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Title: Energy crisis: world struggle for power and wealth

Abstract

The thesis of this book is that there is no real energy crisis, i.e., no physical shortage of energy resources. The scarcity is instead artificially contrived by forces operating within the framework of the international capitalistic economy. In the short run these forces may cooperate for immediate self-interest, but the short-run ''equilibrium'' is considered to be inherently unstable. The international energy crisis is viewed as a ''classical example of the irrationalities of the international capitalist system.'' The energy situation can be resolved by: 1) use of armed force to drive down the price of oil; or 2) an international depression, the more likely result. To understand the reasons for this expectation, the major components of the world energy scene are examined, including the international oil companies and their home governments; the oil exporting countries, western Europe and Japan, the Communist countries, and the oil importing third world. Discussion is also presented on the supply and demand of world energy resources, recent events and future prospects, and energy in a rational world. (125 references) (BYB)

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
7197959
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 02 PETROLEUM; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; PETROLEUM; ENERGY DEMAND; ENERGY POLICY; ENERGY SHORTAGES; ECONOMICS; ENERGY SUPPLIES; EUROPE; JAPAN; OPEC; TRADE; PETROLEUM INDUSTRY; ENERGY SOURCES; FORECASTING; ASIA; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; INDUSTRY; INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; 290000* - Energy Planning & Policy; 294002 - Energy Planning & Policy- Petroleum; 530100 - Environmental-Social Aspects of Energy Technologies- Social & Economic Studies- (-1989); 021000 - Petroleum- Legislation & Regulations

Citation Formats

Tanzer, M. Energy crisis: world struggle for power and wealth. United States: N. p., 1974. Web.
Tanzer, M. Energy crisis: world struggle for power and wealth. United States.
Tanzer, M. Tue . "Energy crisis: world struggle for power and wealth". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_7197959,
title = {Energy crisis: world struggle for power and wealth},
author = {Tanzer, M.},
abstractNote = {The thesis of this book is that there is no real energy crisis, i.e., no physical shortage of energy resources. The scarcity is instead artificially contrived by forces operating within the framework of the international capitalistic economy. In the short run these forces may cooperate for immediate self-interest, but the short-run ''equilibrium'' is considered to be inherently unstable. The international energy crisis is viewed as a ''classical example of the irrationalities of the international capitalist system.'' The energy situation can be resolved by: 1) use of armed force to drive down the price of oil; or 2) an international depression, the more likely result. To understand the reasons for this expectation, the major components of the world energy scene are examined, including the international oil companies and their home governments; the oil exporting countries, western Europe and Japan, the Communist countries, and the oil importing third world. Discussion is also presented on the supply and demand of world energy resources, recent events and future prospects, and energy in a rational world. (125 references) (BYB)},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1974},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1974}
}

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