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Title: MI high power operation and future plans

Abstract

Fermilab's Main Injector on acceleration cycles to 120 GeV has been running a mixed mode operation delivering beam to both the antiproton source for pbar production and to the NuMI[1] target for neutrino production since 2005. On January 2008 the slip stacking process used to increase the beam to the pbar target was expanded to include the beam to the NuMI target increasing both the beam intensity and power. The current high power MI operation will be described along with the near future plans.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
940840
Report Number(s):
FERMILAB-CONF-08-391-AD
TRN: US0807214
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-07CH11359
Resource Type:
Conference
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATION; ANTIPROTON SOURCES; NEUTRINOS; PRODUCTION; SLIP; TARGETS; Accelerators

Citation Formats

Kourbanis, Ioanis, and /Fermilab. MI high power operation and future plans. United States: N. p., 2008. Web.
Kourbanis, Ioanis, & /Fermilab. MI high power operation and future plans. United States.
Kourbanis, Ioanis, and /Fermilab. 2008. "MI high power operation and future plans". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/940840.
@article{osti_940840,
title = {MI high power operation and future plans},
author = {Kourbanis, Ioanis and /Fermilab},
abstractNote = {Fermilab's Main Injector on acceleration cycles to 120 GeV has been running a mixed mode operation delivering beam to both the antiproton source for pbar production and to the NuMI[1] target for neutrino production since 2005. On January 2008 the slip stacking process used to increase the beam to the pbar target was expanded to include the beam to the NuMI target increasing both the beam intensity and power. The current high power MI operation will be described along with the near future plans.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2008,
month = 9
}

Conference:
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  • Fermilab's Main Injector on acceleration cycles to 120 GeV has been running a mixed mode operation delivering beam to both the antiproton source for pbar production and to the NuMI[1] target for neutrino production since 2005. On January 2008 the slip stacking process used to increase the beam to the pbar target was expanded to include the beam to the NuMI target increasing the MI beam power at 120 GeV to 400KW. The current high power MI operation will be described along with the plans to increase the power to 700KW for NOvA and to 2.1 MW for project X.
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