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Title: Metabolism of circulating renin by liver and kidney of rats

Abstract

Rat renal renin, highly purified and labeled with /sup 125/I, was intravenously given to conscious rats, to study the fate of the circulating renin. Rat antirenin antiserum was used to identify the labeled renin. The disappearance of (/sup 125/I)-renin from the plasma showed two exponential components and the metabolic clearance rate was 11.4 +/- 1.0 ml/min/kg. Both 70% hepatectomy and bilateral nephrectomy decreased the clearance rate by about 50%. (/sup 125/I)-renin accumulated mainly in the liver and kidney, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated the degradation of (/sup 125/I)-renin by these organs. Biliary excretion of (/sup 125/I)-renin was negligible and urinary excretion accounted for 2% of the injected dose. Light- and electron-microscopic autoradiography indicated that (/sup 125/I)-renin is taken up mainly by Kupffer cells and proximal convoluted tubular cells in the liver and kidney, respectively, and thereafter distributes to the lysosomes. In conclusion, both the liver and kidney are responsible for the clearance of circulating renin.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Osaka City Univ. Medical School (Japan)
OSTI Identifier:
6924403
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6924403
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Cardiovasc. Pharmacol.; (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; RENIN; METABOLISM; AUTORADIOGRAPHY; CLEARANCE; INTRAVENOUS INJECTION; IODINE 125; KIDNEYS; LABELLED COMPOUNDS; LIQUID COLUMN CHROMATOGRAPHY; LIVER; RATS; ANIMALS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BODY; CHROMATOGRAPHY; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; ENZYMES; GLANDS; HYDROLASES; INJECTION; INTAKE; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; IODINE ISOTOPES; ISOTOPES; MAMMALS; NONSPECIFIC PEPTIDASES; NUCLEI; ODD-EVEN NUCLEI; ORGANS; PEPTIDE HYDROLASES; RADIOISOTOPES; RODENTS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; VERTEBRATES 550501* -- Metabolism-- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Kim, S., Iwao, H., Nakamura, N., Ikemoto, F., Yamamoto, K., Mizuhira, V., and Yokofujita, J.. Metabolism of circulating renin by liver and kidney of rats. United States: N. p., 1987. Web. doi:10.1097/00005344-198706107-00016.
Kim, S., Iwao, H., Nakamura, N., Ikemoto, F., Yamamoto, K., Mizuhira, V., & Yokofujita, J.. Metabolism of circulating renin by liver and kidney of rats. United States. doi:10.1097/00005344-198706107-00016.
Kim, S., Iwao, H., Nakamura, N., Ikemoto, F., Yamamoto, K., Mizuhira, V., and Yokofujita, J.. Thu . "Metabolism of circulating renin by liver and kidney of rats". United States. doi:10.1097/00005344-198706107-00016.
@article{osti_6924403,
title = {Metabolism of circulating renin by liver and kidney of rats},
author = {Kim, S. and Iwao, H. and Nakamura, N. and Ikemoto, F. and Yamamoto, K. and Mizuhira, V. and Yokofujita, J.},
abstractNote = {Rat renal renin, highly purified and labeled with /sup 125/I, was intravenously given to conscious rats, to study the fate of the circulating renin. Rat antirenin antiserum was used to identify the labeled renin. The disappearance of (/sup 125/I)-renin from the plasma showed two exponential components and the metabolic clearance rate was 11.4 +/- 1.0 ml/min/kg. Both 70% hepatectomy and bilateral nephrectomy decreased the clearance rate by about 50%. (/sup 125/I)-renin accumulated mainly in the liver and kidney, and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis indicated the degradation of (/sup 125/I)-renin by these organs. Biliary excretion of (/sup 125/I)-renin was negligible and urinary excretion accounted for 2% of the injected dose. Light- and electron-microscopic autoradiography indicated that (/sup 125/I)-renin is taken up mainly by Kupffer cells and proximal convoluted tubular cells in the liver and kidney, respectively, and thereafter distributes to the lysosomes. In conclusion, both the liver and kidney are responsible for the clearance of circulating renin.},
doi = {10.1097/00005344-198706107-00016},
journal = {J. Cardiovasc. Pharmacol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1987},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1987}
}
  • Hepatic and renal levels of citrate were followed in rats poisoned with fluoroacetate and injected intraperitoneally with the radioprotective agents cysteamine (10 mg/100 g) or cystamine 112 mg/100 g). Hepatic citrate level was also followed in rats irradiated with 800 to 850 r and injected with cysteamine before or after irradiation. The accumulation of citrate in kidney induced by fluoroacetate was diminished by pretreatment with cysteamine, but its effect on the kidney may be caused by the circularory changes it produces. Cystamine was similarly effective in reducing renal citrare. Cysteamine, but not cystamine, increased liver citrate levels, thus appeared tomore » aggravate the action of the poison on liver cells. Cystamine, but not cysteamine, diminished hepatic citrate when given before or after irradiation and injection of fluoroacetate. Cystamine, but not cysteamine, augmented the ability of rats to acetylate sulfanilamide. The results show that these 2 compounds may have quite different effects. They may protect agalnst fluoroacetate poisoning by modifying the distribution of coenzyme A or indirectly by altering hormone secretion, since citrate accumulation is influenced by castration and adrenalectomy. (H.R.D.)« less
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