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Title: Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry

Abstract

An all important datum in risk assessment is the radiation dose to individual survivors of the bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first set of dose estimates for survivors was based on a dosimetry system developed in 1957 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These Tentative 1957 Doses (T57D) were later replaced by a more extensive and refined set of Tentative 1965 Doses (T65D). The T65D system of dose estimation for survivors was also developed at ORNL and served as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970s. In the late 1970s, it was suggested that there were serious inadequacies with the T65D system, and these inadequacies were the topic of discussion at two symposia held in 1981. In early 1983, joint US- Japan research programs were established to conduct a thorough review of all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. A number of important contributions to this review were made by ORNL staff members. The review was completed in 1986 and a new Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) was adopted for use. This paper discusses the development of the various systems of A-bomb survivor dosimetry, and the status of the current DS86 systemmore » as it is being applied in the medical follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors and their offspring.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
204649
Report Number(s):
CONF-9510300-2
ON: DE96005728; TRN: 96:008604
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Schull symposium, Houston, TX (United States), 7-10 Oct 1995; Other Information: PBD: [1995]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; A-BOMB SURVIVORS; DOSIMETRY; DELAYED RADIATION EFFECTS; HISTORICAL ASPECTS; HIROSHIMA; NAGASAKI; RADIATION DOSES; RADIATION HAZARDS; EPIDEMIOLOGY; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; CATARACTS; LEUKEMIA

Citation Formats

Kerr, G.D. Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Kerr, G.D. Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry. United States.
Kerr, G.D. Sun . "Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/204649.
@article{osti_204649,
title = {Development of A-bomb survivor dosimetry},
author = {Kerr, G.D.},
abstractNote = {An all important datum in risk assessment is the radiation dose to individual survivors of the bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The first set of dose estimates for survivors was based on a dosimetry system developed in 1957 by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). These Tentative 1957 Doses (T57D) were later replaced by a more extensive and refined set of Tentative 1965 Doses (T65D). The T65D system of dose estimation for survivors was also developed at ORNL and served as a basis for risk assessment throughout the 1970s. In the late 1970s, it was suggested that there were serious inadequacies with the T65D system, and these inadequacies were the topic of discussion at two symposia held in 1981. In early 1983, joint US- Japan research programs were established to conduct a thorough review of all aspects of the radiation dosimetry for the Hiroshima and Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. A number of important contributions to this review were made by ORNL staff members. The review was completed in 1986 and a new Dosimetry System 1986 (DS86) was adopted for use. This paper discusses the development of the various systems of A-bomb survivor dosimetry, and the status of the current DS86 system as it is being applied in the medical follow-up studies of the A-bomb survivors and their offspring.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995},
month = {Sun Dec 31 00:00:00 EST 1995}
}

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  • A-bomb survivor data have been generally accepted as applicable. Also, the initial radiations have tended to be accepted as the dominant radiation source for all survivors. There was general acceptance of the essential reliability of both the biological effects data and the causative radiation dose values. There are considerations casting doubt on these acceptances, but very little quantification of th implied uncertainties has been attempted. The exception was A-bomb survivor dosimetry, where free-field kerma values for initial radiations were thought to be accurate to about 30%, and doses to individual survivors were treated as effectively error-free. In 1980, a majormore » challenge to the accepted A-bomb survivor dosimetry was announced, and was quickly followed by a succession of explanations and displays showing the soundness of that challenge. In fact, a complete replacement set of free-field kerma values was provided which was suitable for use in constructing an entire new dosimetry for Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The new values showed many changes greater than the accepted 30% uncertainty. An approximate new dosimetry was indeed constructed, and used to convert existing leukemia cause-and-effect data from the old to the new dose values, by way of assessing the impact. (ERB)« less
  • There were several motivations for organizing the SIMS Conference reported in this monograph. Risk assessment and its methods have been subjects of several SIMS Conferences in the recent past, and focusing these newer, more powerful methods on the largest human experience of exposure to ionizing radiation seemed an appropriate sequel. There was also the conviction that the data resources of the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), generated through the mortality and medical follow-up of large samples of the survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, were being under utilized, and that a conference and its proceedings wouldmore » create interest in exploiting this resource. The time seemed ripe for gathering a small group of current RERF scientists, veteran US statisticians and epidemiologists, and others with more recent entry into the field of radiation biology to consider long range plans for maximizing the output of information not only on the long term effects of ionizing radiation on man but on new knowledge of the determinants of health and disease that can be learned by study of the records of this cohort. This seemed particularly appropriate at this time while intensive joint Japanese-US efforts are underway to provide a new, more accurate dosimetry for use in these studies. Finally, there was a hope that an ad hoc forum of this type would provide not only a summary of current statistical and epidemiologic activities at RERF, but a useful critique of their scope and quality.« less
  • Building something which could be called {open_quotes}virtual reality{close_quotes} (VR) is something of a challenge, particularly when nobody really seems to agree on a definition of VR. The author wanted to combine scientific visualization with VR, resulting in an environment useful for assisting scientific research. He demonstrates the combination of VR and scientific visualization in a prototype application. The VR application constructed consists of a dataflow based system for performing scientific visualization (AVS), extensions to the system to support VR input devices and a numerical simulation ported into the dataflow environment. The VR system includes two inexpensive, off-the-shelf VR devices andmore » some custom code. A working system was assembled with about two man-months of effort. The system allows the user to specify parameters for a chemical flooding simulation as well as some viewing parameters using VR input devices, as well as view the output using VR output devices. In chemical flooding, there is a subsurface region that contains chemicals which are to be removed. Secondary oil recovery and environmental remediation are typical applications of chemical flooding. The process assumes one or more injection wells, and one or more production wells. Chemicals or water are pumped into the ground, mobilizing and displacing hydrocarbons or contaminants. The placement of the production and injection wells, and other parameters of the wells, are the most important variables in the simulation.« less
  • The presentations at this workshop are the first of a series of joint efforts, among knowledgeable scientists in Japan and the United States under RERF auspices, directed toward reassessing the dose of ionizing radiation received by survivors of the atomic bombs dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The last previous dose estimate revisions occurred in 1965 and since that time new technology and understanding have become available for this purpose. It is the hope of RERF that the collaboration represented by this workshop and the following day of free discussion among the participating scientists will establish a procedure which will ensuremore » that the resulting dose estimates are as accurate as possible. Acceptance of the resulting estimates by the scientific communities of both nations is our ultimate goal. This first workshop has concentrated on presenting current evidence concerning the yield of the two weapons, the spectra of the radiations from them, their transport through air, and various in situ measurements of the resulting excitation of materials on the ground (insulators, roof tiles, iron rods, etc.) which can be used to check the theoretical calculations.« less
  • A substantial discrepancy exists between the measured values for thermal neutron activation and the values calculated using the new A-bomb dosimetry system, DS86. As part of a joint US-Japan effort aimed at resolving this discrepancy, we have shown that {sup 36}Cl/Cl in mineral samples (i.e., concrete, granite, tiles) can be measured with sufficient precision using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the very low thermal neutron activation levels at distances up to {approximately}2000 m from the hypocenter in Hiroshima. Our initial measurement results show that activation of Cl by the bomb neutrons disagree with calculations based on the new DS86more » dosimetry system, in the same direction as previous findings for Co and Eu. This is a preliminary report of work in progress. The principal objectives of this work are to reconstruct the thermal neutron fluence as a function of distance from the hypocenters in both Hiroshima and Nagasaki using {sup 36}Cl/Cl and obtain information about fast neutron fluence. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.« less