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Title: Photosynthetic physiology and biomass partitioning in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown in a sinusoidal light regime

Abstract

Photosynthetic microbes respond to changing light environments to balance photosynthetic process with light induced damage and photoinhibition. There have been very few characterizations of photosynthetic physiology or biomass partitioning during the day in mass culture. Understanding the constraints on photosynthetic efficiency and biomass accumulation are necessary for engineering superior strains or cultivation methods. We observed the photosynthetic physiology of nutrient replete Phaeodactylum tricornutum growing in light environments that mimic those found in rapidly mixing, outdoor, low biomass photobioreactors. We found little evidence for photoinhibition or non-photochemical quenching in situ, suggesting photosynthesis remains highly efficient throughout the day. Cells doubled their organic carbon from dawn to dusk and a small percentage – around 20% – of this carbon was allocated to carbohydrates or triacylglycerol. We thus conclude that the self-shading provided by dense culturing of P. tricornutum inhibits the induction of photodamage, and energy dissipation processes that would otherwise lower productivity in an outdoor photobioreactor.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States). Dept. of Biology
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER); Bettencourt Schueller Foundation; National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1435472
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1438018
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0008595
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Algal Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Algal Research Journal Volume: 18 Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 2211-9264
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Phaeodactylum tricornutum; Cultivation; Biomass characterization; Photosynthetic physiology

Citation Formats

Jallet, Denis, Caballero, Michael A., Gallina, Alessandra A., Youngblood, Matthew, and Peers, Graham. Photosynthetic physiology and biomass partitioning in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown in a sinusoidal light regime. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2016.05.014.
Jallet, Denis, Caballero, Michael A., Gallina, Alessandra A., Youngblood, Matthew, & Peers, Graham. Photosynthetic physiology and biomass partitioning in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown in a sinusoidal light regime. United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2016.05.014.
Jallet, Denis, Caballero, Michael A., Gallina, Alessandra A., Youngblood, Matthew, and Peers, Graham. Sat . "Photosynthetic physiology and biomass partitioning in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown in a sinusoidal light regime". United States. doi:10.1016/j.algal.2016.05.014.
@article{osti_1435472,
title = {Photosynthetic physiology and biomass partitioning in the model diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum grown in a sinusoidal light regime},
author = {Jallet, Denis and Caballero, Michael A. and Gallina, Alessandra A. and Youngblood, Matthew and Peers, Graham},
abstractNote = {Photosynthetic microbes respond to changing light environments to balance photosynthetic process with light induced damage and photoinhibition. There have been very few characterizations of photosynthetic physiology or biomass partitioning during the day in mass culture. Understanding the constraints on photosynthetic efficiency and biomass accumulation are necessary for engineering superior strains or cultivation methods. We observed the photosynthetic physiology of nutrient replete Phaeodactylum tricornutum growing in light environments that mimic those found in rapidly mixing, outdoor, low biomass photobioreactors. We found little evidence for photoinhibition or non-photochemical quenching in situ, suggesting photosynthesis remains highly efficient throughout the day. Cells doubled their organic carbon from dawn to dusk and a small percentage – around 20% – of this carbon was allocated to carbohydrates or triacylglycerol. We thus conclude that the self-shading provided by dense culturing of P. tricornutum inhibits the induction of photodamage, and energy dissipation processes that would otherwise lower productivity in an outdoor photobioreactor.},
doi = {10.1016/j.algal.2016.05.014},
journal = {Algal Research},
number = C,
volume = 18,
place = {United States},
year = {2016},
month = {6}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1016/j.algal.2016.05.014

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Cited by: 10 works
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