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Title: Ten simple rules for drawing scientific comics

Institutions around the world are fighting to improve science communication all the time. From calls for journal papers to be simplified to encouraging scientists to take more of an active role through community engagement, there is an impetus to demystify and improve public understanding and engagement with science. Technology has greatly helped expand the range of learning styles that a lecturer can call on to reach people in new ways. Social media outlets like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Tumblr have expanded the reach of science communication within and across scientific disciplines and to the lay public. Here, with all the videos, interactive quizzes, and instant feedback it can be easy to overlook one of the simplest methods for communicating complex ideas: comics.
Authors:
ORCiD logo [1] ; ORCiD logo [2] ;  [3] ;  [4]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Oregon Health & Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)
  2. Cranfield Univ., Bedfordshire (United Kingdom)
  3. Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States); Technische Univ. Munchen, Garching (Germany)
  4. Dassault Systemes, Velizy-Villacoublay (France)
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-127907
Journal ID: ISSN 1553-7358
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
PLoS Computational Biology (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: PLoS Computational Biology (Online); Journal Volume: 14; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1553-7358
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Research Org:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; scientific communication; comics; outreach
OSTI Identifier:
1421336

McDermott, Jason E., Partridge, Matthew, Bromberg, Yana, and Markel, Scott. Ten simple rules for drawing scientific comics. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005845.
McDermott, Jason E., Partridge, Matthew, Bromberg, Yana, & Markel, Scott. Ten simple rules for drawing scientific comics. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005845.
McDermott, Jason E., Partridge, Matthew, Bromberg, Yana, and Markel, Scott. 2018. "Ten simple rules for drawing scientific comics". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005845. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1421336.
@article{osti_1421336,
title = {Ten simple rules for drawing scientific comics},
author = {McDermott, Jason E. and Partridge, Matthew and Bromberg, Yana and Markel, Scott},
abstractNote = {Institutions around the world are fighting to improve science communication all the time. From calls for journal papers to be simplified to encouraging scientists to take more of an active role through community engagement, there is an impetus to demystify and improve public understanding and engagement with science. Technology has greatly helped expand the range of learning styles that a lecturer can call on to reach people in new ways. Social media outlets like Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, and Tumblr have expanded the reach of science communication within and across scientific disciplines and to the lay public. Here, with all the videos, interactive quizzes, and instant feedback it can be easy to overlook one of the simplest methods for communicating complex ideas: comics.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pcbi.1005845},
journal = {PLoS Computational Biology (Online)},
number = 1,
volume = 14,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {1}
}