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Title: Simulation of Fast-Rise Transients in a Large-Power Transformer Winding

Abstract

A high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) may pose a significant threat to the electrical power grid. In this context, the present study considers here the potential impact of the HEMP early-time component (E1) on the winding of a typical transmission power line transformer. A time-domain, fully electromagnetic, three-dimensional, finite-element model was used to simulate the propagation of an E1-induced voltage surge into the transformer winding. The analysis is focused on the first few turns of the winding, the ones that are impacted by the largest electric field resulting from the applied pulse. The model follows the transient dynamics, while the pulse is traveling along the conductor, and the electric field is established across the insulation gaps through capacitive coupling. The simulations also considered the effect of an electrically floating, “shield” winding conductor. This is used as a countermeasure to improve the voltage uniformity across the winding during fast-rise transients. In this case, the propagation of the E1-induced pulse is compared with that from a slower rising, lightning standard waveform. The simulation results show that the presence of the shield conductor can effectively reduce the peak electric field between winding turns, in the presence of either E1 or lightning waveforms.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
  2. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1511928
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725; EEC-1041877
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility; Journal ID: ISSN 0018-9375
Publisher:
IEEE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
electromagnetic (EM) transient; high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP); power line surge; transformer winding

Citation Formats

Li, Fuhua, Liu, Yilu, Tarditi, Alfonso G., and Li, Zhi. Simulation of Fast-Rise Transients in a Large-Power Transformer Winding. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1109/TEMC.2019.2909280.
Li, Fuhua, Liu, Yilu, Tarditi, Alfonso G., & Li, Zhi. Simulation of Fast-Rise Transients in a Large-Power Transformer Winding. United States. doi:10.1109/TEMC.2019.2909280.
Li, Fuhua, Liu, Yilu, Tarditi, Alfonso G., and Li, Zhi. Wed . "Simulation of Fast-Rise Transients in a Large-Power Transformer Winding". United States. doi:10.1109/TEMC.2019.2909280.
@article{osti_1511928,
title = {Simulation of Fast-Rise Transients in a Large-Power Transformer Winding},
author = {Li, Fuhua and Liu, Yilu and Tarditi, Alfonso G. and Li, Zhi},
abstractNote = {A high-altitude electromagnetic pulse (HEMP) may pose a significant threat to the electrical power grid. In this context, the present study considers here the potential impact of the HEMP early-time component (E1) on the winding of a typical transmission power line transformer. A time-domain, fully electromagnetic, three-dimensional, finite-element model was used to simulate the propagation of an E1-induced voltage surge into the transformer winding. The analysis is focused on the first few turns of the winding, the ones that are impacted by the largest electric field resulting from the applied pulse. The model follows the transient dynamics, while the pulse is traveling along the conductor, and the electric field is established across the insulation gaps through capacitive coupling. The simulations also considered the effect of an electrically floating, “shield” winding conductor. This is used as a countermeasure to improve the voltage uniformity across the winding during fast-rise transients. In this case, the propagation of the E1-induced pulse is compared with that from a slower rising, lightning standard waveform. The simulation results show that the presence of the shield conductor can effectively reduce the peak electric field between winding turns, in the presence of either E1 or lightning waveforms.},
doi = {10.1109/TEMC.2019.2909280},
journal = {IEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}

Journal Article:
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This content will become publicly available on May 1, 2020
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