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Title: Recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass

Abstract

To reduce the cost of the enzymes for the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, two main strategies have been followed: one, the reduction of enzyme dosing by the use of more efficient and stable enzymatic cocktails; another, to include accessory enzymes in the cocktails to increase yields by reducing the recalcitrant carbohydrate fraction remaining at the end of the process. To guide this second strategy, we have explored the chemical bond composition of different fractions of recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis. As a result, two lignocellulosic feedstocks of relevance for the biofuels industry have been analyzed, corn stover and sugarcane straw. On comparing the composition of chemical bonds of the starting pretreated material with samples after standard and forced hydrolysis (with enzyme overdosing), we obtained similar sugar and chemical bond composition. In conclusion, this suggests that the current enzymatic cocktails bear the set of enzymes needed to hydrolyze these feedstocks. From our point of view, the results show the need for a parallel fine-tuning of the enzymatic cocktails with the pretreatment process to maximize sugar release yield.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [1]
  1. C/Energia Solar, Seville (Spain)
  2. Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)
  3. Univ. de Sevilla y CSIC, Seville (Spain)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Georgia Research Foundation, Inc., Athens, GA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1364046
Grant/Contract Number:  
FG02-93ER20097
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biotechnology for Biofuels
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1754-6834
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; enzymatic hydrolysis; lignocellulosic biomass; recalcitrant carbohydrates; bioethanol

Citation Formats

Alcantara, Maria Angeles Bermudez, Dobruchowska, Justyna, Azadi, Parastoo, Garcia, Bruno Diez, Molina-Heredia, Fernando P., and Reyes-Sosa, Francisco Manuel. Recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1186/s13068-016-0629-4.
Alcantara, Maria Angeles Bermudez, Dobruchowska, Justyna, Azadi, Parastoo, Garcia, Bruno Diez, Molina-Heredia, Fernando P., & Reyes-Sosa, Francisco Manuel. Recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass. United States. doi:10.1186/s13068-016-0629-4.
Alcantara, Maria Angeles Bermudez, Dobruchowska, Justyna, Azadi, Parastoo, Garcia, Bruno Diez, Molina-Heredia, Fernando P., and Reyes-Sosa, Francisco Manuel. Thu . "Recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass". United States. doi:10.1186/s13068-016-0629-4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1364046.
@article{osti_1364046,
title = {Recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis of pretreated lignocellulosic biomass},
author = {Alcantara, Maria Angeles Bermudez and Dobruchowska, Justyna and Azadi, Parastoo and Garcia, Bruno Diez and Molina-Heredia, Fernando P. and Reyes-Sosa, Francisco Manuel},
abstractNote = {To reduce the cost of the enzymes for the hydrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass, two main strategies have been followed: one, the reduction of enzyme dosing by the use of more efficient and stable enzymatic cocktails; another, to include accessory enzymes in the cocktails to increase yields by reducing the recalcitrant carbohydrate fraction remaining at the end of the process. To guide this second strategy, we have explored the chemical bond composition of different fractions of recalcitrant carbohydrates after enzymatic hydrolysis. As a result, two lignocellulosic feedstocks of relevance for the biofuels industry have been analyzed, corn stover and sugarcane straw. On comparing the composition of chemical bonds of the starting pretreated material with samples after standard and forced hydrolysis (with enzyme overdosing), we obtained similar sugar and chemical bond composition. In conclusion, this suggests that the current enzymatic cocktails bear the set of enzymes needed to hydrolyze these feedstocks. From our point of view, the results show the need for a parallel fine-tuning of the enzymatic cocktails with the pretreatment process to maximize sugar release yield.},
doi = {10.1186/s13068-016-0629-4},
journal = {Biotechnology for Biofuels},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {10}
}

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Cited by: 7 works
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