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Title: Metallic atomically-thin layered silicon epitaxially grown on silicene/ZrB 2

Abstract

Using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), we observe a new two-dimensional (2D) silicon crystal that is formed by depositing additional Si atoms onto spontaneously-formed epitaxial silicene on a ZrB2 thin film. From scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) studies, we find that this atomically-thin layered silicon has distinctly different electronic properties. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) reveals that, in sharp contrast to epitaxial silicene, the layered silicon exhibits significantly enhanced density of states at the Fermi level resulting from newly formed metallic bands. The 2D growth of this material could allow for direct contacting to the silicene surface and demonstrates the dramatic changes in electronic structure that can occur by the addition of even a single monolayer amount of material in 2D systems.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1409566
Report Number(s):
BNL-114618-2017-JA¿¿¿
Journal ID: ISSN 2053-1583
DOE Contract Number:
SC0012704
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: 2D Materials; Journal Volume: 4; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Gill, Tobias G., Fleurence, Antoine, Warner, Ben, Prüser, Henning, Friedlein, Rainer, Sadowski, Jerzy T., Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F., and Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko. Metallic atomically-thin layered silicon epitaxially grown on silicene/ZrB 2. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/2053-1583/aa5a80.
Gill, Tobias G., Fleurence, Antoine, Warner, Ben, Prüser, Henning, Friedlein, Rainer, Sadowski, Jerzy T., Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F., & Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko. Metallic atomically-thin layered silicon epitaxially grown on silicene/ZrB 2. United States. doi:10.1088/2053-1583/aa5a80.
Gill, Tobias G., Fleurence, Antoine, Warner, Ben, Prüser, Henning, Friedlein, Rainer, Sadowski, Jerzy T., Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F., and Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko. Fri . "Metallic atomically-thin layered silicon epitaxially grown on silicene/ZrB 2". United States. doi:10.1088/2053-1583/aa5a80.
@article{osti_1409566,
title = {Metallic atomically-thin layered silicon epitaxially grown on silicene/ZrB 2},
author = {Gill, Tobias G. and Fleurence, Antoine and Warner, Ben and Prüser, Henning and Friedlein, Rainer and Sadowski, Jerzy T. and Hirjibehedin, Cyrus F. and Yamada-Takamura, Yukiko},
abstractNote = {Using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM), we observe a new two-dimensional (2D) silicon crystal that is formed by depositing additional Si atoms onto spontaneously-formed epitaxial silicene on a ZrB2 thin film. From scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) studies, we find that this atomically-thin layered silicon has distinctly different electronic properties. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) reveals that, in sharp contrast to epitaxial silicene, the layered silicon exhibits significantly enhanced density of states at the Fermi level resulting from newly formed metallic bands. The 2D growth of this material could allow for direct contacting to the silicene surface and demonstrates the dramatic changes in electronic structure that can occur by the addition of even a single monolayer amount of material in 2D systems.},
doi = {10.1088/2053-1583/aa5a80},
journal = {2D Materials},
number = 2,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 17 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Feb 17 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • We observe a new two-dimensional (2D) silicon crystal, using low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and it's formed by depositing additional Si atoms onto spontaneously-formed epitaxial silicene on a ZrB 2 thin film. From scanning tunnelling spectroscopy (STS) studies, we find that this atomically-thin layered silicon has distinctly different electronic properties. Angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) reveals that, in sharp contrast to epitaxial silicene, the layered silicon exhibits significantly enhanced density of states at the Fermi level resulting from newly formed metallic bands. Furthermore, the 2D growth of this material could allow for direct contacting tomore » the silicene surface and demonstrates the dramatic changes in electronic structure that can occur by the addition of even a single monolayer amount of material in 2D systems.« less
  • We report the growth of untwinned epitaxial thin films of Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O by atomically layered heteroepitaxy on SrTiO{sub 3} substrates. These films are {ital c}-axis oriented as-layered and do not exhibit 90{degree} in-plane defects, i.e., {ital a}-{ital b} twinning.'' By misorienting the surface normal from {l brace}100{r brace} by approximately 4{degree} towards {l angle}111{r angle}, the cubic symmetry of the {l brace}100{r brace} surface is adequately broken to completely align the {ital b} axis of the superconducting film with respect to the substrate. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction patterns observed during growth and post-growth x-ray diffraction analysis indicate that the incommensurate structuralmore » modulation occurs along the same direction as the step edges.« less
  • Few-layer thick MoSe 2 and WSe 2 possess non-trivial spin textures with sizable spin splitting due to the inversion symmetry breaking embedded in the crystal structure and strong spin–orbit coupling. Here, we report a spin-resolved photoemission study of MoSe 2 and WSe 2 thin film samples epitaxially grown on a bilayer graphene substrate. Furthermore, we only found spin polarization in the single- and trilayer samples—not in the bilayer sample—mostly along the out-of-plane direction of the sample surface. The measured spin polarization is found to be strongly dependent on the light polarization as well as the measurement geometry, which reveals intricatemore » coupling between the spin and orbital degrees of freedom in this class of material.« less