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Title: Applications of ultraviolet light in the preparation of platelet concentrates

Abstract

Passenger lymphocytes in platelet concentrates (PCs) may induce the formation of lymphocytotoxic antibodies (LCTAbs) and subsequent refractoriness to platelet transfusions. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can prevent lymphocytes' acting as stimulator or responder cells in mixed-lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) and could theoretically prevent LCTAb formation in vivo. A system has been devised for the delivery of UV irradiation to PCs; platelet storage characteristics and MLRs were evaluated in UV-irradiated PCs harvested from healthy donors with the Haemonetics V50 and PCS cell separators. MLR and response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation were abolished by a dose of 3000 joules per m2 at a mean wavelength of 310 nm. Platelet aggregatory responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ristocetin, collagen and epinephrine, hypotonic shock response, and pH showed no important differences when control PCs and PCs irradiated as above were compared during 5 days of storage in Fenwal PL-1240 packs. Lactate production during storage was significantly higher in UV-treated PCs (p less than 0.001), but values did not exceed 20 mmol per L. UV transmission at 310 nm in standard blood product containers, including the Fenwal PL-146, PL-1240, and PL-732, was low (less than 30%), but it was acceptable in the Delmed Cryostorage and DuPont SteriCell packs (greater thanmore » 50%). UV irradiation may provide a simple and inexpensive means of producing nonimmunogenic PCs.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
South Western Regional Transfusion Centre, Bristol (England)
OSTI Identifier:
5765522
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transfusion (Philadelphia); (United States); Journal Volume: 29:5
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ANTIBODY FORMATION; INHIBITION; BLOOD; STORAGE; BLOOD PLATELETS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; ADP; BLOOD COAGULATION; COLLAGEN; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; LACTATES; LEUKOCYTES; LYMPHOCYTES; MAN; TRANSFUSIONS; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD CELLS; BODY FLUIDS; CARBOXYLIC ACID SALTS; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; NUCLEOTIDES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PRIMATES; PROTEINS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; SCLEROPROTEINS; SOMATIC CELLS; THERAPY; VERTEBRATES; 560120* - Radiation Effects on Biochemicals, Cells, & Tissue Culture

Citation Formats

Pamphilon, D.H., Corbin, S.A., Saunders, J., and Tandy, N.P.. Applications of ultraviolet light in the preparation of platelet concentrates. United States: N. p., 1989. Web. doi:10.1046/j.1537-2995.1989.29589284134.x.
Pamphilon, D.H., Corbin, S.A., Saunders, J., & Tandy, N.P.. Applications of ultraviolet light in the preparation of platelet concentrates. United States. doi:10.1046/j.1537-2995.1989.29589284134.x.
Pamphilon, D.H., Corbin, S.A., Saunders, J., and Tandy, N.P.. 1989. "Applications of ultraviolet light in the preparation of platelet concentrates". United States. doi:10.1046/j.1537-2995.1989.29589284134.x.
@article{osti_5765522,
title = {Applications of ultraviolet light in the preparation of platelet concentrates},
author = {Pamphilon, D.H. and Corbin, S.A. and Saunders, J. and Tandy, N.P.},
abstractNote = {Passenger lymphocytes in platelet concentrates (PCs) may induce the formation of lymphocytotoxic antibodies (LCTAbs) and subsequent refractoriness to platelet transfusions. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can prevent lymphocytes' acting as stimulator or responder cells in mixed-lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) and could theoretically prevent LCTAb formation in vivo. A system has been devised for the delivery of UV irradiation to PCs; platelet storage characteristics and MLRs were evaluated in UV-irradiated PCs harvested from healthy donors with the Haemonetics V50 and PCS cell separators. MLR and response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation were abolished by a dose of 3000 joules per m2 at a mean wavelength of 310 nm. Platelet aggregatory responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ristocetin, collagen and epinephrine, hypotonic shock response, and pH showed no important differences when control PCs and PCs irradiated as above were compared during 5 days of storage in Fenwal PL-1240 packs. Lactate production during storage was significantly higher in UV-treated PCs (p less than 0.001), but values did not exceed 20 mmol per L. UV transmission at 310 nm in standard blood product containers, including the Fenwal PL-146, PL-1240, and PL-732, was low (less than 30%), but it was acceptable in the Delmed Cryostorage and DuPont SteriCell packs (greater than 50%). UV irradiation may provide a simple and inexpensive means of producing nonimmunogenic PCs.},
doi = {10.1046/j.1537-2995.1989.29589284134.x},
journal = {Transfusion (Philadelphia); (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 29:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month = 6
}
  • Ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation abolishes lymphocyte functions (the ability to respond and to stimulate) in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). This effect may have practical application in the prevention or reduction of transfusion-induced alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens. To study this, platelet concentrates (PCs) were obtained with a cell separator, suspended in autologous plasma in a final volume of 400 mL, and transferred into a large (22 X 30 cm) cell culture bag. This plastic showed a good transmittance of UV-B rays at 310 nm (54%). PCs were placed between two quartz plates (surface of irradiation = 25 X 37 cm),more » and the two sides were irradiated simultaneously. Energy delivered to the surface of the plastic bag was automatically monitored. The ability to respond (in MLC and to phytohemagglutinin) and to stimulate allogeneic lymphocytes was completely abolished with energy of 0.75 J per cm2 (irradiation time less than 3 min). The temperature increase during irradiation was negligible. Platelet aggregation (collagen, adrenalin, ADP, arachidonic acid, ristocetin) was not impaired if UV-B energy was below 3 J per cm2. Recovery and survival of autologous 111In-labeled platelets were studied in four volunteers; no differences were found between UV-B-treated (1.5 J/cm2) platelets and untreated platelets. These results show that a large-scale clinical trial using UV-B-irradiated PCs to prevent HLA alloimmunization is feasible.« less
  • Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation of platelet concentrates (PCs) may prevent the development of posttransfusion HLA alloimmunization. As irradiation performed in a blood center or a hospital will probably be associated with a variable postirradiation delay before transfusion, the ability to store PCs after UVB irradiation becomes important. The effects have been studied of a UVB dose of 10,000 mJ per cm2, the dose used in our institution for UVB clinical trials, on PCs pooled and stored for up to 96 hours after irradiation. Results showed that after 96 hours of storage, though there were no changes in pH, platelet count,more » white cell count, percent discharge of lactate dehydrogenase, or {beta}-thromboglobulin, there were significant decreases in morphology score and osmotic recovery. These changes, however, were not evident after 24 hours of storage. Similarly, there was a 60% decrease in immunoreactive membrane glycoprotein (GP) Ib after 96 hours of storage, but these changes were not seen after 48 hours of storage. No changes were seen in levels of GPIIb/IIIa in either group during the 96 hours of storage. On computer-analyzed two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, PCs irradiated at 10,000 mJ per cm2 and stored for 72 hours had changes in over 50 platelet proteins as compared to those proteins in nonirradiated age-matched control PCs. It can be concluded that UVB irradiation of PCs at 10,000 mJ per cm2 does not lead to significant platelet deterioration after short-term storage (24-48 hours) but is likely to be deleterious after long-term (72-96 hours) storage.« less
  • The use of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) and UV-A irradiation to inactivate contaminating donor leukocytes in platelet concentrates and to prevent primary alloimmunization against donor class I major histocompatibility (MHC) antigens in mice was investigated. CBA/CaH-T6J mice with the H2k haplotype and BALB/cByJ mice with the H2d haplotype were used as donors and recipients, respectively. The mixed leukocyte reaction between these two strains of mice showed that treatment of spleen cells with 500 ng/mL 8-MOP and 5J/cm2 UV-A inhibited 99% of responder and 92% of stimulator function. There was no measurable loss of platelet aggregating activity after the treatment. After two weeklymore » transfusions of platelets without any treatment, 93% of control mice (n = 15) developed anti-H2k antibody. In contrast, only 33% of mice (n = 15) receiving platelets treated with 8-MOP and UV-A became alloimmunized. After six weekly platelet transfusions, all mice became alloimmunized. Nevertheless, the mean titers of anti-H2k antibody in sera of the treated groups were significantly lower than the control groups. One hour posttransfusion recoveries of 51Cr-labeled donor platelets were also higher in mice transfused with the treated platelets. Thus, the pretreatment of platelet concentrates with 8-MOP and UV-A irradiation effectively reduced the alloantigenicity of class I MHC molecules. The implication of this finding in relation to the mechanism by which donor leukocytes allosensitize recipients is discussed.« less
  • Transmission of viral diseases through blood products remains an unsolved problem in transfusion medicine. We have developed a psoralen photochemical system for decontamination of platelet concentrates in which platelets are treated with long wavelength ultraviolet radiation (UVA, 320-400 nm) in the presence of 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP). Bacteria, RNA viruses, and DNA viruses ranging in genome size from 1.2 x 10(6) daltons, encompassing the size range of human pathogens, were inoculated into platelet concentrates and subjected to treatment. This system inactivated 25 to 30 logs/h of bacteria Escherichia coli or Staphylococcus aureus, 6 logs/h of bacteriophage fd, 0.9 log/h of bacteriophage R17more » and 1.1 logs/h of feline leukemia virus (FeLV) in platelet concentrates maintained in standard storage bags. Platelet integrity and in vitro function before, immediately following photochemical treatment, and during prolonged storage after treatment, were evaluated by measuring: (1) extracellular pH; (2) platelet yields; (3) extracellular lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels; (4) platelet morphology; (5) platelet aggregation responsiveness; (6) thromboxane beta-2 (TXB-2) production; (7) dense body secretion; and (8) alpha granule secretion. These assays demonstrated that this photochemical inactivation system inactivated bacteria and viruses in platelet concentrates with minimal adverse effects on the in vitro function of platelets in comparison to untreated control concentrates maintained under current, standard blood bank conditions.« less
  • Several plastic materials used in blood storage were evaluated for their ability to transmit ultraviolet B (UVB) light. A plastic bag manufactured from sheets of transparent Teflon efficiently (78-86%) transmitted UVB light and was employed in subsequent functional studies of lymphocytes and platelets exposed to UVB light while contained in these bags. In vitro experiments showed a UVB dose-dependent abrogation of lymphocyte responder and stimulator functions, with concurrent preservation of platelet aggregation responses. In a phase I pilot study, UVB-treated platelet concentrates were administered to four bone marrow transplant recipients. Adverse effects attributable to the transfusions were not observed, andmore » patients showed clinically effective transfusion responses. No patient developed lymphocytotoxic HLA or platelet antibodies. These studies suggest that platelets can be effectively irradiated with UVB light in a closed system. However, numerous variables, including container material, volume and composition of contents, steady exposure versus agitation, and exact UV wavelength, must be considered.« less