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Title: The role of nuclear energy in mitigating greenhouse warming

A behavioral, top-down, forced-equilibrium market model of long-term ({approximately} 2,100) global energy-economics interactions has been modified with a bottom-up nuclear energy model and used to construct consistent scenarios describing future impacts of civil nuclear materials flows in an expanding, multi-regional (13) world economy. The relative measures and tradeoffs between economic (GNP, tax impacts, productivity, etc.), environmental (greenhouse gas accumulations, waste accumulation, proliferation risk), and energy (resources, energy mixes, supply-side versus demand-side attributes) interactions that emerge from these analyses are focused herein on advancing understanding of the role that nuclear energy (and other non-carbon energy sources) might play in mitigating greenhouse warming. Two ostensibly opposing scenario drivers are investigated: (a) demand-side improvements in (non-price-induced) autonomous energy efficiency improvements; and (b) supply-side carbon-tax inducements to shift energy mixes towards reduced- or non-carbon forms. In terms of stemming greenhouse warming for minimal cost of greenhouse-gas abatement, and with the limitations of the simplified taxing schedule used, a symbiotic combination of these two approaches may offer advantages not found if each is applied separately.
Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
663344
Report Number(s):
LA-UR--97-4894; CONF-9710142--
ON: DE98004250; TRN: 99:000873
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International conference on environment and nuclear energy, Washington, DC (United States), 27-29 Oct 1997; Other Information: PBD: [1997]
Research Org:
Los Alamos National Lab., Technology and Safety Assessment Div., NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Management and Administration, Washington, DC (United States)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; NUCLEAR ENERGY; ENERGY MODELS; GREENHOUSE GASES; CLIMATIC CHANGE; ECONOMIC IMPACT; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; FUEL SUBSTITUTION; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS