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Title: NiCr etching in a reactive gas

Abstract

The authors have etched NiCr through a resist mask using Cl/Ar based chemistry in an electron cyclotron resonance etch system. The optimum gas mixture and etch parameters were found for various ratios of Ni to Cr, based on the etch rate, redeposits, and the etch ratio to the mask. The introduction of O{sub 2} into the chamber, which is often used in the etching of Cr, served to both increase and decrease the etch rate depending explicitly on the etching parameters. Etch rates of >50 nm min{sup -1} and ratios of >1 (NiCr:Mask) were achieved for NiCr (80:20). Pattern transfer from the mask into the NiCr was achieved with a high fidelity and without redeposits for a Cl/Ar mix of 10% Ar (90% Cl{sub 2}) at an etch rate of {approx_equal}50 nm min{sup -1} and a ratio of 0.42 (NiCr:ZEP 7000 e-beam mask)

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Institute of Physical High Technology, 9 Albert Einstein Strasse 07745 Jena (Germany)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
20979366
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, International Journal Devoted to Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films; Journal Volume: 25; Journal Issue: 3; Other Information: DOI: 10.1116/1.2716668; (c) 2007 American Vacuum Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; ARGON; CHLORINE; CHROMIUM ALLOYS; ELECTRON BEAMS; ELECTRON CYCLOTRON-RESONANCE; ETCHING; MIXTURES; NICKEL ALLOYS; RESPIRATORS

Citation Formats

Ritter, J., Boucher, R., Morgenroth, W., and Meyer, H. G. NiCr etching in a reactive gas. United States: N. p., 2007. Web. doi:10.1116/1.2716668.
Ritter, J., Boucher, R., Morgenroth, W., & Meyer, H. G. NiCr etching in a reactive gas. United States. doi:10.1116/1.2716668.
Ritter, J., Boucher, R., Morgenroth, W., and Meyer, H. G. Tue . "NiCr etching in a reactive gas". United States. doi:10.1116/1.2716668.
@article{osti_20979366,
title = {NiCr etching in a reactive gas},
author = {Ritter, J. and Boucher, R. and Morgenroth, W. and Meyer, H. G.},
abstractNote = {The authors have etched NiCr through a resist mask using Cl/Ar based chemistry in an electron cyclotron resonance etch system. The optimum gas mixture and etch parameters were found for various ratios of Ni to Cr, based on the etch rate, redeposits, and the etch ratio to the mask. The introduction of O{sub 2} into the chamber, which is often used in the etching of Cr, served to both increase and decrease the etch rate depending explicitly on the etching parameters. Etch rates of >50 nm min{sup -1} and ratios of >1 (NiCr:Mask) were achieved for NiCr (80:20). Pattern transfer from the mask into the NiCr was achieved with a high fidelity and without redeposits for a Cl/Ar mix of 10% Ar (90% Cl{sub 2}) at an etch rate of {approx_equal}50 nm min{sup -1} and a ratio of 0.42 (NiCr:ZEP 7000 e-beam mask)},
doi = {10.1116/1.2716668},
journal = {Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology. A, International Journal Devoted to Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films},
number = 3,
volume = 25,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Tue May 15 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}
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