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Title: Results of toxicological testing of Jefferson Paris pilot plant samples

Abstract

Five toxicological tests were performed using concentrated drinking water samples collected at a pilot-scale drinking water treatment plant that had streams treated with different disinfectants (no disinfectant, ozone, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, or chlorine) before treatment with granular activated carbon (GAC). The toxicological tests used in this study were the Ames Salmonella assay, a subchronic in vivo toxicity assay in mice, the SENCAR mouse skin initiation-promotion assay, a rat liver foci assay, and the lung adenoma assay in strain A mice. These tests were conducted to determine the general toxicity and the mutagenic/carcinogenic potential association with the use of disinfection and/or GAC in the treatment of drinking water. Results indicated that the samples remained mutagenic for the duration of the tests. All the drinking water concentrates (4000 x) prepared by the XAD resin adsorption procedure failed to provide statistically significant indication of carcinogenic activity in the SENCAR mouse, rat liver foci, and the lung adenoma assays. However, concentrates of the chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine treated waters gave consistent mutagenic responses in the Ames Salmonella assay. GAC was effective for 6 months in removing both the mutagenicity of chlorine-treated water and the potential of water to become mutagenic when treated withmore » chlorine. A consistent pattern of these differences indicating overt toxicity was not detected.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Cincinnati, OH
OSTI Identifier:
5554929
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environ. Health Perspect.; (United States); Journal Volume: 69
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; TOXICITY; DRINKING WATER; CARCINOGEN SCREENING; MUTAGEN SCREENING; WATER TREATMENT; OZONE; ACTIVATED CARBON; ADENOMAS; CARCINOGENESIS; CHLORAMINES; CHLORINATION; CHLORINE OXIDES; ION EXCHANGE CHROMATOGRAPHY; LIVER; LOUISIANA; LUNGS; MICE; MUTAGENESIS; PILOT PLANTS; RATS; SALMONELLA TYPHIMURIUM; SKIN; WATER TREATMENT PLANTS; ADSORBENTS; AMINES; ANIMALS; BACTERIA; BODY; CARBON; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHROMATOGRAPHY; DIGESTIVE SYSTEM; DISEASES; ELEMENTS; FEDERAL REGION VI; FUNCTIONAL MODELS; GLANDS; HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; HALOGENATION; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; MAMMALS; MICROORGANISMS; NEOPLASMS; NONMETALS; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PATHOGENESIS; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; RODENTS; SALMONELLA; SCREENING; SEPARATION PROCESSES; USA; VERTEBRATES; WATER; 560300* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Miller, R.G., Kopfler, F.C., Condie, L.W., Pereira, M.A., Meier, J.R., Ringhand, H.P., Robinson, M., and Casto, B.C.. Results of toxicological testing of Jefferson Paris pilot plant samples. United States: N. p., 1986. Web. doi:10.1289/ehp.8669129.
Miller, R.G., Kopfler, F.C., Condie, L.W., Pereira, M.A., Meier, J.R., Ringhand, H.P., Robinson, M., & Casto, B.C.. Results of toxicological testing of Jefferson Paris pilot plant samples. United States. doi:10.1289/ehp.8669129.
Miller, R.G., Kopfler, F.C., Condie, L.W., Pereira, M.A., Meier, J.R., Ringhand, H.P., Robinson, M., and Casto, B.C.. 1986. "Results of toxicological testing of Jefferson Paris pilot plant samples". United States. doi:10.1289/ehp.8669129.
@article{osti_5554929,
title = {Results of toxicological testing of Jefferson Paris pilot plant samples},
author = {Miller, R.G. and Kopfler, F.C. and Condie, L.W. and Pereira, M.A. and Meier, J.R. and Ringhand, H.P. and Robinson, M. and Casto, B.C.},
abstractNote = {Five toxicological tests were performed using concentrated drinking water samples collected at a pilot-scale drinking water treatment plant that had streams treated with different disinfectants (no disinfectant, ozone, chlorine dioxide, monochloramine, or chlorine) before treatment with granular activated carbon (GAC). The toxicological tests used in this study were the Ames Salmonella assay, a subchronic in vivo toxicity assay in mice, the SENCAR mouse skin initiation-promotion assay, a rat liver foci assay, and the lung adenoma assay in strain A mice. These tests were conducted to determine the general toxicity and the mutagenic/carcinogenic potential association with the use of disinfection and/or GAC in the treatment of drinking water. Results indicated that the samples remained mutagenic for the duration of the tests. All the drinking water concentrates (4000 x) prepared by the XAD resin adsorption procedure failed to provide statistically significant indication of carcinogenic activity in the SENCAR mouse, rat liver foci, and the lung adenoma assays. However, concentrates of the chlorine, chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine treated waters gave consistent mutagenic responses in the Ames Salmonella assay. GAC was effective for 6 months in removing both the mutagenicity of chlorine-treated water and the potential of water to become mutagenic when treated with chlorine. A consistent pattern of these differences indicating overt toxicity was not detected.},
doi = {10.1289/ehp.8669129},
journal = {Environ. Health Perspect.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 69,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month =
}
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