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Title: Determining velocity of detonation using high-resolution time domain reflectometry

Abstract

Two methods are presented to make measurements of the length of a coaxial cable with submillimeter and submicrosecond accuracy. If the cable is destroyed by the passage of a strong shock, for instance, from the detonation of an explosive, a measure of the phase velocity of the detonation (VOD) can be obtained with high accuracy (≈0.25%). The first method introduces a series of short Gaussian electrical pulses (<300 ps) into the cable that reflect off the cable end and are compared to the time of the original outgoing pulse by using a fast digitizer (100 gigasamples per second). By curve fitting a Gaussian form to the outgoing and reflected pulses, a measurement of the cable length can be made with subsample accuracy. So, as long as the pulses do not overlap, a large number may be present in the cable at any time allowing pulse repetition rates of 40–135 MHz depending on the cable length. Averaging allows accurate VOD measurements to be made that are comparable with the best traditional techniques. The second method replaces the pulser with a wide-spectrum (0.1–10 GHz) amplified random noise source. A similar setup and digitizer are used before autocorrelating short (80–160 ns) subsamples ofmore » the total waveform to measure the reflected delay time. That is, a smaller amplitude version of the original waveform appears time shifted by twice the transit time in the cable and this time is estimated via autocorrelation. The advantage of this method is that a new subsample needs only to be selected from a time increment in which new spectral information is present for a new measure of the length to be made. In this manner, many more length estimates can be averaged to establish the VOD than with the Gaussian approach. As a result, a detailed description of the implementation of both methods is presented together with an example of the type of data collected and limitations found.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1570625
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1567965
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-19-23529
Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 90; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Rae, Philip John. Determining velocity of detonation using high-resolution time domain reflectometry. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5100750.
Rae, Philip John. Determining velocity of detonation using high-resolution time domain reflectometry. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5100750.
Rae, Philip John. Fri . "Determining velocity of detonation using high-resolution time domain reflectometry". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5100750.
@article{osti_1570625,
title = {Determining velocity of detonation using high-resolution time domain reflectometry},
author = {Rae, Philip John},
abstractNote = {Two methods are presented to make measurements of the length of a coaxial cable with submillimeter and submicrosecond accuracy. If the cable is destroyed by the passage of a strong shock, for instance, from the detonation of an explosive, a measure of the phase velocity of the detonation (VOD) can be obtained with high accuracy (≈0.25%). The first method introduces a series of short Gaussian electrical pulses (<300 ps) into the cable that reflect off the cable end and are compared to the time of the original outgoing pulse by using a fast digitizer (100 gigasamples per second). By curve fitting a Gaussian form to the outgoing and reflected pulses, a measurement of the cable length can be made with subsample accuracy. So, as long as the pulses do not overlap, a large number may be present in the cable at any time allowing pulse repetition rates of 40–135 MHz depending on the cable length. Averaging allows accurate VOD measurements to be made that are comparable with the best traditional techniques. The second method replaces the pulser with a wide-spectrum (0.1–10 GHz) amplified random noise source. A similar setup and digitizer are used before autocorrelating short (80–160 ns) subsamples of the total waveform to measure the reflected delay time. That is, a smaller amplitude version of the original waveform appears time shifted by twice the transit time in the cable and this time is estimated via autocorrelation. The advantage of this method is that a new subsample needs only to be selected from a time increment in which new spectral information is present for a new measure of the length to be made. In this manner, many more length estimates can be averaged to establish the VOD than with the Gaussian approach. As a result, a detailed description of the implementation of both methods is presented together with an example of the type of data collected and limitations found.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5100750},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 8,
volume = 90,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {8}
}

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