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Title: Deep Tunnel's twists and turns -- CSO control in metro Chicago

Abstract

Metro-Chicago began its search for a comprehensive solution to its severe and then-worsening combined sewer overflow (CSO) pollution and flooding problems even before enactment of the 1972 Federal Clean Water Act. Many studies and extensive interagency cooperation singled out the Tunnel and Reservoir Plan (TARP) as the best means of cost-effectively achieving three anti-pollution and anti-flooding objectives: protect Chicagoland's main drinking water supply--Lake Michigan--from raw sewage backflows; clean up polluted streams; and alleviated basement sewage backups. Owing to TARP's uniqueness, initially there was little or no design, construction or operations experience to draw upon to help implement the project. But since TARP's four systems operate independently, and new tunnel segments are placed into operation as soon as completed, the District has been able to continuously monitor performance and obtain operations feedback. This has enabled ongoing refinement of design, construction, and operational strategy on successive TARP tunnel contracts. Herein is a brief discussion of TARP's development--an evolutionary process with many twists and turns--and of problems and opportunities encountered which resulted in design or operations changes.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago, IL (US)
OSTI Identifier:
20014867
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1998 National Conference on Environmental Engineering, Chicago, IL (US), 06/07/1998--06/10/1998; Other Information: PBD: 1998; Related Information: In: Water resources and the urban environment--98, by Wilson, T.E. [ed.], 754 pages.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; SEWAGE; FLOODS; DRINKING WATER; TUNNELS; WATER POLLUTION; CHICAGO; STORAGE

Citation Formats

Farnan, J.C., Lue-Hing, C., O'Connor, T.K., and Rakoczy, J.R. Deep Tunnel's twists and turns -- CSO control in metro Chicago. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Farnan, J.C., Lue-Hing, C., O'Connor, T.K., & Rakoczy, J.R. Deep Tunnel's twists and turns -- CSO control in metro Chicago. United States.
Farnan, J.C., Lue-Hing, C., O'Connor, T.K., and Rakoczy, J.R. Wed . "Deep Tunnel's twists and turns -- CSO control in metro Chicago". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_20014867,
title = {Deep Tunnel's twists and turns -- CSO control in metro Chicago},
author = {Farnan, J.C. and Lue-Hing, C. and O'Connor, T.K. and Rakoczy, J.R.},
abstractNote = {Metro-Chicago began its search for a comprehensive solution to its severe and then-worsening combined sewer overflow (CSO) pollution and flooding problems even before enactment of the 1972 Federal Clean Water Act. Many studies and extensive interagency cooperation singled out the Tunnel and Reservoir Plan (TARP) as the best means of cost-effectively achieving three anti-pollution and anti-flooding objectives: protect Chicagoland's main drinking water supply--Lake Michigan--from raw sewage backflows; clean up polluted streams; and alleviated basement sewage backups. Owing to TARP's uniqueness, initially there was little or no design, construction or operations experience to draw upon to help implement the project. But since TARP's four systems operate independently, and new tunnel segments are placed into operation as soon as completed, the District has been able to continuously monitor performance and obtain operations feedback. This has enabled ongoing refinement of design, construction, and operational strategy on successive TARP tunnel contracts. Herein is a brief discussion of TARP's development--an evolutionary process with many twists and turns--and of problems and opportunities encountered which resulted in design or operations changes.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1998},
month = {Wed Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1998}
}

Conference:
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