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Title: Changes in Soil Carbon Following Afforestation

Quantifying changes in soil C may be an important consideration under large-scale afforestation or reforestation. We reviewed global data on changes in soil C following afforestation, available from 43 published or unpublished studies, encompassing 204 sites. Data were highly variable, with soil C either increasing or decreasing, particularly in young (<10-y) forest stands. Because studies varied in the number of years since forest establishment and the initial soil C content, we calculated change in soil C as a weighted average (i.e. sum of C change divided by sum of years since forest establishment) relative to the soil C content under previous agricultural systems at <10 cm, >10 cm and <30 cm sampling depths. On average, soil C in the <10 cm (or <30 cm) layers generally decreased by 3.46% y –1 (or 0.63% y –1) relative to the initial soil C content during the first five years of afforestation, followed by a decrease in the rate of decline and eventually recovery to C contents found in agricultural soils at about age 30. In plantations older than 30 years, C content was similar to that under the previous agricultural systems within the surface 10 cm of soil, yet at other samplingmore » depths, soil C had increased by between 0.50 and 0.86% y –1. Amounts of C lost or gained by soil are generally small compared with accumulation of C in tree biomass. « less
Authors:
 [1] ;  [2] ;  [1] ;  [1]
  1. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Kingston ACT (Australia)
  2. Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO), Kingston ACT (Australia
Publication Date:
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem; Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
Related Identifiers:
OSTI Identifier:
1389525

Paul, K. I., Polglase, P. J., Nyakuengama, J. G., and Khanna, P. K.. Changes in Soil Carbon Following Afforestation. United States: N. p., Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.008.
Paul, K. I., Polglase, P. J., Nyakuengama, J. G., & Khanna, P. K.. Changes in Soil Carbon Following Afforestation. United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.008.
Paul, K. I., Polglase, P. J., Nyakuengama, J. G., and Khanna, P. K.. 2003. "Changes in Soil Carbon Following Afforestation". United States. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.008. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389525.
@misc{osti_1389525,
title = {Changes in Soil Carbon Following Afforestation},
author = {Paul, K. I. and Polglase, P. J. and Nyakuengama, J. G. and Khanna, P. K.},
abstractNote = {Quantifying changes in soil C may be an important consideration under large-scale afforestation or reforestation. We reviewed global data on changes in soil C following afforestation, available from 43 published or unpublished studies, encompassing 204 sites. Data were highly variable, with soil C either increasing or decreasing, particularly in young (<10-y) forest stands. Because studies varied in the number of years since forest establishment and the initial soil C content, we calculated change in soil C as a weighted average (i.e. sum of C change divided by sum of years since forest establishment) relative to the soil C content under previous agricultural systems at <10 cm, >10 cm and <30 cm sampling depths. On average, soil C in the <10 cm (or <30 cm) layers generally decreased by 3.46% y–1 (or 0.63% y–1) relative to the initial soil C content during the first five years of afforestation, followed by a decrease in the rate of decline and eventually recovery to C contents found in agricultural soils at about age 30. In plantations older than 30 years, C content was similar to that under the previous agricultural systems within the surface 10 cm of soil, yet at other sampling depths, soil C had increased by between 0.50 and 0.86% y–1. Amounts of C lost or gained by soil are generally small compared with accumulation of C in tree biomass.},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.008},
year = {2003},
month = {1} }
  1. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Environmental Systems Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) is a data archive for Earth and environmental science data. The mission of ESS-DIVE is to preserve, expand access to, and improve usability of critical data generated through DOE-sponsored research of terrestrial and subsurface ecosystems. By making ESS research data easily accessible, ESS-DIVE has the potential to advance the scientific understanding and prediction of hydro-biogeochemical and ecosystem processes that occur from bedrock through soil and vegetation to the atmospheric interface.
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