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Title: Estimation of and barriers to waste heat recovery from harsh environments in industrial processes

Abstract

This paper discusses the industrial potential for waste heat recovery (WHR) in harsh environments – defined as a waste heat stream having either a temperature of at least 650 °C or containing reactive constituents that complicate heat recovery. The analysis covers five industries (steel, aluminum, glass, cement, and lime), chosen based on volume of production, discharge of exhaust gases containing components that present harsh environments, possibility of recovering considerably more heat than currently recovered, and current lack of acceptable WHR options. The total potential energy savings identified in harsh environment waste heat streams from these industries is equal to 15.4% (113.6 TWh) of the process heat energy lost in U.S. manufacturing. Existing technologies and materials for these industries are evaluated and the recoverable waste heat from harsh environment gas for each industrial sector is estimated. Finally, an in-depth summary of each waste heat source shows exactly where waste heat can be recovered and what specific issues must be addressed. The most potential lies within steel blast furnaces (46 TWh/year). Other waste heat streams considered include steel electric arc furnaces (14.1 TWh/year), flat glass (3.6 TWh/year), container glass (5.7 TWh/year), glass fiber (1.1 TWh/year), specialty glass (2.2 TWh/year), aluminum melting furnacesmore » (4.7 TWh/year), cement (17.1 TWh/year), and lime (10.5 TWh/year). Furthermore attempts to recover waste heat in harsh environments have been mostly unsuccessful, advances in research and technology could unlock an enormous potential for energy and cost savings.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [3];  [4]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  2. E3M, Inc., Sugar Land, TX (United States)
  3. U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States)
  4. Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1507869
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Cleaner Production
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 222; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0959-6526
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; Waste heat recovery; Waste heat losses; Industrial process heating; Strategic analysis; Materials for harsh environment; High-temperature

Citation Formats

Vance, David, Nimbalkar, Sachin U., Thekdi, Arvind, Armstrong, Kristina O., Wenning, Thomas, Cresko, Joseph, and Jin, Mingzhou. Estimation of and barriers to waste heat recovery from harsh environments in industrial processes. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.03.011.
Vance, David, Nimbalkar, Sachin U., Thekdi, Arvind, Armstrong, Kristina O., Wenning, Thomas, Cresko, Joseph, & Jin, Mingzhou. Estimation of and barriers to waste heat recovery from harsh environments in industrial processes. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.03.011.
Vance, David, Nimbalkar, Sachin U., Thekdi, Arvind, Armstrong, Kristina O., Wenning, Thomas, Cresko, Joseph, and Jin, Mingzhou. Wed . "Estimation of and barriers to waste heat recovery from harsh environments in industrial processes". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.03.011.
@article{osti_1507869,
title = {Estimation of and barriers to waste heat recovery from harsh environments in industrial processes},
author = {Vance, David and Nimbalkar, Sachin U. and Thekdi, Arvind and Armstrong, Kristina O. and Wenning, Thomas and Cresko, Joseph and Jin, Mingzhou},
abstractNote = {This paper discusses the industrial potential for waste heat recovery (WHR) in harsh environments – defined as a waste heat stream having either a temperature of at least 650 °C or containing reactive constituents that complicate heat recovery. The analysis covers five industries (steel, aluminum, glass, cement, and lime), chosen based on volume of production, discharge of exhaust gases containing components that present harsh environments, possibility of recovering considerably more heat than currently recovered, and current lack of acceptable WHR options. The total potential energy savings identified in harsh environment waste heat streams from these industries is equal to 15.4% (113.6 TWh) of the process heat energy lost in U.S. manufacturing. Existing technologies and materials for these industries are evaluated and the recoverable waste heat from harsh environment gas for each industrial sector is estimated. Finally, an in-depth summary of each waste heat source shows exactly where waste heat can be recovered and what specific issues must be addressed. The most potential lies within steel blast furnaces (46 TWh/year). Other waste heat streams considered include steel electric arc furnaces (14.1 TWh/year), flat glass (3.6 TWh/year), container glass (5.7 TWh/year), glass fiber (1.1 TWh/year), specialty glass (2.2 TWh/year), aluminum melting furnaces (4.7 TWh/year), cement (17.1 TWh/year), and lime (10.5 TWh/year). Furthermore attempts to recover waste heat in harsh environments have been mostly unsuccessful, advances in research and technology could unlock an enormous potential for energy and cost savings.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jclepro.2019.03.011},
journal = {Journal of Cleaner Production},
number = C,
volume = 222,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {3}
}

Journal Article:
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This content will become publicly available on March 6, 2020
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