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Title: The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications

Abstract

Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction`s production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in `nested`-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output {supmore » 3}He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.« less

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. Univ. of New Mexico Medical School, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Otolaryngology
  3. Accsys Technology Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States)
  4. North Star Research Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  5. Univ. of Texas Southwest Medical Center, Dallas, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
46659
Report Number(s):
SAND-95-0672C; CONF-950220-5
ON: DE95009859; TRN: 95:011004
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Conference: 9. international conference on ion beam modification of materials, Canberra (Australia), 5-10 Feb 1995; Other Information: PBD: [1995]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; NEOPLASMS; RADIOTHERAPY; PROTON REACTIONS; RADIATION DOSES; CALCULATION METHODS; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; LOW DOSE IRRADIATION; EXPERIMENTAL DATA

Citation Formats

Horn, K M, Doyle, B, Segal, M N, Hamm, R W, Adler, R J, and Glatstein, E. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications. United States: N. p., 1995. Web. doi:10.2172/46659.
Horn, K M, Doyle, B, Segal, M N, Hamm, R W, Adler, R J, & Glatstein, E. The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications. United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/46659
Horn, K M, Doyle, B, Segal, M N, Hamm, R W, Adler, R J, and Glatstein, E. 1995. "The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications". United States. https://doi.org/10.2172/46659. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/46659.
@article{osti_46659,
title = {The use of low energy, ion induced nuclear reactions for proton radiotherapy applications},
author = {Horn, K M and Doyle, B and Segal, M N and Hamm, R W and Adler, R J and Glatstein, E},
abstractNote = {Medical radiotherapy has traditionally relied upon the use of external photon beams and internally implanted radioisotopes as the chief means of irradiating tumors. However, advances in accelerator technology and the exploitation of novel means of producing radiation may provide useful alternatives to some current modes of medical radiation delivery with reduced total dose to surrounding healthy tissue, reduced expense, or increased treatment accessibility. This paper will briefly overview currently established modes of radiation therapy, techniques still considered experimental but in clinical use, innovative concepts under study that may enable new forms of treatment or enhance existing ones. The potential role of low energy, ion-induced nuclear reactions in radiotherapy applications is examined specifically for the 650 keV d({sup 3}He,p){sup 4}He nuclear reaction. This examination will describe the basic physics associated with this reaction`s production of 17.4 MeV protons and the processes used to fabricate the necessary materials used in the technique. Calculations of the delivered radiation dose, heat generation, and required exposure times are presented. Experimental data are also presented validating the dose calculations. The design of small, lower cost ion accelerators, as embodied in `nested`-tandem and radio frequency quadrupole accelerators is examined, as is the potential use of high-output {sup 3}He and deuterium ion sources. Finally, potential clinical applications are discussed in terms of the advantages and disadvantages of this technique with respect to current radiotherapy methods and equipment.},
doi = {10.2172/46659},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/46659}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1995},
month = {4}
}