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Title: Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets

Abstract

The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly the lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.

Authors:
; ; ; ;  [1]
  1. (Universita di Bologna (Italy))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6271530
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiation Research; (USA); Journal Volume: 124:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; LYMPHOCYTES; RADIOSENSITIVITY; MONOCYTES; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; GAMMA RADIATION; MAN; MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES; PHENOTYPE; RADIATION DOSES; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; ANTIBODIES; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BLOOD; BLOOD CELLS; BODY FLUIDS; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; DOSES; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; IONIZING RADIATIONS; LEUKOCYTES; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; PRIMATES; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; SOMATIC CELLS; VERTEBRATES; 560120* - Radiation Effects on Biochemicals, Cells, & Tissue Culture

Citation Formats

Rana, R., Vitale, M., Mazzotti, G., Manzoli, L., and Papa, S.. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.2307/3577701.
Rana, R., Vitale, M., Mazzotti, G., Manzoli, L., & Papa, S.. Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets. United States. doi:10.2307/3577701.
Rana, R., Vitale, M., Mazzotti, G., Manzoli, L., and Papa, S.. 1990. "Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets". United States. doi:10.2307/3577701.
@article{osti_6271530,
title = {Radiosensitivity of human natural killer cells: Binding and cytotoxic activities of natural killer cell subsets},
author = {Rana, R. and Vitale, M. and Mazzotti, G. and Manzoli, L. and Papa, S.},
abstractNote = {The sensitivity of human natural killer (NK) cell activities (both binding and killing) after exposure of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to different doses of gamma radiation was studied. A panel of monoclonal antibodies was used to identify the NK and T-lymphocyte subsets and to evaluate their radiosensitivity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were irradiated with low (2-6 Gy) and high (10-30 Gy) doses and NK cell binding and cytotoxic activity against K562 target cells were studied after 3 h and 48 h in culture. The primary damage to NK cell activity was identified at the postbinding level and affected mainly the lytic machinery. After 48 h culture postirradiation, an overall depression of cytotoxic activity was observed, but ionizing radiation produced either a selection of the more cytotoxic NK cell subsets, which therefore might be considered more resistant to radiation damage than the less cytotoxic NK cells, or a long-term stimulation of cytotoxic activity in surviving cells.},
doi = {10.2307/3577701},
journal = {Radiation Research; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 124:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month =
}
  • A subset of human T cells has recently been described. These cells express the CD3 complex but they do not carry the classical T-cell receptor (TCR)-..gamma../-..beta.. heterodimer on their surface (WT31/sup -/ CD3/sup +/). Instead, they express a TCR-..gamma.. chain associated with another type of polypeptide termed TCR-delta. The authors report here that a T-cell clone with natural killer (NK)-like activity, WM-14, had a disulfide bridged TCR-..gamma.. homodimer associated with CD3 on its surface. The TCR-..gamma.. chains of WM-14 cells were present in three different glycosylation forms of 43, 40, and 38 kDa, but they appeared to contain the samemore » polypeptide backbone. Since cytotoxicity by WM-14 could be inhibited by anti-CD3 antibodies, they concluded that the TCR-..gamma..-CD3 complex was involved in the NK-like unrestricted killer activity. Although normal CD3-..gamma.., CD3-delta, and CD3-element of chains were present in this clone, the association with the TCR-..gamma.. homodimer may be the cause of a complete processing of the N-linked oligosaccharides attached to the CD3-delta chain.« less
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