skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Reclaiming the spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} materials

Abstract

Highlights: • The spent Zn–Mn batteries collected from manufacturers is the target waste. • A facile reclaiming process is presented. • The zinc is reclaimed to valuable electrolytic zinc by electrodepositing method. • The manganese elements are to produce valuable LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} battery material. • The reclamation process features environmental friendliness and saving resource. - Abstract: A process for reclaiming the materials in spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide (Zn–Mn) batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} materials is presented. After dismantling battery cans, the iron cans, covers, electric rods, organic separator, label, sealing materials, and electrolyte are separated through the washing, magnetic separation, filtrating, and sieving operations. Then, the powder residues react with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (2 mol L{sup −1}) solution to dissolve zinc under a liquid/solid ratio of 3:1 at room temperature, and subsequently, the electrolytic Zn with purity of ⩾99.8% is recovered in an electrolytic cell with a cathode efficiency of ⩾85% under the conditions of 37–40 °C and 300 A m{sup −2}. The most of MnO{sub 2} and a small quantity of electrolytic MnO{sub 2} are recovered from the filtration residue and the electrodeposit on the anodemore » of electrolytic cell, respectively. The recovered manganese oxides are used to synthesize LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} material of lithium-ion battery. The as-synthesized LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} discharges 118.3 mAh g{sup −1} capacity and 4.7 V voltage plateau, which is comparable to the sample synthesized using commercial electrolytic MnO{sub 2}. This process can recover the substances in the spent Zn–Mn batteries and innocuously treat the wastewaters, indicating that it is environmentally acceptable and applicable.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22436803
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Waste Management; Journal Volume: 34; Journal Issue: 10; Conference: CRETE 2012: 3. international conference on industrial and hazardous waste management, Chania (Greece), 12-14 Sep 2012; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; ANODES; CATHODES; ELECTRIC POTENTIAL; ELECTROLYTES; ELECTROLYTIC CELLS; LITHIUM ION BATTERIES; MANGANESE; MANGANESE OXIDES; MATERIALS RECOVERY; RESIDUES; SEALING MATERIALS; SULFURIC ACID; TEMPERATURE RANGE 0273-0400 K; WASHING; WASTE WATER; ZINC

Citation Formats

Ma, Ya, Cui, Yan, Zuo, Xiaoxi, Huang, Shanna, Hu, Keshui, Xiao, Xin, and Nan, Junmin, E-mail: jmnan@scnu.edu.cn. Reclaiming the spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} materials. United States: N. p., 2014. Web. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2014.05.009.
Ma, Ya, Cui, Yan, Zuo, Xiaoxi, Huang, Shanna, Hu, Keshui, Xiao, Xin, & Nan, Junmin, E-mail: jmnan@scnu.edu.cn. Reclaiming the spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} materials. United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2014.05.009.
Ma, Ya, Cui, Yan, Zuo, Xiaoxi, Huang, Shanna, Hu, Keshui, Xiao, Xin, and Nan, Junmin, E-mail: jmnan@scnu.edu.cn. 2014. "Reclaiming the spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} materials". United States. doi:10.1016/J.WASMAN.2014.05.009.
@article{osti_22436803,
title = {Reclaiming the spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} materials},
author = {Ma, Ya and Cui, Yan and Zuo, Xiaoxi and Huang, Shanna and Hu, Keshui and Xiao, Xin and Nan, Junmin, E-mail: jmnan@scnu.edu.cn},
abstractNote = {Highlights: • The spent Zn–Mn batteries collected from manufacturers is the target waste. • A facile reclaiming process is presented. • The zinc is reclaimed to valuable electrolytic zinc by electrodepositing method. • The manganese elements are to produce valuable LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} battery material. • The reclamation process features environmental friendliness and saving resource. - Abstract: A process for reclaiming the materials in spent alkaline zinc manganese dioxide (Zn–Mn) batteries collected from the manufacturers to prepare valuable electrolytic zinc and LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} materials is presented. After dismantling battery cans, the iron cans, covers, electric rods, organic separator, label, sealing materials, and electrolyte are separated through the washing, magnetic separation, filtrating, and sieving operations. Then, the powder residues react with H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (2 mol L{sup −1}) solution to dissolve zinc under a liquid/solid ratio of 3:1 at room temperature, and subsequently, the electrolytic Zn with purity of ⩾99.8% is recovered in an electrolytic cell with a cathode efficiency of ⩾85% under the conditions of 37–40 °C and 300 A m{sup −2}. The most of MnO{sub 2} and a small quantity of electrolytic MnO{sub 2} are recovered from the filtration residue and the electrodeposit on the anode of electrolytic cell, respectively. The recovered manganese oxides are used to synthesize LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} material of lithium-ion battery. The as-synthesized LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} discharges 118.3 mAh g{sup −1} capacity and 4.7 V voltage plateau, which is comparable to the sample synthesized using commercial electrolytic MnO{sub 2}. This process can recover the substances in the spent Zn–Mn batteries and innocuously treat the wastewaters, indicating that it is environmentally acceptable and applicable.},
doi = {10.1016/J.WASMAN.2014.05.009},
journal = {Waste Management},
number = 10,
volume = 34,
place = {United States},
year = 2014,
month =
}
  • Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We separated Zn from Mn in zinc-carbon and alkaline batteries after removal of Hg. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Almost total removal of Hg is achieved at low temperature in air. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitrogen atmosphere is needed to reduce zinc and to permit its volatilization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A high grade Zn concentrate was obtained with a high recovery at 1000-1200 Degree-Sign C. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The grade of Mn in the residue was enhanced with complete recovery. - Abstract: The aim of this paper is the recovery of manganese and zinc from a mixture of zinc-carbon and alkaline spent batteries, containing 40.9% of Mn and 30.1%more » of Zn, after preliminary physical treatment followed by removal of mercury. Separation of the metals has been carried out on the basis of their different boiling points, being 357 Degree-Sign C and 906 Degree-Sign C the boiling point of mercury and zinc and 1564 Degree-Sign C the melting point of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Characterization by chemical analysis, TGA/DTA and X-ray powder diffraction of the mixture has been carried out after comminution sieving and shaking table treatment to remove the anodic collectors and most of chlorides contained in the mixture. The mixture has been roasted at various temperatures and resident times in a flow of air to set the best conditions to remove mercury that were 400 Degree-Sign C and 10 min. After that, the flow of air has been turned into a nitrogen one (inert atmosphere) and the temperatures raised, thus permitting the zinc oxide to be reduced to metallic zinc by the carbon present in the original mixture and recovered after volatilization as a high grade concentrate, while manganese was left in the residue. The recovery and the grade of the two metals, at 1000 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, were 84% and 100% for zinc and 85% and 63% for manganese, respectively. The recovery of zinc increased to 99% with a grade of 97% at 1200 Degree-Sign C and 30 min residence time, while the recovery and grade of manganese were 86% and 87%, respectively, at that temperature. Moreover, the chlorinated compounds that could form by the combustion of the plastics contained in the spent batteries, are destroyed at the temperature required by the process.« less
  • Highlights: • Manganese oxides were synthesized using spent batteries as raw materials. • Spent alkaline and zinc–carbon size AA batteries were used. • A biohydrometallurgical process was employed to bio-lixiviate batteries. • Manganese oxides were active in the oxidation of VOCs (ethanol and heptane). - Abstract: Manganese, in the form of oxide, was recovered from spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries employing a biohydrometallurgy process, using a pilot plant consisting in: an air-lift bioreactor (containing an acid-reducing medium produced by an Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans bacteria immobilized on elemental sulfur); a leaching reactor (were battery powder is mixed with the acid-reducing medium) andmore » a recovery reactor. Two different manganese oxides were recovered from the leachate liquor: one of them by electrolysis (EMO) and the other by a chemical precipitation with KMnO{sub 4} solution (CMO). The non-leached solid residue was also studied (RMO). The solids were compared with a MnO{sub x} synthesized in our laboratory. The characterization by XRD, FTIR and XPS reveal the presence of Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the EMO and the CMO samples, together with some Mn{sup 4+} cations. In the solid not extracted by acidic leaching (RMO) the main phase detected was Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}. The catalytic performance of the oxides was studied in the complete oxidation of ethanol and heptane. Complete conversion of ethanol occurs at 200 °C, while heptane requires more than 400 °C. The CMO has the highest oxide selectivity to CO{sub 2}. The results show that manganese oxides obtained using spent alkaline and zinc–carbon batteries as raw materials, have an interesting performance as catalysts for elimination of VOCs.« less
  • A hydrometallurgical method involving natural organic acid leaching has been developed for recovery of lithium and cobalt from the cathode active materials in spent lithium-ion batteries. Succinic acid is employed as leaching agent and H2O2 as reductant. The cobalt and lithium contents from the succinic acid-based treatment of spent batteries are determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy to calculate the leaching efficiency. The spent LiCoO2 samples after calcination and the residues after leaching are characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results show that nearly 100% of cobalt and more than 96% of lithium are leached undermore » optimal conditions: succinic acid concentration of 1.5 mol L-1, H2O2 content of 4 vol.%, solid-to-liquid ratio of 15 g L-1, temperature of 70 °C, and reaction time of 40 min. Results are also given for fitting of the experimental data to acid leaching kinetic models.« less
  • Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Vacuum pyrolysis as a pretreatment was used to separate cathode material from aluminum foils. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt and lithium can be leached using oxalate while cobalt can be directly precipitated as cobalt oxalate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cobalt and lithium can be separated efficiently from each other only in the oxalate leaching process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High reaction efficiency of LiCoO{sub 2} was obtained with oxalate. - Abstract: Spent lithium-ion batteries containing lots of strategic resources such as cobalt and lithium are considered as an attractive secondary resource. In this work, an environmentally compatible process based on vacuum pyrolysis, oxalatemore » leaching and precipitation is applied to recover cobalt and lithium from spent lithium-ion batteries. Oxalate is introduced as leaching reagent meanwhile as precipitant which leaches and precipitates cobalt from LiCoO{sub 2} and CoO directly as CoC{sub 2}O{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O with 1.0 M oxalate solution at 80 Degree-Sign C and solid/liquid ratio of 50 g L{sup -1} for 120 min. The reaction efficiency of more than 98% of LiCoO{sub 2} can be achieved and cobalt and lithium can also be separated efficiently during the hydrometallurgical process. The combined process is simple and adequate for the recovery of valuable metals from spent lithium-ion batteries.« less
  • This paper reports on the electrochemical insertion and deinsertion of H{sup +} that was investigated by studying its influence on the evolution of the crystallographic structure of {gamma}-MnO{sub 2} of EMD type (electrochemical method deposition) during the discharge and recharge processes of an alkaline battery, using in situ x-ray diffraction. During the first discharge, proton insertion up to X = 0.4 H{sup +} per MnO{sub 2} with concomitant electron transfer causes an expansion of the MnO{sub 2} crystalline cell. The lattice expansion is attributed to the reduction of Mn{sup 4+} ions to Mn{sup 3+} ions which have a larger ionicmore » radius. Between 0.5 to 0.8 H{sup +} inserted the long-range order is lost and the presence of a quasi-amorphous phase which could not be identified is detected. This amorphous phase is reduced to {gamma}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} (or MnO{sub 3}O{sub 4}) and to Mn(OH){sub 2} when more than 0.8 H{sup +} is inserted. On recharge, the Mn(OH){sub 2} is oxidized to {gamma}-Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3} (or Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}) leading to poor cycling of the battery. When the discharge is limited to 0.8 H{sup +} the battery can be recharged and cycled many times. Still more cycles can be obtained when the discharge is limited to o.5 H{sup +}, corresponding to the range where the {gamma}-MnO{sub 2} structure is retained. In this range, strong hysteresis in the voltage curves indicated that while there is structural reversibility. structural changes arise at different voltages on discharge and recharge.« less