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Title: Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis

Abstract

Changes in agricultural management can potentially increase the accumulation rate of soil organic carbon (SOC), thereby sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. This study was conducted to quantify potential soil carbon (C) sequestration rates for different crops in response to decreasing tillage intensity or enhancing rotation complexity, and to estimate the duration of time over which sequestration may occur. Analyses of C sequestration rates were completed using a global database of 67 long-term agricultural experiments, consisting of 276 paired treatments. Results indicate, on average, that a change from conventional tillage (CT) to no-till (NT) can sequester 57 ± 14 g C m–2 yr–1, excluding wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-fallow systems which may not result in SOC accumulation with a change from CT to NT. Enhancing rotation complexity can sequester an average 14 ± 11 g C m–2 yr–1, excluding a change from continuous corn (Zea mays L.) to corn-soybean (Glycine max L.) which may not result in a significant accumulation of SOC. Carbon sequestration rates, with a change from CT to NT, can be expected to peak in 5-10 yr with SOC reaching a new equilibrium in 15-20 yr. Following initiation of an enhancement in rotation complexity, SOC may reach a newmore » equilibrium in approximately 40-60 yr. Carbon sequestration rates, estimated for a number of individual crops and crop rotations in this study, can be used in spatial modeling analyses to more accurately predict regional, national, and global C sequestration potentials.« less

Authors:
;
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org.:
Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) (United States); Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1389519
DOI:
10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.002

Citation Formats

West, Tristram O., and Post, Wilfred M. Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis. United States: N. p., 2002. Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.002.
West, Tristram O., & Post, Wilfred M. Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis. United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.002.
West, Tristram O., and Post, Wilfred M. 2002. "Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis". United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.002. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389519. Pub date:Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2002
@article{osti_1389519,
title = {Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis},
author = {West, Tristram O. and Post, Wilfred M.},
abstractNote = {Changes in agricultural management can potentially increase the accumulation rate of soil organic carbon (SOC), thereby sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. This study was conducted to quantify potential soil carbon (C) sequestration rates for different crops in response to decreasing tillage intensity or enhancing rotation complexity, and to estimate the duration of time over which sequestration may occur. Analyses of C sequestration rates were completed using a global database of 67 long-term agricultural experiments, consisting of 276 paired treatments. Results indicate, on average, that a change from conventional tillage (CT) to no-till (NT) can sequester 57 ± 14 g C m–2 yr–1, excluding wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)-fallow systems which may not result in SOC accumulation with a change from CT to NT. Enhancing rotation complexity can sequester an average 14 ± 11 g C m–2 yr–1, excluding a change from continuous corn (Zea mays L.) to corn-soybean (Glycine max L.) which may not result in a significant accumulation of SOC. Carbon sequestration rates, with a change from CT to NT, can be expected to peak in 5-10 yr with SOC reaching a new equilibrium in 15-20 yr. Following initiation of an enhancement in rotation complexity, SOC may reach a new equilibrium in approximately 40-60 yr. Carbon sequestration rates, estimated for a number of individual crops and crop rotations in this study, can be used in spatial modeling analyses to more accurately predict regional, national, and global C sequestration potentials.},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.002},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2002},
month = {1}
}

Works referencing / citing this record:

Practices sustaining soil organic matter and rice yield in a tropical monsoon region
journal, June 2017


Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration Rates by Tillage and Crop Rotation
journal, January 2002

  • West, Tristram O.; Post, Wilfred M.
  • Soil Science Society of America Journal, Vol. 66, Issue 6, p. 1930-1946
  • DOI: 10.2136/sssaj2002.1930

Practices sustaining soil organic matter and rice yield in a tropical monsoon region
journal, June 2017


Short-term effect of tillage intensity on N2O and CO2 emissions
journal, February 2011

  • Boeckx, Pascal; Van Nieuland, Katja; Van Cleemput, Oswald
  • Agronomy for Sustainable Development, Vol. 31, Issue 3
  • DOI: 10.1007/s13593-011-0001-9