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Title: UNIVERSITY RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN ROBOTICS, TECHNOLOGIES FOR MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS IN DIRECTED STOCKPILE WORK RADIATION AND ENGINEERING CAMPAIGNS - 2005-06 FINAL ANNUAL REPORT

Abstract

The research performed by the University of Florida (UF) is directed to the development of technologies that can be utilized at a micro-scale in varied environments. Work is focused on micro-scale energy systems, visualization, and mechanical devices. This work will impact the NNSA need related to micro-assembly operations. The URPR activities are executed in a University environment, yet many applications of the resulting technologies may be classified or highly restrictive in nature. The NNSA robotics technologists apply an NNSA needs focus to the URPR research, and actively work to transition relevant research into the deployment projects in which they are involved. This provides a “Research to Development to Application” structure within which innovative research has maximum opportunity for impact without requiring URPR researchers to be involved in specific NNSA projects. URPR researchers need to be aware of the NNSA applications in order to ensure the research being conducted has relevance, the URPR shall rely upon the NNSA sites for direction.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Florida
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
895620
Report Number(s):
DOE04NA25588; Annual Report 2005-06
A001; TRN: US0703486
DOE Contract Number:  
FG52-04NA25588
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; 73 NUCLEAR PHYSICS AND RADIATION PHYSICS; 42 ENGINEERING; ENERGY SYSTEMS; RADIATIONS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; STOCKPILES; Robotics; MEMS power supplies; MEMS Imaging; MEMS manipulation and micro-manufacturing

Citation Formats

James S. Tulenko, Dean Schoenfeld, David Hintenlang, Carl Crane, Shannon Ridgeway, Jose Santiago, and Charles Scheer. UNIVERSITY RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN ROBOTICS, TECHNOLOGIES FOR MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS IN DIRECTED STOCKPILE WORK RADIATION AND ENGINEERING CAMPAIGNS - 2005-06 FINAL ANNUAL REPORT. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/895620.
James S. Tulenko, Dean Schoenfeld, David Hintenlang, Carl Crane, Shannon Ridgeway, Jose Santiago, & Charles Scheer. UNIVERSITY RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN ROBOTICS, TECHNOLOGIES FOR MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS IN DIRECTED STOCKPILE WORK RADIATION AND ENGINEERING CAMPAIGNS - 2005-06 FINAL ANNUAL REPORT. United States. doi:10.2172/895620.
James S. Tulenko, Dean Schoenfeld, David Hintenlang, Carl Crane, Shannon Ridgeway, Jose Santiago, and Charles Scheer. Thu . "UNIVERSITY RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN ROBOTICS, TECHNOLOGIES FOR MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS IN DIRECTED STOCKPILE WORK RADIATION AND ENGINEERING CAMPAIGNS - 2005-06 FINAL ANNUAL REPORT". United States. doi:10.2172/895620. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/895620.
@article{osti_895620,
title = {UNIVERSITY RESEARCH PROGRAMS IN ROBOTICS, TECHNOLOGIES FOR MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS IN DIRECTED STOCKPILE WORK RADIATION AND ENGINEERING CAMPAIGNS - 2005-06 FINAL ANNUAL REPORT},
author = {James S. Tulenko and Dean Schoenfeld and David Hintenlang and Carl Crane and Shannon Ridgeway and Jose Santiago and Charles Scheer},
abstractNote = {The research performed by the University of Florida (UF) is directed to the development of technologies that can be utilized at a micro-scale in varied environments. Work is focused on micro-scale energy systems, visualization, and mechanical devices. This work will impact the NNSA need related to micro-assembly operations. The URPR activities are executed in a University environment, yet many applications of the resulting technologies may be classified or highly restrictive in nature. The NNSA robotics technologists apply an NNSA needs focus to the URPR research, and actively work to transition relevant research into the deployment projects in which they are involved. This provides a “Research to Development to Application” structure within which innovative research has maximum opportunity for impact without requiring URPR researchers to be involved in specific NNSA projects. URPR researchers need to be aware of the NNSA applications in order to ensure the research being conducted has relevance, the URPR shall rely upon the NNSA sites for direction.},
doi = {10.2172/895620},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {11}
}