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Title: Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential

Abstract

When agricultural land is no longer used for cultivation and allowed to revert to natural vegetation or replanted to perennial vegetation, soil organic carbon can accumulate. This accumulation process essentially reverses some of the effects responsible for soil organic carbon losses from when the land was converted from perennial vegetation. We discuss the essential elements of what is known about soil organic matter dynamics that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature that reports changes in soil organic carbon after changes in land-use that favour carbon accumulation. This data summary provides a guide to approximate rates of SOC sequestration that are possible with management, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration in soil. There is a large variation in the length of time for and the rate at which carbon may accumulate in soil, related to the productivity of the recovering vegetation, physical and biological conditions in the soil, and the past history of soil organic carbon inputs and physical disturbance. Maximum rates of C accumulation during the early aggrading stage of perennial vegetation growth, while substantial, are usually much lessmore » than 100g C m–2 y–1. Average rates of accumulation are similar for forest or grassland establishment: 33.8 g C m–2 y–1 and 33.2 g C m–2 y–1, respectively. These observed rates of soil organic C accumulation, when combined with the small amount of land area involved, are insufficient to account for a significant fraction of the missing C in the global carbon cycle as accumulating in the soils of formerly agricultural land.« less

Authors:
;
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. Tuskeegee University, Tuskeegee, AL (United States)
Publication Date:
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-96OR22464
Research Org.:
Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) (United States); Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
Collaborations:
Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1389526
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.009

Citation Formats

Post, W. M., and Kwon, K. C. Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.009.
Post, W. M., & Kwon, K. C. Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.009
Post, W. M., and Kwon, K. C. 2005. "Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.009. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389526. Pub date:Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2005
@article{osti_1389526,
title = {Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and Potential},
author = {Post, W. M. and Kwon, K. C.},
abstractNote = {When agricultural land is no longer used for cultivation and allowed to revert to natural vegetation or replanted to perennial vegetation, soil organic carbon can accumulate. This accumulation process essentially reverses some of the effects responsible for soil organic carbon losses from when the land was converted from perennial vegetation. We discuss the essential elements of what is known about soil organic matter dynamics that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature that reports changes in soil organic carbon after changes in land-use that favour carbon accumulation. This data summary provides a guide to approximate rates of SOC sequestration that are possible with management, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration in soil. There is a large variation in the length of time for and the rate at which carbon may accumulate in soil, related to the productivity of the recovering vegetation, physical and biological conditions in the soil, and the past history of soil organic carbon inputs and physical disturbance. Maximum rates of C accumulation during the early aggrading stage of perennial vegetation growth, while substantial, are usually much less than 100g C m–2 y–1. Average rates of accumulation are similar for forest or grassland establishment: 33.8 g C m–2 y–1 and 33.2 g C m–2 y–1, respectively. These observed rates of soil organic C accumulation, when combined with the small amount of land area involved, are insufficient to account for a significant fraction of the missing C in the global carbon cycle as accumulating in the soils of formerly agricultural land.},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.009},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {1}
}

Works referencing / citing this record:

Whole Farm Net Greenhouse Gas Abatement from Establishing Kikuyu-Based Perennial Pastures in South-Western Australia
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Effects of Revegetation on Soil Organic Carbon Storage and Erosion-Induced Carbon Loss under Extreme Rainstorms in the Hill and Gully Region of the Loess Plateau
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Response of Soil Properties and Microbial Communities to Agriculture: Implications for Primary Productivity and Soil Health Indicators
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A Multi-scale Spatial Analysis of Native and Exotic Plant Species Richness Within a Mixed-Disturbance Oak Savanna Landscape
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Chinese Grain for Green Program led to highly increased soil organic carbon levels: A meta-analysis
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The potential for carbon sequestration in Australian agricultural soils is technically and economically limited
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Long-term intensive management increased carbon occluded in phytolith (PhytOC) in bamboo forest soils
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Carbon emissions from land-use change and management in China between 1990 and 2010
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Conducting an Agricultural Life Cycle Assessment: Challenges and Perspectives
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Carbon fluxes resulting from land-use changes in the Tamaulipan thornscrub of northeastern Mexico
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Carbon Sequestration by Perennial Energy Crops: Is the Jury Still Out?
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Organic carbon stocks and sequestration rates of forest soils in G ermany
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Topographic Variation in Aboveground Biomass in a Subtropical Evergreen Broad-Leaved Forest in China
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Projection of corn production and stover-harvesting impacts on soil organic carbon dynamics in the U.S. Temperate Prairies
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Mercury in the Soil of Two Contrasting Watersheds in the Eastern United States
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Impact of tropical land-use change on soil organic carbon stocks - a meta-analysis: SOIL ORGANIC CARBON AND LAND-USE CHANGE
journal, November 2010


Interannual variations of soil organic carbon fractions in unmanaged volcanic soils (Canary Islands, Spain)
journal, August 2012


Using LiDAR Data to Measure the 3D Green Biomass of Beijing Urban Forest in China
journal, October 2013