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Title: Global, Hemispheric, and Zonal Temperature Deviations Derived From a 63-Station Radiosonde Network

Abstract

Surface temperatures and thickness-derived temperatures from a 63-station, globally distributed radiosonde network have been used to estimate global, hemispheric, and zonal annual and seasonal temperature deviations. Most of the temperature values used were column-mean temperatures, obtained from the differences in height (thickness) between constant-pressure surfaces at individual radiosonde stations. The pressure-height data before 1980 were obtained from published values in Monthly Climatic Data for the World. Between 1980 and 1990, Angell used data from both the Climatic Data for the World and the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) Network received at the National Meteorological Center. Between 1990 and 1995, the data were obtained only from GTS, and since 1995 the data have been obtained from National Center for Atmospheric Research files. The data are evaluated as deviations from the mean based on the interval 1958-1977. The station deviations have been averaged (with equal weighting) to obtain annual and seasonal temperature deviations for the globe, the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and the following latitudinal zones: North (60° N-90° N) and South (60° S-90° S) Polar; North (30° N-60° N) and South (30° S-60° S) Temperate; North (10° N-30° N) and South (10° S-30° S) Subtropical; Tropical(30° S-30° N); and Equatorial (10° S-10°more » N). The seasonal calculations are for the standard meteorological seasons (i.e., winter is defined as December, January, and February; spring is March, April, and May, etc.) and the annual calculations are for December through the following November (i.e., for the four meteorological seasons). For greater details, see Angell and Korshover (1983) and Angell (1988, 1991)« less

Authors:

  1. NOAA, Air Resources Laboratory
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org.:
Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) (United States); Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1394912
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/cli.005

Citation Formats

Angell, J. K. Global, Hemispheric, and Zonal Temperature Deviations Derived From a 63-Station Radiosonde Network. United States: N. p., 2011. Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/cli.005.
Angell, J. K. Global, Hemispheric, and Zonal Temperature Deviations Derived From a 63-Station Radiosonde Network. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/cli.005
Angell, J. K. 2011. "Global, Hemispheric, and Zonal Temperature Deviations Derived From a 63-Station Radiosonde Network". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/cli.005. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1394912. Pub date:Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2011
@article{osti_1394912,
title = {Global, Hemispheric, and Zonal Temperature Deviations Derived From a 63-Station Radiosonde Network},
author = {Angell, J. K.},
abstractNote = {Surface temperatures and thickness-derived temperatures from a 63-station, globally distributed radiosonde network have been used to estimate global, hemispheric, and zonal annual and seasonal temperature deviations. Most of the temperature values used were column-mean temperatures, obtained from the differences in height (thickness) between constant-pressure surfaces at individual radiosonde stations. The pressure-height data before 1980 were obtained from published values in Monthly Climatic Data for the World. Between 1980 and 1990, Angell used data from both the Climatic Data for the World and the Global Telecommunications System (GTS) Network received at the National Meteorological Center. Between 1990 and 1995, the data were obtained only from GTS, and since 1995 the data have been obtained from National Center for Atmospheric Research files. The data are evaluated as deviations from the mean based on the interval 1958-1977. The station deviations have been averaged (with equal weighting) to obtain annual and seasonal temperature deviations for the globe, the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, and the following latitudinal zones: North (60° N-90° N) and South (60° S-90° S) Polar; North (30° N-60° N) and South (30° S-60° S) Temperate; North (10° N-30° N) and South (10° S-30° S) Subtropical; Tropical(30° S-30° N); and Equatorial (10° S-10° N). The seasonal calculations are for the standard meteorological seasons (i.e., winter is defined as December, January, and February; spring is March, April, and May, etc.) and the annual calculations are for December through the following November (i.e., for the four meteorological seasons). For greater details, see Angell and Korshover (1983) and Angell (1988, 1991)},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/cli.005},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2011},
month = {1}
}

Works referencing / citing this record:

Change-Point Analysis of Polar Zone Radiosonde Temperature Data
journal, March 2014


Change-Point Analysis of Polar Zone Radiosonde Temperature Data
journal, March 2014


Gregorian calendar bias in monthly temperature databases
journal, January 2008


Gregorian calendar bias in monthly temperature databases
journal, January 2008