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Title: Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming

Abstract

in this paper we estimate the European potential for carbon mitigation of no-till farming using results from European tillage experiments. Our calculations suggest some potential in terms of (a) reduced agricultural fossil fuel emissions, and (b) increased soil carbon sequestration. We estimate that 100% conversion to no-till farming would be likely to sequester about 23 Tg C y–11 in the European Union or about 43 Tg C y–1 in the wider Europe (excluding the former Soviet Union). In addition, up to 3.2 Tg C y–1 could be saved in agricultural fossil fuel emissions. Compared to estimates of the potential for carbon sequestration of other carbon mitigation options, no-till agriculture shows nearly twice the potential of scenarios whereby soils are amended with organic materials. Our calculations suggest that 100% conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe could mitigate all fossil fuel-carbon emissions from agriculture in Europe. However, this is equivalent to only about 4.1% of total anthropogenic CO2-carbon produced annually in Europe (excluding the former Soviet Union) which in turn is equivalent to about 0.8% of global annual anthropogenic CO2-carbon emissions.

Authors:
; ; ;
  1. University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) (United States); Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council of the United Kingdom
Collaborations:
Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1389520
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.003

Citation Formats

Smith, P., Powlson, D., Glendining, M., and Smith, J. Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming. United States: N. p., 2003. Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.003.
Smith, P., Powlson, D., Glendining, M., & Smith, J. Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.003
Smith, P., Powlson, D., Glendining, M., and Smith, J. 2003. "Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.003. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389520. Pub date:Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2003
@article{osti_1389520,
title = {Preliminary Estimates of the Potential for Carbon Mitigation in European Soils Through No-Till Farming},
author = {Smith, P. and Powlson, D. and Glendining, M. and Smith, J.},
abstractNote = {in this paper we estimate the European potential for carbon mitigation of no-till farming using results from European tillage experiments. Our calculations suggest some potential in terms of (a) reduced agricultural fossil fuel emissions, and (b) increased soil carbon sequestration. We estimate that 100% conversion to no-till farming would be likely to sequester about 23 Tg C y–11 in the European Union or about 43 Tg C y–1 in the wider Europe (excluding the former Soviet Union). In addition, up to 3.2 Tg C y–1 could be saved in agricultural fossil fuel emissions. Compared to estimates of the potential for carbon sequestration of other carbon mitigation options, no-till agriculture shows nearly twice the potential of scenarios whereby soils are amended with organic materials. Our calculations suggest that 100% conversion to no-till agriculture in Europe could mitigate all fossil fuel-carbon emissions from agriculture in Europe. However, this is equivalent to only about 4.1% of total anthropogenic CO2-carbon produced annually in Europe (excluding the former Soviet Union) which in turn is equivalent to about 0.8% of global annual anthropogenic CO2-carbon emissions.},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.003},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2003},
month = {1}
}

Works referencing / citing this record:

Preliminary estimates of the potential for carbon mitigation in European soils through no-till farming
journal, August 1998


Conducting an Agricultural Life Cycle Assessment: Challenges and Perspectives
journal, January 2013


Traits to Ecosystems: The Ecological Sustainability Challenge When Developing Future Energy Crops
journal, May 2014


Brazilian greenhouse gas emissions: the importance of agriculture and livestock
journal, December 2009