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Title: Inhaled histamine increases human lung mucociliary transport

Abstract

Histamine, a mediator of airways constriction, alters ciliary beat frequency, bronchial mucus production, and epithelial ion transport; and in dogs, increases mucociliary transport. To evaluate the effect of inhaled histamine on human tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance, the authors measured lung mucociliary clearance (LMC) and tracheal mucociliary transport rate (TMTR) in 5 healthy, nonsmoking subjects in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study. The concentration of inhaled histamine which produced a 20% fall in FEV/sub 1/ was established for each subject. On a separate day the subjects inhaled a 9 ..mu..m MMAD /sup 99m/Tc-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol. LMC and TMTR were then measured for 2.5h using a gamma camera and a tracheal multidetector probe. Simultaneously, the subjects were challenged every 26 +/- 4 min with either PBS or histamine in PBS. The Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ retained after 24h for histamine (14.4 +/- 7.6%) and PBS studies (13.1 +/- 8.6%) indicated no difference in deposition of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (ANOVA). Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ clearance at 30 min was increased in the histamine studies (61 +/- 21% compared to the PBS studies (44 +/- 29%; p < 0.02, ANOVA)). TMTR was also increased with histamine (7.6 +/- 3.4 mm/min) compared to PBS (4.6 +/- 1.7 mm/min;more » p < 0.001, ANOVA). Results indicate an acute stimulatory effect of inhaled histamine on mucous transport in humans.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Illinois, Chicago
OSTI Identifier:
5492656
Report Number(s):
CONF-8604222-
Journal ID: CODEN: FEPRA; TRN: 86-026840
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Fed. Proc., Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 45:3; Conference: 70. annual meeting of the Federation of American Society for Experimental Biology, St. Louis, MO, USA, 13 Apr 1986
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; HISTAMINE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; LUNG CLEARANCE; IRON OXIDES; INHALATION; ISOMERIC NUCLEI; LUNGS; MAN; TECHNETIUM 99; TRACER TECHNIQUES; TRACHEA; AMINES; ANIMALS; AZOLES; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BODY; CHALCOGENIDES; CLEARANCE; EXCRETION; HETEROCYCLIC COMPOUNDS; HOURS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; IMIDAZOLES; INTAKE; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; IRON COMPOUNDS; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; ISOTOPES; MAMMALS; NUCLEI; ODD-EVEN NUCLEI; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PRIMATES; RADIOISOTOPES; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; TECHNETIUM ISOTOPES; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; VERTEBRATES; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 560306* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987); 551001 - Physiological Systems- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Mussatto, D.J., Garrard, C.S., Trumbull, J.J., Bowers, M.W., Sanders, C.J., Yeates, D.B., and Lourenco, R.V.. Inhaled histamine increases human lung mucociliary transport. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Mussatto, D.J., Garrard, C.S., Trumbull, J.J., Bowers, M.W., Sanders, C.J., Yeates, D.B., & Lourenco, R.V.. Inhaled histamine increases human lung mucociliary transport. United States.
Mussatto, D.J., Garrard, C.S., Trumbull, J.J., Bowers, M.W., Sanders, C.J., Yeates, D.B., and Lourenco, R.V.. 1986. "Inhaled histamine increases human lung mucociliary transport". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_5492656,
title = {Inhaled histamine increases human lung mucociliary transport},
author = {Mussatto, D.J. and Garrard, C.S. and Trumbull, J.J. and Bowers, M.W. and Sanders, C.J. and Yeates, D.B. and Lourenco, R.V.},
abstractNote = {Histamine, a mediator of airways constriction, alters ciliary beat frequency, bronchial mucus production, and epithelial ion transport; and in dogs, increases mucociliary transport. To evaluate the effect of inhaled histamine on human tracheobronchial mucociliary clearance, the authors measured lung mucociliary clearance (LMC) and tracheal mucociliary transport rate (TMTR) in 5 healthy, nonsmoking subjects in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study. The concentration of inhaled histamine which produced a 20% fall in FEV/sub 1/ was established for each subject. On a separate day the subjects inhaled a 9 ..mu..m MMAD /sup 99m/Tc-Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ aerosol. LMC and TMTR were then measured for 2.5h using a gamma camera and a tracheal multidetector probe. Simultaneously, the subjects were challenged every 26 +/- 4 min with either PBS or histamine in PBS. The Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ retained after 24h for histamine (14.4 +/- 7.6%) and PBS studies (13.1 +/- 8.6%) indicated no difference in deposition of Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (ANOVA). Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/ clearance at 30 min was increased in the histamine studies (61 +/- 21% compared to the PBS studies (44 +/- 29%; p < 0.02, ANOVA)). TMTR was also increased with histamine (7.6 +/- 3.4 mm/min) compared to PBS (4.6 +/- 1.7 mm/min; p < 0.001, ANOVA). Results indicate an acute stimulatory effect of inhaled histamine on mucous transport in humans.},
doi = {},
journal = {Fed. Proc., Fed. Am. Soc. Exp. Biol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 45:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month = 3
}

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  • It has been suggested that blood flow have little effect on the lung clearance of Tc-99m DTPA which depends on the alveolar distension. However an increase of pulmonary blood flow, induces a recruitment of new vascular areas which can enhance this clearance. To assess this hypothesis the pulmonary apical and basal clearances of a sumicronic aerosol of Tc-99m DTPA were studied at rest and at exercise in seven non smoking volunteers in upright posture. As a matter of fact exercising upright is known to increase primarily the apical blood flow. After inhalation the subjects were seated on a bicycle theirmore » back against a gamma camera which was linked to a computer. The lung radioactivity was registered successively during a resting and an exercising period. At rest there was a gradient of clearance from the apex to the base of the lung, the apical clearance being significantly higher. At exercise (50 Watts, 60 c. min /sup -1/, 7 min.) this regional gradient was enhanced by a large and significant increase of the apical clearances (0.0340 min /sup -1/ +-0.0063 SD versus 0.00183 min /sup -1/ +- 0.074 SD at rest, n = 7, p < 0.01). By contrast the changes of the basal clearances were slight and unsignificant (0.0146 min /sup -1/ +- 0.0062 SD versus 0.0140 min /sup -1/ +- 0.0082 SD). Since exercise induces little distension of the apical alveoli but drastically enhances the apical blood flow, the observed increase of the apical lung clearance could be primarily attributed to the recruitment of new capillaries induced by exercise in the apices. This led to an increase of the surface area permeability product.« less
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