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Title: Demonstration of a PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia

Abstract

This project involved the installation of a 200kW PC25C{trademark} phosphoric-acid fuel cell power plant at Orgenergogaz, a Gazprom industrial site in Russia. In April 1997, a PC25C{trademark} was sold by ONSI Corporation to Orgenergogaz, a subsidiary of the Russian company ''Gazprom''. Due to instabilities in the Russian financial markets, at that time, the unit was never installed and started by Orgenergogaz. In October of 2001 International Fuel Cells (IFC), now known as UTC Fuel Cells (UTCFC), received a financial assistance award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entitled ''Demonstration of PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia''. Three major tasks were part of this award: the inspection of the proposed site and system, start-up assistance, and installation and operation of the powerplant.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
UTC Fuel Cells, LLC
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
860867
DOE Contract Number:
FG26-01NT41349
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; FINANCING; FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS; FUEL CELLS; PHOSPHORIC ACID; START-UP

Citation Formats

John C. Trocciola, Thomas N. Pompa, and Linda S. Boyd. Demonstration of a PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia. United States: N. p., 2004. Web. doi:10.2172/860867.
John C. Trocciola, Thomas N. Pompa, & Linda S. Boyd. Demonstration of a PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia. United States. doi:10.2172/860867.
John C. Trocciola, Thomas N. Pompa, and Linda S. Boyd. Wed . "Demonstration of a PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia". United States. doi:10.2172/860867. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/860867.
@article{osti_860867,
title = {Demonstration of a PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia},
author = {John C. Trocciola and Thomas N. Pompa and Linda S. Boyd},
abstractNote = {This project involved the installation of a 200kW PC25C{trademark} phosphoric-acid fuel cell power plant at Orgenergogaz, a Gazprom industrial site in Russia. In April 1997, a PC25C{trademark} was sold by ONSI Corporation to Orgenergogaz, a subsidiary of the Russian company ''Gazprom''. Due to instabilities in the Russian financial markets, at that time, the unit was never installed and started by Orgenergogaz. In October of 2001 International Fuel Cells (IFC), now known as UTC Fuel Cells (UTCFC), received a financial assistance award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entitled ''Demonstration of PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia''. Three major tasks were part of this award: the inspection of the proposed site and system, start-up assistance, and installation and operation of the powerplant.},
doi = {10.2172/860867},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2004},
month = {Wed Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 2004}
}

Technical Report:

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