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Title: Bibliography of literature relevant to the reassessment of A-bomb radiation dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki

Abstract

Radiation doses received by the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings were estimated in increasingly sophisticated studies between 1950 and 1965. The latest of these estimates, designated as Tentative 1965 Doses or simply T65D values, were used as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970's. The T65D values have recently been subjected to critical review as a result of concern over possible changes in radiation protection standards. Thus, it is essential that the reassessment of A-bomb radiation dosimetry is well-documented and that the results are convincing to the scientific community. This bibliography provides a keyword index, author index, and master listing of over 100 published reports dealing with different aspects of the dosimetry reassessment effort.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6915173
Report Number(s):
ORNL/TM-9138
ON: DE84010667
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; HIROSHIMA; A-BOMB SURVIVORS; NAGASAKI; PERSONNEL DOSIMETRY; BIBLIOGRAPHIES; RADIATION DOSES; ASIA; DOCUMENT TYPES; DOSES; DOSIMETRY; HUMAN POPULATIONS; JAPAN; POPULATIONS 560151* -- Radiation Effects on Animals-- Man

Citation Formats

Kerr, G.D. Bibliography of literature relevant to the reassessment of A-bomb radiation dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Kerr, G.D. Bibliography of literature relevant to the reassessment of A-bomb radiation dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. United States.
Kerr, G.D. 1984. "Bibliography of literature relevant to the reassessment of A-bomb radiation dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6915173,
title = {Bibliography of literature relevant to the reassessment of A-bomb radiation dosimetry in Hiroshima and Nagasaki},
author = {Kerr, G.D.},
abstractNote = {Radiation doses received by the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings were estimated in increasingly sophisticated studies between 1950 and 1965. The latest of these estimates, designated as Tentative 1965 Doses or simply T65D values, were used as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970's. The T65D values have recently been subjected to critical review as a result of concern over possible changes in radiation protection standards. Thus, it is essential that the reassessment of A-bomb radiation dosimetry is well-documented and that the results are convincing to the scientific community. This bibliography provides a keyword index, author index, and master listing of over 100 published reports dealing with different aspects of the dosimetry reassessment effort.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 4
}

Technical Report:
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  • The presentations at this workshop are the first of a series of joint efforts, among knowledgeable scientists in Japan and the United States under RERF auspices, directed toward reassessing the dose of ionizing radiation received by survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The last previous dose estimate revisions occurred in 1965 and since that time new technology and understanding have become available for this purpose. It is the hope of RERF that the collaboration represented by this workshop and the following day of free discussion among the participating scientists will establish a procedure which will ensuremore » that the resulting dose estimates are as accurate as possible. Acceptance of the resulting estimates by the scientific communities of both nations is our ultimate goal. This first workshop has concentrated on presenting current evidence concerning the yield of the two weapons, the spectra of the radiations from them, their transport through air, and various in situ measurements of the resulting excitation of materials on the ground (insulators, roof tiles, iron rods, etc.) which can be used to check the theoretical calculations.« less
  • One of the most important issues of the nuclear age concerns the effects of ionizing radiation on man. Immediately after the cessation of fighting in Japan in World War II, studies began which were aimed at learning as much as possible about radiation effects on the survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombings. The most important factors were the immediate and long-term effects of the varying doses of radiation to the survivors. Although the medical studies commenced within months of the bombings, it was ten years before technology reached the stage at which it appeared possible to determine with anymore » real reliability the effect the radiation doses had on these people. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission and subsequently the Energy Research and Development Administration supported and strongly encouraged medical and dosimetry studies of the survivors until 1975 when the United States and Japan joined as full partners to carry on the studies far into the future. During the last few years, reliable doses for most of the individual survivors have been obtained, and the door was opened to a much better understanding of the effects of radiation on human beings. The dosimetry portion of these studies is recorded in this monograph. In this review the author presents an interesting mixture of historical highlights and scientific information without trying to cover either subject in great depth. The objective is to give the reader some insight and understanding into the overall program and to identify the original publications for those seeking an in-depth analysis.« less
  • This report summarizes the present state of knowledge in dosimetry of the survivors of the bombings at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Data on the physical factors involv in the two cities and on attenuation of radiation by vario shielding situations are presented. This information is being used to estimate a tentative radiation dose to individual atomic bomb survivors. lt should be emphasized the many important problems remain to be solved before accurate doses can be assigned to individual survivors. Such information will greatly atrengthen the investigation of biologic consequences of instantaneous doses of and neutron irradiation in man. (auth)
  • This paper investigates the quantitative relationship of ionizing radiation to the occurrence of posterior lenticular opacities among the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki suggested by the DS86 dosimetry system. DS86 doses are available for 1983 (93.4%) of the 2124 atomic bomb survivors analyzed in 1982. The DS86 kerma neutron component for Hiroshima survivors is much smaller than its comparable T65DR component, but still 4.2-fold higher (0.38 Gy at 6 Gy) than that in Nagasaki (0.09 Gy at 6 Gy). Thus, if the eye is especially sensitive to neutrons, there may yet be some useful information onmore » their effects, particularly in Hiroshima. The dose-response relationship has been evaluated as a function of the separately estimated gamma-ray and neutron doses. Among several different dose-response models without and with two thresholds, we have selected as the best model the one with the smallest x2 or the largest log likelihood value associated with the goodness of fit. The best fit is a linear gamma-linear neutron relationship which assumes different thresholds for the two types of radiation. Both gamma and neutron regression coefficients for the best fitting model are positive and highly significant for the estimated DS86 eye organ dose.« less