skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Differential Age Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Associative Memory

Abstract

Abstract Objectives Older adults experience associative memory deficits relative to younger adults (Old & Naveh-Benjamin, 2008). The aim of this study was to test the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on face-name associative memory in older and younger adults. Method Experimenters applied active (1.5 mA) or sham (0.1 mA) stimulation with the anode placed over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) during a face-name encoding task, and measured both cued recall and recognition performance. Participants completed memory tests immediately after stimulation and after a 24-h delay to examine both immediate and delayed stimulation effects on memory. Results Results showed improved face-name associative memory performance for both recall and recognition measures, but only for younger adults, whereas there was no difference between active and sham stimulation for older adults. For younger adults, stimulation-induced memory improvements persisted after a 24-h delay, suggesting delayed effects of tDCS after a consolidation period. Discussion Although effective in younger adults, these results suggest that older adults may be resistant to this intervention, at least under the stimulation parameters used in the current study. This finding is inconsistent with a commonly seen trend, where tDCS effects on cognition are larger in older than younger adults.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [2];
  1. Loyola University Chicago
  2. University of Illinois at Chicago
  3. Sandia National Laboratories
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1562341
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0003525
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
The Journals of Gerontology: Series B
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: The Journals of Gerontology: Series B Journal Volume: 74 Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 1079-5014
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Leach, Ryan C., McCurdy, Matthew P., Trumbo, Michael C., Matzen, Laura E., Leshikar, Eric D., and Anderson, ed., Nicole. Differential Age Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Associative Memory. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1093/geronb/gby003.
Leach, Ryan C., McCurdy, Matthew P., Trumbo, Michael C., Matzen, Laura E., Leshikar, Eric D., & Anderson, ed., Nicole. Differential Age Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Associative Memory. Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1093/geronb/gby003.
Leach, Ryan C., McCurdy, Matthew P., Trumbo, Michael C., Matzen, Laura E., Leshikar, Eric D., and Anderson, ed., Nicole. Thu . "Differential Age Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Associative Memory". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1093/geronb/gby003.
@article{osti_1562341,
title = {Differential Age Effects of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation on Associative Memory},
author = {Leach, Ryan C. and McCurdy, Matthew P. and Trumbo, Michael C. and Matzen, Laura E. and Leshikar, Eric D. and Anderson, ed., Nicole},
abstractNote = {Abstract Objectives Older adults experience associative memory deficits relative to younger adults (Old & Naveh-Benjamin, 2008). The aim of this study was to test the effect of transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) on face-name associative memory in older and younger adults. Method Experimenters applied active (1.5 mA) or sham (0.1 mA) stimulation with the anode placed over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) during a face-name encoding task, and measured both cued recall and recognition performance. Participants completed memory tests immediately after stimulation and after a 24-h delay to examine both immediate and delayed stimulation effects on memory. Results Results showed improved face-name associative memory performance for both recall and recognition measures, but only for younger adults, whereas there was no difference between active and sham stimulation for older adults. For younger adults, stimulation-induced memory improvements persisted after a 24-h delay, suggesting delayed effects of tDCS after a consolidation period. Discussion Although effective in younger adults, these results suggest that older adults may be resistant to this intervention, at least under the stimulation parameters used in the current study. This finding is inconsistent with a commonly seen trend, where tDCS effects on cognition are larger in older than younger adults.},
doi = {10.1093/geronb/gby003},
journal = {The Journals of Gerontology: Series B},
number = 7,
volume = 74,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {2018},
month = {2}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1093/geronb/gby003

Save / Share: