Federal initiative to ensure access to federally funded research results. A high-level goal of public access is to advance science and technological innovation by sharing research results. DOE is following the practice established by U.S. federal agencies in using the term "public access" to characterize the plans and policies that implement the objectives of the OSTP memorandum of February 22, 2013.

While there are various forms of Open Access, this FAQ defines Open Access as online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access and free of many restrictions on use (see Wikipedia's Open Access Description). Within the topic of Open Access, there are different models such as green and gold OA. Green OA involves author deposit of accepted manuscripts into institutional or subject repositories, while gold OA typically means the author pays a fee to the publisher to enable open access. While most federal research funding allows for the payment of gold OA fees, DOE's implementation of public access is based on the green OA model, where authors deposit accepted manuscripts into DOE PAGES or into their institutional repositories, which are then accessed in DOE PAGES searches. For questions about OA articles, please email OSTIWebmaster@osti.gov.


How is DOE PAGES related to SciTech Connect/OSTI/etc.?

Access to DOE-funded research results is managed by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI). OSTI offers several ways for the public to search for and discover scientific and technical information (STI) via freely available, discovery tools. DOE Public Access Gateway for Science and Energy (PAGES) contains scholarly publications exclusively. The SciTech Connect portal offers access to an array of STI product types, including scholarly publications, technical reports, patents, software, conference papers, and more. Scholarly publication information is also available through the DOE PAGES API and SciTech Connect's API. Visit the OSTI website DOE Collections for more information about the various search options available.


Are there restrictions on the use of the material in DOE PAGES?

Although much of the material in DOE PAGES is subject to copyright protection under U.S. law, DOE PAGES users are allowed to read, download, and analyze the available material by virtue of the Federal Government's reserved rights. The Federal Government retains a royalty-free, irrevocable license to use, modify, reproduce, and publish copyrightable works first produced under a federal contract or grant. If DOE PAGES users wish to do more than read, download, and analyze available material, they should contact the respective authors or publishers for permission.

OSTI employs an Acceptable Use Policy to help safeguard and enhance the use of publicly accessible information by prohibiting excessive content requests or activities. Exemptions may be granted to individuals or organizations on a case by case basis. Email OSTIWebmaster@osti.gov with any questions.


What does "administrative interval" mean? How can I access an article still under the "administrative interval"?

DOE, like most other federal agencies, has implemented an embargo or "administrative interval" for access of up to 12 months from the date of publication for journal articles. Individual journals may institute shorter periods, and DOE PAGES will provide free access earlier than 12 months in those cases.

If you or your institution have a subscription to the journal in which the article was published, you will have access to the article during the administrative interval and can access the article in DOE PAGES by going to the Publisher's Version of Record link on the article metadata pages. If you do not have a subscription, other access options include article purchase or rental, library access, and contacting the author for scholarly purposes.

Author FAQs


I'm a researcher at a national lab and I've had a manuscript accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal; I've been told I need to submit my manuscript, how do I do it?

A researcher at a national lab or other major DOE facility who has a manuscript accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal should use their lab's routine processes for scientific and technical information (STI) submission. They should provide metadata/citation information for the journal article as well as either an upload of the accepted manuscript or a persistent hyperlink to the accepted manuscript in their lab/site's institutional repository that is hosting it. This procedure is comparable to the long-established submission process for technical reports and other types of STI. For more detailed instructions, please contact your lab or facility STI point of contact for more information.


I'm a researcher with a grant from DOE and I've had a manuscript accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal; I've been told I need to submit my manuscript, how do I do it?

Researchers with a grant from DOE (a DOE Financial Assistance Recipient) are to submit their journal article accepted manuscript through E-Link. E-Link allows them to easily submit their accepted manuscript via a webform in a simple step-by-step format. Through E-Link, they will submit metadata/citation information for the journal article as well as either an upload of the accepted manuscript or a link to the manuscript in their institutional or subject repository. If they have the DOI (digital object identifier) for the journal article, much of the metadata can be populated automatically for them. For more detailed instructions, they can refer to the DOE F 4600.2 in the terms and conditions of their award or refer to E-Link instructions.


How Papers Get into DOE PAGES

How Papers Get into DOE PAGES

point of contact E-Link's AM Wizard E-Link's AM Wizard instructions E-Link's AM Wizard

The Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Link system (E-Link), developed and maintained by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), is used for submitting scientific and technical information (STI) products, including journal article accepted manuscripts and other types of STI such as technical reports, conference proceedings, scientific software, etc. E-Link facilitates the electronic submittal of STI to DOE by its client community, including researchers, reviewers, research administrators, and others doing business with DOE.


Once journal article accepted manuscripts are submitted to E-Link, the record will then be processed appropriately and become visible and searchable in DOE PAGES.


Does a specific format need to be used for submission of accepted manuscripts?

Accepted manuscripts should be submitted as a PDF (portable document format), Microsoft Word Document (.doc, .docx), or OpenOffice/OpenDocument (.odf). If submitting a PDF, ensure that it is not encrypted, password protected, or corrupted. It is preferred that the PDF is compliant with one of four standards and with extractable text. The standards are PDF/A-1a, PDF/A-2a, PDF/A-3a, or PDF/UA. For more information, please see "Best Practices for Portable Document Format (PDF) Creation". PDFs submitted to OSTI (not compliant with one of the four standards or without extractable text) will take at least one additional business day to process. The following PDF/A and PDF/UA publications are an excellent source on the standards. It is recommended that a 508-compliant version be submitted because Federal agencies are required to make their electronic and information technology accessible to people with disabilities. This applies to web applications, web pages and associated files. DOE PAGES strives to ensure all pages on the site are accessible to the greatest possible number of people and Assistive Technology devices. The following links can help you develop pages that comply with accessibility laws and guidelines:

Section 508
Guidelines from the Access Board Electronic & Information Technology (link is external) including points (a) through (p) of Subsection 1194.22 Web-based intranet and internet information and systems (link is external).


I have already submitted my manuscript to NIH's PubMed Central or another government publication repository, but I am also partially funded by DOE. To comply with public access requirements do I also need to submit my article information and manuscript to E-Link?

This is a simpler submission when you have already deposited your accepted manuscript into another government repository. You still need to provide metadata and a link to the accepted manuscript to E-Link. You can enter the metadata using the auto-populate feature found in E-Link (by entering the DOI for the article E-Link is able to pull most of the metadata from Crossref), as well as your DOE contract number. For submission of the accepted manuscript, either a document upload or submission of a link to the accepted manuscript hosted in a publicly accessible repository is acceptable. E-Link accepts URL links from other government accepted manuscript repositories, so you can enter your article's PMC URL as the link to the full text.


What about supplemental information that is submitted to journals?

At this time, only accepted manuscripts are required to be provided to DOE OSTI. It is recognized that some publishers require supplemental information such as data sets when an article is accepted for publication. Separate publicly available datasets are another form of STI which may be submitted to OSTI. Only metadata/citation information is submitted to OSTI while the dataset(s) is hosted elsewhere in a repository or by the submitting site/research organization. There are metadata fields by which the data can be bibliographically linked to the accepted manuscript if sites choose to do so, but it is not a requirement at this time to provide supplemental information.


What is an Article Processing Charge? What should DOE authors do if asked to pay "author pays" fees?

An article processing charge (APC), also known as a publication fee, is a fee that is sometimes charged to authors in order to publish an article in an open access academic journal (see Wikipedia's APC description). These may also be known as "publication costs." DOE-funded authors are free to publish in journals of their choice, including Open Access journals, as authorized by their respective sites. However, regarding "author pays" or article processing charges, it is important for DOE-funded authors to know that it is not necessary to pay "author pays" fees or article processing charges solely to enable public access to their publications. DOE is implementing public access through its license to the accepted manuscript and through the voluntary public access efforts of publishers, not through "author pays" models. Authors may choose to publish with an Open Access journal and pay a fee to do so if their lab/site allows it; however, this is not necessary to comply with DOE's public access policy, and it must be in compliance with allowable costs under the terms of their lab's/site's contract with DOE or the terms of their financial assistance award.


What about copyright transfer and government rights?

Copyright transfer is a standard requirement by publishers that an author submitting an article for publication complete a Copyright Transfer Agreement prior to an article's acceptance. The wording on the forms may vary from publisher to publisher, but basic wording includes transfer of copyright to the publisher. However, a key point to note is that, regardless of the specific wording, the Government retains rights to the article. In fact, within the prime contract for DOE Laboratories is wording which states: "... (2) The contractor shall mark each scientific or technical article first produced or composed under this Contract and submitted for journal publication or similar means of dissemination with a notice, similar in all material respects to the following, on the front reflecting the Government's non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license in the copyright."

Notice: This manuscript has been authored by [insert the name of the Contractor] under Contract No. [insert the contract number] with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. (End of Notice) [Ref. DEAR970.5227-2 Rights in data-technology transfer]


How do I search DOE PAGES?

DOE PAGES search works much like a basic Google search, where you can enter your terms into the basic search box to retrieve results. You can search for a single term or a phrase by putting it in "double quotes." Additionally, DOE PAGES supports Boolean and proximity operators, wildcards, and parentheses for grouping:

Boolean Operators

DOE PAGES recognizes the operators AND, OR, and NOT.

Example: A search for water AND "climate change" will return results that include both the term water and the phrase climate change.

Example: A search for water OR "climate change" will return results that include either the term water or the phrase climate change.

Example: A search for water NOT "climate change" will return results that include the term water but not the phrase climate change.

+ and - allow for a search to either be required or forbidden in the search results.

Example: A search for energy +water will return results that include the term energy and also include the term water.

Example: A search for energy -water will return results that include the term energy but not the term water.

Proximity Operators

Example: "nuclear energy"~3 will return results where nuclear and energy are within three words of each other in the bibliographic record.

Parentheses for Grouping

Example: A search for water AND ("climate change" OR energy) will return results that include both the term water and either the phrase climate change or the term energy.


How do I use the Advanced Search?

The advanced search will allow you to perform more complex searches, offering you a number of fields, such as Title, Author, document Type, or Publication date to help you refine your search results.

All Fields
Searches all bibliographic data and the full text of the journal article.
Title
Searches only article titles.
Full Text
Searches only the full text of the document and not the bibliographic data.
Bibliographic
Searches all the bibliographic/metadata fields.
Creator/Author
Searches all author or creator names, including ORCID if available.
Article Type
Allows you to filter your results by article type, including accepted manuscript (AM), published article (PA), and publisher's accepted manuscript (PM). See "What types of full-text content are available in DOE PAGES?" for detailed descriptions of each.
Journal Name
Searches the journal title.
Subject
Searches both the standardized subject categories and keywords associated with the article.
Identifier Numbers
Searches for all identifying numbers, including DOE contract number, report number, non-DOE contract/award numbers, or other identifying numbers such as ISSN. This field searches the metadata fields OSTI ID, Report Number, Grant/Contract Number, Additional Journal Information, and DOI. For descriptions of these fields, please see "What is Bibliographic data/metadata related to scholarly publications?"
Research Org
Searches by the name(s) of the organization(s) that was funded and performed the research described in the article.
Sponsoring Org
Searches the name(s) of the DOE program office(s) that provided the funding for the research contributing to the article.
Publication Date
Searches for articles that were published within a specified timeframe. Select the starting date or ending date from the drop down calendar OR type MM/DD/YYYY, e.g. 01/01/2014.

Example:

Publication from: 01/01/2014 retrieves all articles published on or after 1/1/2014.
Publication to: 01/01/2014 retrieves all articles published on or before 1/1/2014

In the Advanced Search, what are the differences in searching "All Fields," "Full Text," and "Bibliographic Data"?

Performing an "All Fields" search retrieves results from the entire record, including the full text and the bibliographic information. The "Full Text" field searches only the full text of the document and not the bibliographic data. The "Bibliographic Data" field searches only the bibliographic information/metadata and not the full text.


How do I search by author?

You may use the basic search box to search by an author's full name (using quotations for phrase searching), author last name, or ORCID. Additionally, there is a field on the advanced search screen that allows you to search by name or ORCID in combination with any other advanced search field.


What is Bibliographic data/metadata related to scholarly publications?

Bibliographic data/metadata is information unique to and descriptive of a particular document. Basic bibliographic data includes the title, author(s), publication date, and journal name. This metadata improves online search and retrieval, and helps ensure preservation of the document. Below is a list of the metadata that OSTI collects and that is searchable in DOE PAGES, with those that can be searched using the advanced search fields indicated with an asterisk(*):

Title*- the title of the article

Abstract- summary of the information contained in the article

Author(s)*- includes first and last name, may include middle name/initial, email address, ORCID, or institutional affiliation

Publication Date*- the date the article was published

OSTI ID*- unique identifier assigned by OSTI upon article submission

Report Number*- unique identifier created by researcher, lab, or institution and associated with the article. May also contain other identifying numbers that may have meaning or retrieval utility, such as arXiv.org numbers or numbers assigned by a university or domain area repository.

Grant/Contract Number*- the DOE contract number under which the article research was conducted. May also contain non-DOE contract numbers if the research was funded by other organizations.

Type*- accepted manuscript, published article, publisher's accepted manuscript

Journal Name- the name of the journal in which the accepted manuscript is to be published (or was published)

Additional Journal Information*- other information associated with the article, including journal volume and issue number, serial identifier (ISSN), and article page range.

Digital Object Identifier (DOI)*-a unique persistent identifier that references a digital object and provides long-term access; DOIs remain stable even if the underlying address or URL for the content changes.

Publisher- the name of the publisher that issues the journal in which the accepted manuscript is to be published (or was published).

Research Organization*- the name(s) of the organization(s) that performed the research or issued the scientific and technical information that led to the article.

Sponsoring Organization*-- the name(s) of the DOE program office(s) that provided the funding for the research contributing to the article

Contributing Organizations- the name(s) of a research/project collaboration, company, institution, or organization the author(s) wishes to acknowledge that are NOT an author affiliation, originating research organization, or funding organization

Country of Publication- the country in which the journal publishing the article is located

Language- the language the article is published in

Subject*- words or phrases that describe the project as summarized in the article. This includes subject categories picked from a standardized authority list or keywords assigned to the article either by the author(s) or journal.

Related Documents- citation information for supplementary datasets or other items published with the journal article

Related Identifiers/DOIs- other documents, datasets, or software applications that relate to the article


What types of full-text content are available in DOE PAGES?

DOE PAGES search results will provide access to an accepted manuscript or the published article. Most typically, access is provided to an accepted manuscript.

An Accepted Manuscript is defined as the version of the article that has been accepted for publication and includes all modifications resulting from the peer-review process, which is also called the final peer-reviewed accepted manuscript. It is the same content as the published version but does not include the publisher's copyediting, stylistic or formatting edits that will constitute the final "version of record" that appears in a scholarly journal. The key criteria for submission of accepted manuscripts to OSTI are (1) that DOE partially or completely funded the research reflected in the article or accepted manuscript and (2) that the publication has been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Accepted Manuscripts are submitted to OSTI by the author/researcher or the researcher's institution. In some cases, DOE PAGES will also link to a Publisher's Accepted Manuscript through OSTI's collaboration with the publisher consortium CHORUS, or Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States. For more information about CHORUS, please see FAQ "What is CHORUS? What is the relationship to DOE PAGES?"

A Published Article is the final published article, including copyediting, stylistic edits, and formatting changes per a specific journal publisher. It is considered the "version of record" (VoR) because of potential post-publication updates such as errata, retractions, or other changes. When a publisher provides free access to the VoR, this is considered the "best available version," and DOE PAGES will link to it exclusively. When the VoR is not publicly available, DOE PAGES, within 12 months of publication, will provide access to the Accepted Manuscript.


Are journal articles and accepted manuscripts full-text searchable in DOE PAGES?

Yes, the accepted manuscripts and journal articles have been indexed to enable full-text searching. You can also search easily by common bibliographic information including author, title, identifying numbers, and publication dates.


Can I change how my search results are displayed? What is the difference between the "Basic results view" and the "Detailed results view"?

Yes. At any time, you can change how your results are displayed by selecting the "Switch to ..." link at the top right of your results screen. The Basic view will display the title, author, publication date, and description in a list format. The Detailed view will display fields of your choosing in a more compact, tabular format. The Detailed view allows for extensive customization of the results display.


Can I sort or filter my results?

Yes, you may filter your results by article type (in the advanced search screen), by article availability (Publicly Available Full Text or Citation Only), or by Author. Sort options on the results page include sorting by relevance or by publication date.


Can I limit my results to what is publicly accessible?

Yes. On the results page you may use the left-hand filter option "Publicly Available Full Text" to limit your results to articles and accepted manuscripts that are out of the administrative interval, or embargo, and can be freely accessed.


Can I save or download the results of a search?

Yes. If the item is available electronically, a full-text icon will be shown at the right of the result. Items in DOE PAGES are publicly-available and free.

You also may save the bibliographic/metadata information for a set of results as an Excel, CSV, or XML file from the results screen.

From an individual bibliographic/metadata details page you can export the metadata to Endnote or save it in in RIS, Excel, CSV, or XML format. You also have the option to generate a citation for the record in various formats, including MLA, APA, Chicago, and Bibtex.


How can I view the details about an article?

By clicking the title of an article in the results list you will be directed to the article record, providing bibliographic information, article accessibility options, as well as citation format and metadata export options.


I see that I can access either the Accepted Manuscript or go to the publisher's version (via the DOI link) on the record details page. What's the difference?

Accessing the DOE Accepted Manuscript provides you with a downloadable full text version (submitted by the DOE researcher or the researcher's institution) of the version of the article that has been accepted for publication and includes all modifications resulting from the peer-review process, which is also called the final peer-reviewed accepted manuscript. The Publisher's Accepted Manuscript or DOI link directs you to the publisher's article landing/metadata page. The landing page may offer a free version of record provided by the publisher through DOE's CHORUS agreement (see "What is CHORUS?" FAQ), or will provide a link accessible to those with a subscription to the journal, or allow for the purchase the article.


During the embargo (or administrative interval) for an article, what is accessible?

New content provided to the public includes bibliographic information and related metadata for publications until the embargo (administrative interval) of up to 12 months from the publication date has passed, at which time full-text links and access will be enabled. During the embargo, citations will include a notation indicating when the full text will be publicly available.


Public Access FAQs


What is DOE's Public Access Plan?

The DOE Public Access Plan, issued in July 2014, was issued as an official response to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) memorandum entitled "Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research." The plan describes the Department's commitment to increase public access to DOE-funded research results published in scholarly journals. Implementation as described in the Public Access Plan will ensure that the public has access to the published results of DOE-funded research by requiring scientists to submit final peer-reviewed accepted manuscripts that arise from DOE funds to a designated DOE repository. DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) is providing a submission system called DOE Energy Link (E-Link) and a web-based portal, the DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (DOE PAGES), for public access and search. The plan requires researchers to provide metadata and a link to the full-text accepted manuscript (or the full text itself), with the final peer-reviewed accepted manuscript of scholarly publication available to read, download, and analyze free of charge no later than 12 months after initial publication; and that the information will be managed to ensure long-term preservation.


Why does DOE have a Public Access Plan?

On February 22, 2013, the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) released a memorandum entitled "Increasing Access to the Results of Federally Funded Research." It directed Federal agencies with more than $100 million in research and development (R&D) expenditures to develop plans to make the published results of federally funded research freely available to the public within one year of publication, and it required researchers to better account for and manage the digital data resulting from federally funded scientific research. DOE's response in its Public Access Plan builds upon its long tradition of STI management and its established Scientific and Technical Information Program (STIP) infrastructure, which ensures long-term access and preservation of various forms of STI resulting from DOE-funded work.


When did the public access requirement go into effect?

For DOE financial assistance recipients (i.e., grantees), the public access requirement applies to any award made or renewed on or after October 1, 2014, with the requirement stated in the DOE terms and conditions of the award. For publications emanating from DOE national laboratories and other DOE facilities, DOE requires public access to any scholarly publication published on or after October 1, 2014. [Note: It is recognized that DOE labs and sites will implement submission of accepted manuscripts based on their labs/sites' respective systems and procedures.]


What's the difference between DOE's Public Access Plan and Open Access (OA)?

Public Access refers to the U.S. Federal initiative to ensure access to federally funded research results. A high-level goal of public access is to advance science and technological innovation by sharing research results. DOE is following the practice established by U.S. federal agencies in using the term "public access" to characterize the plans and policies that implement the objectives of the OSTP memorandum of February 22, 2013.

While there are various forms of Open Access, this FAQ defines Open Access as online research outputs that are free of all restrictions on access and free of many restrictions on use (see Wikipedia's Open Access Description). Within the topic of Open Access, there are different models such as green and gold OA. Green OA involves author deposit of accepted manuscripts into institutional or subject repositories, while gold OA typically means the author pays a fee to the publisher to enable open access. While most federal research funding allows for the payment of gold OA fees, DOE's implementation of public access is based on the green OA model, where authors deposit accepted manuscripts into DOE PAGES or into their institutional repositories, which are then accessed in DOE PAGES searches. For questions about OA articles, please email OSTIWebmaster@osti.gov.


Who can deposit?

Public access requirements are applicable to scholarly publications (i.e., final, peer-reviewed accepted manuscripts) produced in whole or in part by DOE federal employees, National Laboratory and other Management and Operating (M&O) contractor employees, financial assistance awardees, other grantees, and other contractor entities where the publication describes unclassified and otherwise unrestricted research findings produced with complete or partial DOE funding, unless otherwise prohibited by law, regulation, or policy. Awards to institutions (e.g., financial assistance awards or grants) and major facility contracts are also subject to the DOE Public Access requirements. Principal Investigators must ensure that all researchers who work on projects funded in whole or in part by DOE (grants or cooperative agreements as well as contracts) comply with the requirements.


What is required for depositing?

All researchers receiving DOE funding are required to submit metadata and a link to the full-text accepted manuscript (or the full text itself) to DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI). Please see FAQ "What is Bibliographic Data/metadata" for a full list of the metadata fields.


How can the public search material resulting from DOE-funded research?

Access to DOE-funded research results is managed by the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI), which offers several ways for the public to search for scientific and technical information (STI) via freely available, discovery search tools. Scholarly publications are being made available in the DOE Public Access Gateway for Science and Energy (PAGES). Another key discovery tool offered by OSTI is SciTech Connect, which offers access to an array of STI product types, including scholarly publications, technical reports, patents, software, conference papers, and more. Visit the OSTI website DOE Collections for more information about the various search options available.


What is DOE PAGES?

The Department of Energy Public Access Gateway for Energy and Science (DOE PAGES) is the DOE discovery tool that makes peer-reviewed scholarly publications resulting from DOE research funding publicly accessible to read, download, and analyze at no charge to users.

DOE PAGES offers free public access to the best available full-text version of DOE-funded scholarly publications - either the peer-reviewed, accepted manuscript or the published scientific journal article - after an administrative interval of 12 months.


What is an "accepted manuscript"? What is a "version of record"?

The accepted manuscript is defined as the version of the article that has been accepted for publication and includes all modifications resulting from the peer-review process, which is also called the final peer-reviewed accepted manuscript. It is the same content as the published version but does not include the publisher's copyediting, stylistic or formatting edits that will constitute the final "version of record" that appears in a scholarly journal. The key criteria for submission of accepted manuscripts to OSTI are (1) that DOE partially or completely funded the research reflected in the article or accepted manuscript and (2) that the publication has been accepted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal. Accepted Manuscripts are submitted to OSTI by the researcher or the researcher's institution.

The version of record is the publisher's authoritative copy of the paper, including all modifications from the publishing peer-review process, copyediting, stylistic edits, and formatting changes per a specific journal publisher.


Does DOE have an embargo or delay for access to journal publications?

Yes, DOE, like most other federal agencies, has implemented an embargo or administrative delay for access of up to 12 months from the date of publication for journal articles. In cases when a publisher itself provides or allows free access sooner than 12 months, DOE PAGES will provide earlier access as well. In any case, DOE's policy is to provide free public access no later than 12 months after publication.


What is CHORUS? What is the relationship to DOE PAGES?

Following the issuance of the OSTP memorandum in 2013, the publishing community developed a multi-publisher stakeholder organization, the Clearinghouse for Open Research of the United States (CHORUS), to provide access to metadata for journal articles resulting from government funding. As a complement to author submissions of accepted manuscripts, DOE PAGES also links to participating publisher-supplied journal articles via CHORUS-supplied metadata.


Where can I get permission to reproduce articles? How does DOE PAGES address creative reuse?

DOE's Public Access Plan notes that it will work with stakeholders to better understand potential use cases for "creative reuse" and will explore public-private solutions. If you have a particular use case, please contact us at OSTIWebmaster@osti.gov.


What about copyright transfer and government rights?

Copyright transfer is a standard requirement by publishers that an author submitting an article for publication complete a Copyright Transfer Agreement prior to an article's acceptance. The wording on the forms may vary from publisher to publisher, but basic wording includes transfer of copyright to the publisher. However, a key point to note is that, regardless of the specific wording, the Government retains rights to the article. In fact, within the prime contract for DOE Laboratories is wording which states: "... (2) The contractor shall mark each scientific or technical article first produced or composed under this Contract and submitted for journal publication or similar means of dissemination with a notice, similar in all material respects to the following, on the front reflecting the Government's non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license in the copyright."

Notice: This manuscript has been authored by [insert the name of the Contractor] under Contract No. [insert the contract number] with the U.S. Department of Energy. The United States Government retains and the publisher, by accepting the article for publication, acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce the published form of this manuscript, or allow others to do so, for United States Government purposes. (End of Notice) [Ref. DEAR970.5227-2 Rights in data-technology transfer] [2]


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