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Title: An evaluation of drinking water samples treated with alternative disinfectants

Abstract

Due to concern over potential human health risks associated with the use of chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) for disinfection of drinking water, many utilities are considering alternative disinfectants. An evaluation is thus needed of the potential risks associated with the use of alternative disinfectants relative to those posed by Cl{sub 2}. At a pilot-scale drinking water plant in Jefferson Parish, LA., two studies were conducted in which clarified and sand filtered Mississippi River water was treated with either ozone (O{sub 3}), monochloramine (NH{sub 2}Cl), Cl{sub 2} or was not disinfected. Ozonated water was also post-disinfected with either NH{sub 2}Cl or Cl{sub 2}, to provide a disinfectant residual. For each treatment stream total organic carbon (TOC), total organic halide (TOX) and microbiological contaminants were determined. XAD resin concentrates were also prepared for mutagenicity testing in the Ames Salmonella assay. Water samples disinfected with O{sub 3} alone had low levels of mutagenic activity, the same as the non-disinfected water. The level of mutagenicity observed following chlorination was approximately twice that observed following treatment with NH{sub 2}Cl. Disinfection with O{sub 3} prior to treatment with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl resulted in a significantly lower level of mutagenicity than when either disinfectant wasmore » used alone. The concentrations of TOX present in the water samples showed a pattern similar to that of the mutagenicity data. The levels of TOC, by contrast, were similar for all the treatment streams. No significant baterial contamination was observed in water samples treated with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl alone or in combination with O{sub 3}, as determined by heterotrophic plate counts. However, O{sub 3} alone did not insure an acceptable level of disinfection at the end of the treatment stream.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1]
  1. Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH (United States) [and others
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
111539
Report Number(s):
CONF-9504110-
TRN: 95:005009-0082
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 21. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) annual Risk Reduction Engineering Laboratory research symposium, Cincinnati, OH (United States), 4-6 Apr 1995; Other Information: PBD: 1995; Related Information: Is Part Of 21st Annual RREL research symposium: Abstract proceedings; PB: 398 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 40 CHEMISTRY; DRINKING WATER; WATER QUALITY; WATER TREATMENT; SURFACE WATERS; MICROORGANISMS; REMOVAL; CHLORINATION; DISINFECTANTS; OZONE; WATER TREATMENT PLANTS; OXIDATION; MISSISSIPPI RIVER

Citation Formats

Patterson, K.S., Lykins, B.W. Jr., and Garner, L.M.. An evaluation of drinking water samples treated with alternative disinfectants. United States: N. p., 1995. Web.
Patterson, K.S., Lykins, B.W. Jr., & Garner, L.M.. An evaluation of drinking water samples treated with alternative disinfectants. United States.
Patterson, K.S., Lykins, B.W. Jr., and Garner, L.M.. 1995. "An evaluation of drinking water samples treated with alternative disinfectants". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_111539,
title = {An evaluation of drinking water samples treated with alternative disinfectants},
author = {Patterson, K.S. and Lykins, B.W. Jr. and Garner, L.M.},
abstractNote = {Due to concern over potential human health risks associated with the use of chlorine (Cl{sub 2}) for disinfection of drinking water, many utilities are considering alternative disinfectants. An evaluation is thus needed of the potential risks associated with the use of alternative disinfectants relative to those posed by Cl{sub 2}. At a pilot-scale drinking water plant in Jefferson Parish, LA., two studies were conducted in which clarified and sand filtered Mississippi River water was treated with either ozone (O{sub 3}), monochloramine (NH{sub 2}Cl), Cl{sub 2} or was not disinfected. Ozonated water was also post-disinfected with either NH{sub 2}Cl or Cl{sub 2}, to provide a disinfectant residual. For each treatment stream total organic carbon (TOC), total organic halide (TOX) and microbiological contaminants were determined. XAD resin concentrates were also prepared for mutagenicity testing in the Ames Salmonella assay. Water samples disinfected with O{sub 3} alone had low levels of mutagenic activity, the same as the non-disinfected water. The level of mutagenicity observed following chlorination was approximately twice that observed following treatment with NH{sub 2}Cl. Disinfection with O{sub 3} prior to treatment with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl resulted in a significantly lower level of mutagenicity than when either disinfectant was used alone. The concentrations of TOX present in the water samples showed a pattern similar to that of the mutagenicity data. The levels of TOC, by contrast, were similar for all the treatment streams. No significant baterial contamination was observed in water samples treated with either Cl{sub 2} or NH{sub 2}Cl alone or in combination with O{sub 3}, as determined by heterotrophic plate counts. However, O{sub 3} alone did not insure an acceptable level of disinfection at the end of the treatment stream.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1995,
month =
}

Conference:
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  • Female SENCAR mice were treated with aqueous solutions of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), chlorine dioxide (ClO/sub 2/), and monochloramine (NH/sub 2/Cl) by whole body exposure (except head) for a 10-min period for 4 days in the first experiment and for 1 day (except NH/sub 2/Cl) in the second experiment. Animals were sacrificed the day following the last treatment (experiment 1) or on day 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 10, and 12 following treatment (experiment 2), and skin thickness was measured by light microscopy. Concentrations of disinfectants were 1, 10, 100, 300, and 1000 mg/L, for experiment 1more » and 1000 mg/L for experiment 2. Thickness of the interfollicular epidermis (IFE) for control animals was 15.4 +/- 1.5 ..mu..m. After 4 days of treatment at 1000 mg/L, HOCl and ClO/sub 2/ increased thickness to 30 +/- 7.0 and 40.2 +/- 11.8, and NaOCl increased thickness to 25.2 +/- 6.1 ..mu.. m. The response to HOCl was found to be dose-related. The time-course study following a single treatment of 1000 mg/L HOCl, showed a progression of IFE thickening of from 18.3 +/- 1.4 at 1 day to 30.8 +/- 8.0 at 8 days, decreasing to 19.1 +/- 6.2 ..mu..m at 12 days. ClO/sub 2/ and NaOCl when tested in this manner did not produce increased thickness of IFE with time, but rather gave a persistent level of increase that remained for the 12 days. NH/sub 2/Cl reduced skin thickness to 13.6 +/- 6.1 ..mu..m. Examination of sections of skin treated with HOCl and ClO/sub 2/ indicated an increase in cell numbers. HOCl and ClO/sub 2/ are therefore capable of inducting hyperplastic responses in the mouse skin. The basis for the decrease in skin thickness resulting from NH/sub 2/Cl treatment remains to be established.« less
  • This paper summarizes toxicological studies conducted with drinking water disinfectants. Toxicological effects, which are associated with the disinfectants themselves as well as with the by-products formed when disinfectants react with organic material present in water, are considered. The health impact of chemical reactions occurring between residual disinfectants and nutrients in the gastrointestinal tract is also discussed. 40 references, 5 tables.
  • Studies of the toxicity of the by-products of disinfectants have focused on the trihalomethanes (THMs), which are formed during chlorination and for which considerable data on carcinogenicity have been developed. The level of total THMs in finished drinking water, currently regulated at 100 micrograms/L, should be reduced. Noting that chloroform is the principal THM produced by chlorination, the subcommittee found this level to be unsupportable on the basis of the risk values for chloroform developed in this review. Other, non-volatile by-products of chlorination may be important in contributing mutagenic properties to drinking water, especially when the natural water being treatedmore » contains high levels of organic matter. Short-term animal skin tests, although not conclusive, provide indications that organic concentrates from chlorinated water are tumorigenic under some experimental conditions. Unfortunately, many by-products of chlorination and other disinfection practices have not been identified. Consequently, the risks of ingesting cannot be quantified at present, but are potentially high enough to warrant continued efforts to analyze them. The use of alternative methods of drinking water disinfection is increasing, largely due to health and regulatory concerns about trihalomethanes. Thus, the nature and toxicity of the by-products of some other widely used water treatments (chloramination, ozonation, and chlorine dioxide) are also evaluated in the report to the extent allowed by available data. The subcommittee calculated quantitative risk assessment for disinfectants or their by-products when there was sufficient data.« less
  • The EPA Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water is developing national primary drinking water regulations for disinfectant and disinfection by-product contaminants. Thirteen contaminants are being considered to be regulated under Phase 6. These contaminants, referred to as Phase 6a, are the subject of the report. The information is important for setting the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal for a contaminant. The exposure information also is used to estimate the baseline health impact assessment of current levels and for evaluation of the health benefits of the regulatory alternatives.
  • The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinkingmore » water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increase in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. The authors suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract.« less