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Title: Co-optimization of Heavy-Duty Fuels and Engines: Cost Benefit Analysis and Implications

Abstract

Heavy-duty vehicles require expensive after treatment systems for control of emissions such as particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) to comply with stringent emission standards. Reduced engine-out emissions could potentially alleviate the emission control burden, and thus bring about reductions in the cost associated with after treatment systems, which translates into savings in vehicle ownership. This study evaluates potential reductions in manufacturing and operating costs of redesigned emission after treatment systems of line-haul heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) with reduced engine-out emissions brought about by co-optimized fuel and engine technologies. Three emissions reduction cases representing conservative, medium, and optimistic engine-out emission reduction benefits are analyzed, compared to a reference case: the total costs of after treatment systems (TCA) of the three cases are reduced to 11,400(1.63 cents/km), 9,100 (1.30 cents/km), and 8,800 (1.26 cents/km), respectively, compared to 12,000 (1.71 cents/km) for the reference case. The largest potential reductions result from reduced diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) usage due to lower NOx emissions. Downsizing after treatment devices is not likely, because the sizes of devices are dependent on not only engine-out emissions, but also other factors such as engine displacement. As a result, sensitivity analysis indicates that the price and usage ofmore » DEF have the largest impacts on TCA reduction.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [3]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
  2. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Knoxville, TN (United States)
  3. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1572645
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5400-74151
Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 21; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; Co-Optima; fuels; engines; heavy-duty; vehicles; transportation; blendstocks; bioblendstocks; particulate matter; nitrogen oxides; NOX; mixing controlled combustion ignition engine; heavy-duty diesel vehicles

Citation Formats

Ou, Longwen, Cai, Hao, Seong, Hee Je, Longman, Douglas E., Dunn, Jennifer B., Storey, John M. E., Toops, Todd J., Pihl, Josh A., Biddy, Mary J., and Thornton, Matthew J. Co-optimization of Heavy-Duty Fuels and Engines: Cost Benefit Analysis and Implications. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.est.9b03690.
Ou, Longwen, Cai, Hao, Seong, Hee Je, Longman, Douglas E., Dunn, Jennifer B., Storey, John M. E., Toops, Todd J., Pihl, Josh A., Biddy, Mary J., & Thornton, Matthew J. Co-optimization of Heavy-Duty Fuels and Engines: Cost Benefit Analysis and Implications. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.9b03690.
Ou, Longwen, Cai, Hao, Seong, Hee Je, Longman, Douglas E., Dunn, Jennifer B., Storey, John M. E., Toops, Todd J., Pihl, Josh A., Biddy, Mary J., and Thornton, Matthew J. Mon . "Co-optimization of Heavy-Duty Fuels and Engines: Cost Benefit Analysis and Implications". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.est.9b03690.
@article{osti_1572645,
title = {Co-optimization of Heavy-Duty Fuels and Engines: Cost Benefit Analysis and Implications},
author = {Ou, Longwen and Cai, Hao and Seong, Hee Je and Longman, Douglas E. and Dunn, Jennifer B. and Storey, John M. E. and Toops, Todd J. and Pihl, Josh A. and Biddy, Mary J. and Thornton, Matthew J.},
abstractNote = {Heavy-duty vehicles require expensive after treatment systems for control of emissions such as particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NOx) to comply with stringent emission standards. Reduced engine-out emissions could potentially alleviate the emission control burden, and thus bring about reductions in the cost associated with after treatment systems, which translates into savings in vehicle ownership. This study evaluates potential reductions in manufacturing and operating costs of redesigned emission after treatment systems of line-haul heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) with reduced engine-out emissions brought about by co-optimized fuel and engine technologies. Three emissions reduction cases representing conservative, medium, and optimistic engine-out emission reduction benefits are analyzed, compared to a reference case: the total costs of after treatment systems (TCA) of the three cases are reduced to 11,400(1.63 cents/km), 9,100 (1.30 cents/km), and 8,800 (1.26 cents/km), respectively, compared to 12,000 (1.71 cents/km) for the reference case. The largest potential reductions result from reduced diesel exhaust fluid (DEF) usage due to lower NOx emissions. Downsizing after treatment devices is not likely, because the sizes of devices are dependent on not only engine-out emissions, but also other factors such as engine displacement. As a result, sensitivity analysis indicates that the price and usage of DEF have the largest impacts on TCA reduction.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.9b03690},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 21,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}

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