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Title: Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)

Abstract

A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6153453
Report Number(s):
SLAC-PUB-4925; CONF-890335-147
ON: DE89012271
DOE Contract Number:
AC03-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 13. particle accelerator conference, Chicago, IL, USA, 20 Mar 1989; Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; EQUIPMENT PROTECTION DEVICES; DESIGN; STANFORD LINEAR COLLIDER; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; COAXIAL CABLES; ELECTRON BEAMS; MEASURING INSTRUMENTS; MODIFICATIONS; PARTICLE LOSSES; ACCELERATOR FACILITIES; ACCELERATORS; BEAMS; CABLES; CONDUCTOR DEVICES; ELECTRIC CABLES; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; LEPTON BEAMS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; PARTICLE BEAMS; 430300* - Particle Accelerators- Auxiliaries & Components

Citation Formats

Rolfe, J., Gearhart, R., Jacobsen, R., Jenkins, T., McComick, D., Nelson, R., Reagan, D., and Ross, M. Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider). United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Rolfe, J., Gearhart, R., Jacobsen, R., Jenkins, T., McComick, D., Nelson, R., Reagan, D., & Ross, M. Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider). United States.
Rolfe, J., Gearhart, R., Jacobsen, R., Jenkins, T., McComick, D., Nelson, R., Reagan, D., and Ross, M. Wed . "Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6153453.
@article{osti_6153453,
title = {Long ion chamber systems for the SLC (Stanford Linear Collider)},
author = {Rolfe, J. and Gearhart, R. and Jacobsen, R. and Jenkins, T. and McComick, D. and Nelson, R. and Reagan, D. and Ross, M.},
abstractNote = {A Panofsky Long Ion Chamber (PLIC) is essentially a gas-filled coaxial cable, and has been used to protect the Stanford Linear Accelerator from damage caused by its electron beam, and as a sensitive diagnostic tool. This old technology has been updated and has found renewed use in the SLC. PLIC systems have been installed as beam steering aids in most parts of the SLC and are a part of the system that protects the SLC from damage by errant beams in several places. 5 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1989},
month = {Wed Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1989}
}

Conference:
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  • The Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center collides electrons and positrons produced in the linear accelerator pulse by pulse. We determine the energy of each beam by measuring the angle of deflection of the beam in the SLC extraction lines. Each extraction line consists of two bending magnets that produce synchrotron radiation, and a spectrometer analyzing magnet that deflects the beam. We detect the synchrotron light by using the emission of electrons produced by Compton scattering off Cu-Be wires. We detect the {approximately} 180 fC of charge on the wire by using the electronics systemmore » described in this paper. We also discuss the performance of the system, including the equivalent noise charge, cross-talk between channels, stability, and reliability. 4 refs., 7 figs.« less
  • Positrons collected at the SLC positron source are transported over a 2-km path at 220 MeV to be reinjected into the linac for acceleration to 1.2 GeV, the energy of the emittance damping ring. Since the positron bunch length is a significant fraction of a cycle of the linac-accelerating RF, the energy spread at 1.2 GeV is considerably larger than the acceptance of the linac-to-ring (LTR) transport system. Making use of the large pathlength difference at the beginning of the LTR due to this energy spread, a standard SLAC 3-m accelerating section has been installed in the LTR to matchmore » the longitudinal phase space of the positron beam to the acceptance of the damping ring. The design of the matching system is described, and a comparison of operating results within simulations is presented. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • This report presents a brief review of the status of the Stanford Linear Collider. Topics covered are: Beam luminosity, Detectors and backgrounds; and Future prospects. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab. (LSP)
  • A method of precisely determining the beam energy in high energy linear colliders has been developed using dipole spectrometers and synchrotron radiation detectors. Beam lines implementing this method have been installed on the Stanford Linear Collider. An absolute energy measurement with an accuracy of better than deltaE/E = 5 /times/ 10/sup /minus/4/ can be achieved on a pulse-to-pulse basis. The operation of this system will be described. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.
  • In this report we discuss some general optics principles and scaling laws that have been useful in guiding the design and operation of the Final Focus System for the Stanford Linear Collider. Included are expressions for the minimum {Beta}{sub x}* and {Beta}{sub y}* that can be expected for the present SLC design at the interaction point as a function of beam emittance. 6 refs., 13 figs.