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Title: Aspects of the regulation of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver

Abstract

Factors involved in regulation of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation were examined using liver slices. Fatty acid oxidation was measured as the conversion of l-(/sup 14/C) palmitate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and total (/sup 14/C) acid-soluble metabolites. Extended (5 to 7 d) fasting of Holstein cows had relatively little effect on palmitate oxidation to acid-soluble metabolites by liver slices, although oxidation to CO/sup 2/ was decreased. Feeding a restricted roughage, high concentrate ration to lactating cows resulted in inhibition of palmitate oxidation. Insulin, glucose, and acetate inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. The authors suggest the regulation of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation may be less dependent on hormonally induced alterations in enzyme activity as observed in rat liver and more dependent upon action of rumen fermentation products or their metabolites on enzyme systems involved in fatty acid oxidation.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing
OSTI Identifier:
6942167
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Dairy Sci.; (United States); Journal Volume: 69:9
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; HEXADECANOIC ACID; METABOLISM; ACETATES; CARBON 14 COMPOUNDS; CARBON DIOXIDE; CATTLE; GLUCOSE; INSULIN; LIVER; METABOLITES; RESPONSE MODIFYING FACTORS; TRACER TECHNIQUES; ALDEHYDES; ANIMALS; BODY; CARBOHYDRATES; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CARBOXYLIC ACID SALTS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CHALCOGENIDES; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DOMESTIC ANIMALS; GLANDS; HEXOSES; HORMONES; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; MAMMALS; MONOCARBOXYLIC ACIDS; MONOSACCHARIDES; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PEPTIDE HORMONES; RUMINANTS; SACCHARIDES; VERTEBRATES; 550501* - Metabolism- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Jesse, B.W., Emery, R.S., and Thomas, J.W. Aspects of the regulation of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver. United States: N. p., 1986. Web. doi:10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(86)80668-3.
Jesse, B.W., Emery, R.S., & Thomas, J.W. Aspects of the regulation of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver. United States. doi:10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(86)80668-3.
Jesse, B.W., Emery, R.S., and Thomas, J.W. Mon . "Aspects of the regulation of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver". United States. doi:10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(86)80668-3.
@article{osti_6942167,
title = {Aspects of the regulation of long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver},
author = {Jesse, B.W. and Emery, R.S. and Thomas, J.W.},
abstractNote = {Factors involved in regulation of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation were examined using liver slices. Fatty acid oxidation was measured as the conversion of l-(/sup 14/C) palmitate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and total (/sup 14/C) acid-soluble metabolites. Extended (5 to 7 d) fasting of Holstein cows had relatively little effect on palmitate oxidation to acid-soluble metabolites by liver slices, although oxidation to CO/sup 2/ was decreased. Feeding a restricted roughage, high concentrate ration to lactating cows resulted in inhibition of palmitate oxidation. Insulin, glucose, and acetate inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. The authors suggest the regulation of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation may be less dependent on hormonally induced alterations in enzyme activity as observed in rat liver and more dependent upon action of rumen fermentation products or their metabolites on enzyme systems involved in fatty acid oxidation.},
doi = {10.3168/jds.S0022-0302(86)80668-3},
journal = {J. Dairy Sci.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 69:9,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1986},
month = {Mon Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1986}
}
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