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Title: Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans

Abstract

Experiments were initiated to determine whether human NK cells are cytotoxic to C. albicans with similar activity observed for mouse NK cells against the yeast Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. In 48 hour assays using limiting dilutions of C. albicans, strain 3153A, mononuclear leukocytes with NK activity had only marginal effects on yeast outgrowth, whereas granulocytes killed most of the yeast. However, these yeast were able to block NK activity in 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assays with K562 cells, at yeast to K562 ratios of 10:1 and 100:1. Yeast pretreated with the serum of the majority of donors blocked the NK activity more than untreated yeast. Two of the 7 donors did not enhance NK inhibition after pretreatment of the yeast with their serum. Serum antibody to C. albicans and complement consumption by the yeast correlated with the relative efficiency of NK inhibition for most donors. This report suggests that there may be in vivo interactions between NK cells of the immune system and opportunistic fungal pathogens, which may compromise NK cell function.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Nevada, Reno
OSTI Identifier:
5495214
Report Number(s):
CONF-8604222-
Journal ID: CODEN: FEPRA; TRN: 86-026756
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Fed. Proc., Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 45:3; Conference: 70. annual meeting of the Federation of American Society for Experimental Biology, St. Louis, MO, USA, 13 Apr 1986
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CANDIDA; CELL KILLING; LYMPHOCYTES; INHIBITION; ANTIBODIES; BIOLOGICAL FUNCTIONS; CHROMIUM 51; COMPLEMENT; MAN; MICE; RETICULOENDOTHELIAL SYSTEM; TRACER TECHNIQUES; YEASTS; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMAL TISSUES; ANIMALS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BLOOD CELLS; BODY; BODY FLUIDS; CHROMIUM ISOTOPES; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; FUNCTIONS; FUNGI; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; ISOTOPES; LEUKOCYTES; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; MICROORGANISMS; NUCLEI; PLANTS; PRIMATES; RADIOISOTOPES; RODENTS; SOMATIC CELLS; TISSUES; VERTEBRATES; 551001* - Physiological Systems- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Zunino, S., and Hudig, D.. Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Zunino, S., & Hudig, D.. Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans. United States.
Zunino, S., and Hudig, D.. 1986. "Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5495214,
title = {Inhibition of human natural killer (NK) cytotoxicity by Candida albicans},
author = {Zunino, S. and Hudig, D.},
abstractNote = {Experiments were initiated to determine whether human NK cells are cytotoxic to C. albicans with similar activity observed for mouse NK cells against the yeast Paracoccidiodes brasiliensis. In 48 hour assays using limiting dilutions of C. albicans, strain 3153A, mononuclear leukocytes with NK activity had only marginal effects on yeast outgrowth, whereas granulocytes killed most of the yeast. However, these yeast were able to block NK activity in 4 hr /sup 51/Cr release assays with K562 cells, at yeast to K562 ratios of 10:1 and 100:1. Yeast pretreated with the serum of the majority of donors blocked the NK activity more than untreated yeast. Two of the 7 donors did not enhance NK inhibition after pretreatment of the yeast with their serum. Serum antibody to C. albicans and complement consumption by the yeast correlated with the relative efficiency of NK inhibition for most donors. This report suggests that there may be in vivo interactions between NK cells of the immune system and opportunistic fungal pathogens, which may compromise NK cell function.},
doi = {},
journal = {Fed. Proc., Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 45:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 3
}

Conference:
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  • Natural killer (NK) activity is mediated by a subpopulation of cells termed large granular lymphocytes (LGL), which exhibit cytotoxic activity against a variety of tumor targets. LGL express OKT8, OKT9, OKT10, OKT11, 3G8 (Fc..gamma..R), OKM1, NKH1. The addition of recombinant IL-2 (rIL-2), increases cytotoxicity, induces IFN-..gamma.. production and leads to LGL proliferation. Since monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) represent highly specific probes to analyze possible surface molecules, they have studied the role of various MoAbs in the regulation of cytotoxicity, proliferation, and secretory function of purified LGL. LGL were isolated from nonadherent human peripheral blood leukocytes on discontinuous Percoll density gradients, followedmore » by 29/sup 0/C E-rosette depletion of contaminating T cells. These preparations were greater than or equal to 85% LGL and contained greater than or equal to 5% OKT3/sup +/ cells. Using a limiting dilution assay, purified LGL were incubated with rIL-2 and the MoAbs (10 ..mu..g/ml) for 7 days. These cells were tested for cytotoxicity against K562 in a /sup 51/Cr/sup -/ release assay, and for proliferation as determined by /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation. Results indicate that the OKT9 antibody inhibited both the cytotoxicity and proliferation. MoAb against LGl markers (OKT11, OKT8, OKM1, 3G8, and NKH1) had no effect on cytotoxicity or proliferation. Unlike the T cell receptor complex (with OKT3), the surface molecules examined do not regulate LGL lysis or proliferation.« less
  • Because previous work has suggested that NK cells may be important in host resistance against the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii we examined whether human NK cells and lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells have activity against trophozoites and cysts of this organism in vitro. A method to radiolabel Toxoplasma trophozoites with 51Cr was developed and direct cytotoxic activity was determined by using modifications of the standard 51Cr release assay. Viability of 51Cr-labeled trophozoites assessed by both methylene blue staining and trypan blue exclusion was greater than 90%. Significantly more 51Cr was released by anti-Toxoplasma antibody and C than by antibody in themore » absence of C. Incubation of trophozoites with freshly isolated human NK cells or NK cells activated with either rIL-2 or rIFN-alpha did not result in significant release of 51Cr (specific lysis was 0 to 2.3%). In contrast, the average specific lysis of radiolabeled trophozoites by LAK cells was significant. In a series of separate experiments, preincubation of radiolabeled trophozoites with heat-inactivated normal or Toxoplasma antibody-positive human serum increased the cytotoxicity of LAK cells from a mean specific lysis of 15% +/- 4.5 to 39% +/- 8.5, respectively, as assessed by 51Cr release. Because previous work has shown that radioisotope release from parasites may be nonspecific, separate experiments were performed to determine the cytotoxicity of LAK cells against antibody-coated trophozoites by using ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining to assess effector cell damage. LAK cells had a mean specific lysis of 51% against antibody-coated trophozoites by ethidium bromide-acridine orange staining. Preincubation with heat-inactivated Toxoplasma-antibody positive human serum did not increase activity of rIL-2-activated NK cells against 51CR-labeled trophozoites.« less
  • Cyclosporine I.V. (CIV), in its vehicle, Cremophor EL, (CEL), is a potent immunosuppressive agent which prolongs survival of allogeneic transplants. NKCC is postulated to be involved in allograft rejection. This study was designed to investigate the effect of CEL, a polyoxyethylated castor oil, on in vitro spontaneous cytotoxicity induced by human natural killer cells. NKCC was measured by a standard /sup 51/Cr release assay with K562 target cells. After a 4 hr NKCC assay, both CIV at 10/sup -3/M to 10/sup -7/M and CEL at the equivalent dilution, suppressed NKCC 46 to 6%, relative to control lysis (p 0.05). Theremore » was no significant suppression of NKCC at dilutions greater than 10/sup -7/M. The differences in NKCC between CIV and CEL at all dilutions tested were not significant. Both CIV and CEL with increasing dilutions correlated negatively with NKCC (r = -0.67, p < 0.0001; r = -0.74, p < 0.0001, respectively). With a 4 hr preincubation, both CIV at 10/sup -4/M and CEL at the equivalent dilution suppressed NKCC (p < 0.01). However, after a 24 hr preincubation of CIV and CEL, NKCC did not differ from control lysis. These data suggest that the CIV vehicle CEL transiently suppresses in vitro NKCC and, therefore, may play a role in the survival of allogeneic transplants.« less
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  • In vitro exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to ultraviolet B (uvB) radiation has been shown to inhibit natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent fashion. The purpose of this study was to examine the manner by which uvB produced these deleterious effects. Inhibition of NK activity was not due to lethal injury to NK cells since the viability of cell populations enriched for NK activity was greater than 90% with the uvB doses employed. uvB appeared to directly affect NK cells since procedures which removed suppressor mechanisms, such as removal of monocytes and pharmacologic inhibition ofmore » the cyclooxygenase pathway, failed to reverse the response. Furthermore, no suppression of activity of unirradiated NK cells could be produced by coincubation of unirradiated NK cells with uv-irradiated NK cells. When the single cell assay for binding and killing was employed to determine at which stage in the lytic sequence inhibition occurred, it was found that binding was normal but lysis of bound targets and the recycling capacity of active NK cells were markedly reduced. At uvB doses above 50 J/m2, both interferon alpha (IFN-alpha) and interleukin 2 (IL-2) were ineffective in augmenting NK cell-mediated cytotoxic reactions after cells had been irradiated with uvB. Furthermore, incubation of NK cells with IFN-alpha prior to irradiation failed to protect against the inhibitory effects. These studies provide evidence that in vitro exposure of NK cells to uvB radiation inhibits their function by a direct nonlethal effect and that this inhibition occurs selectively at the postbinding stage of target cell lysis.« less