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Title: Species differences in impairment and recovery of alveolar macrophage functions following single and repeated ozone exposures

Abstract

Effects of single (0.4 ppm for 3, 6, or 12 hr) and repeated (0.4 ppm, 12 hr/day for 3 or 7 days) in vivo ozone exposures on rat and mouse alveolar macrophage functions and cell number were investigated. Single ozone exposure of rats resulted in a small (approximately 15%) decrease in Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and phorbol ester-induced superoxide production by the alveolar macrophages and was followed by recovery above control levels within 12 hr of exposure. Repeated exposures of rats for up to 7 days did not alter alveolar macrophage functions, with the exception of the effects of 3 days of exposure on superoxide production (71 {plus minus} 9% as compared with the controls). In mice, significant changes in alveolar macrophage functions were not observed until 12 hr of exposure (at that timepoint phagocytosis was 74 {plus minus} 2%). Repeated ozone exposures of mice did not cause a further decrease in phagocytosis (at Day 7, 74 {plus minus} 14%). Both after 3 and 7 days of repeated ozone exposure of mice, superoxide production by the alveolar macrophages was inhibited approximately 50%. In rats and mice, repeated ozone exposures led to an increase in the number of alveolar macrophages. In mice, thismore » increase appeared at a later time point (at Day 7 vs Day 3) and was less pronounced (at Day 7, 139 {plus minus} 9% vs 179 {plus minus} 17%) as compared with rats. In summary, our data show that rat and mouse alveolar macrophages have different susceptibilities to both single and repeated in vivo ozone exposures.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. (Laboratory for Toxicology, National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection, Bilthoven, (Netherlands))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
5226774
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; (United States); Journal Volume: 110:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; MACROPHAGES; BIOLOGICAL RECOVERY; OZONE; TOXICITY; ACUTE EXPOSURE; CHRONIC EXPOSURE; GENETIC VARIABILITY; INHALATION; LAVAGE; MICE; NEUTROPHILS; PHAGOCYTOSIS; RATS; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL MATERIALS; BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY; BLOOD; BLOOD CELLS; BODY FLUIDS; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; INTAKE; LEUKOCYTES; MAMMALS; MATERIALS; PHAGOCYTES; RECOVERY; RODENTS; SOMATIC CELLS; VERTEBRATES; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Oosting, R.S., van Golde, L.M., Verhoef, J., and Van Bree, L. Species differences in impairment and recovery of alveolar macrophage functions following single and repeated ozone exposures. United States: N. p., 1991. Web. doi:10.1016/0041-008X(91)90299-T.
Oosting, R.S., van Golde, L.M., Verhoef, J., & Van Bree, L. Species differences in impairment and recovery of alveolar macrophage functions following single and repeated ozone exposures. United States. doi:10.1016/0041-008X(91)90299-T.
Oosting, R.S., van Golde, L.M., Verhoef, J., and Van Bree, L. Thu . "Species differences in impairment and recovery of alveolar macrophage functions following single and repeated ozone exposures". United States. doi:10.1016/0041-008X(91)90299-T.
@article{osti_5226774,
title = {Species differences in impairment and recovery of alveolar macrophage functions following single and repeated ozone exposures},
author = {Oosting, R.S. and van Golde, L.M. and Verhoef, J. and Van Bree, L.},
abstractNote = {Effects of single (0.4 ppm for 3, 6, or 12 hr) and repeated (0.4 ppm, 12 hr/day for 3 or 7 days) in vivo ozone exposures on rat and mouse alveolar macrophage functions and cell number were investigated. Single ozone exposure of rats resulted in a small (approximately 15%) decrease in Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytosis and phorbol ester-induced superoxide production by the alveolar macrophages and was followed by recovery above control levels within 12 hr of exposure. Repeated exposures of rats for up to 7 days did not alter alveolar macrophage functions, with the exception of the effects of 3 days of exposure on superoxide production (71 {plus minus} 9% as compared with the controls). In mice, significant changes in alveolar macrophage functions were not observed until 12 hr of exposure (at that timepoint phagocytosis was 74 {plus minus} 2%). Repeated ozone exposures of mice did not cause a further decrease in phagocytosis (at Day 7, 74 {plus minus} 14%). Both after 3 and 7 days of repeated ozone exposure of mice, superoxide production by the alveolar macrophages was inhibited approximately 50%. In rats and mice, repeated ozone exposures led to an increase in the number of alveolar macrophages. In mice, this increase appeared at a later time point (at Day 7 vs Day 3) and was less pronounced (at Day 7, 139 {plus minus} 9% vs 179 {plus minus} 17%) as compared with rats. In summary, our data show that rat and mouse alveolar macrophages have different susceptibilities to both single and repeated in vivo ozone exposures.},
doi = {10.1016/0041-008X(91)90299-T},
journal = {Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 110:1,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1991},
month = {Thu Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1991}
}
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