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Title: Carbonation and CO{sub 2} uptake of concrete

This study developed a reliable procedure to assess the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) uptake of concrete by carbonation during the service life of a structure and by the recycling of concrete after demolition. To generalize the amount of absorbable CO{sub 2} per unit volume of concrete, the molar concentration of carbonatable constituents in hardened cement paste was simplified as a function of the unit content of cement, and the degree of hydration of the cement paste was formulated as a function of the water-to-cement ratio. The contribution of the relative humidity, type of finishing material for the concrete surface, and the substitution level of supplementary cementitious materials to the CO{sub 2} diffusion coefficient in concrete was reflected using various correction factors. The following parameters varying with the recycling scenario were also considered: the carbonatable surface area of concrete crusher-runs and underground phenomena of the decreased CO{sub 2} diffusion coefficient and increased CO{sub 2} concentration. Based on the developed procedure, a case study was conducted for an apartment building with a principal wall system and an office building with a Rahmen system, with the aim of examining the CO{sub 2} uptake of each structural element under different exposure environments during themore » service life and recycling of the building. As input data necessary for the case study, data collected from actual surveys conducted in 2012 in South Korea were used, which included data on the surrounding environments, lifecycle inventory database, life expectancy of structures, and recycling activity scenario. Ultimately, the CO{sub 2} uptake of concrete during a 100-year lifecycle (life expectancy of 40 years and recycling span of 60 years) was estimated to be 15.5%–17% of the CO{sub 2} emissions from concrete production, which roughly corresponds to 18%–21% of the CO{sub 2} emissions from the production of ordinary Portland cement. - Highlights: • CO{sub 2} uptake assessment approach owing to the concrete carbonation is developed. • An equation to directly determine the absorbable CO{sub 2} amount in concrete is proposed. • The carbonatable surface area of concrete crusher-runs for CO{sub 2} uptake is ascertained. • This study provides typical data for uptake and emission of CO{sub 2} in concrete building.« less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [3]
  1. Department of Plant Architectural Engineering, Kyonggi University, San 94-6, Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon, Kyonggi-do 443-760 (Korea, Republic of)
  2. Department of Architectural Engineering, Kyonggi University Graduate School, Seoul 120-702 (Korea, Republic of)
  3. School of Architecture and Architectural Engineering, Hanyang University, 55 Hangyangdaehak-ro, Sangnok-gu, Ansan, Kyeonggi-do 426-791 (Korea, Republic of)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
22334147
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Impact Assessment Review; Journal Volume: 46; Other Information: Copyright (c) 2014 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved.; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ABSORPTION; APARTMENT BUILDINGS; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBONATES; CONCENTRATION RATIO; CONCRETES; EMISSION; OFFICE BUILDINGS; PORTLAND CEMENT; PUBLIC OPINION; RECYCLING; REPUBLIC OF KOREA; SERVICE LIFE