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Title: Changes in Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as a Result of Cultivation

Abstract

We assembed and analyzed a data base of soil organic carbon and nitrogen information from over 1100 profiles in order to explore factors related to the changes in storage of soil organic matter resulting from land conversion. The relationship between cultivated and uncultivated organic carbon and nitrogen storage in soils can be described by regression lines with uncultivated storage on the abscissa, and cultivated storage on the ordinate. The slope of the regression lines is less than 1 indicating that the amount of carbon or nitrogen lost is an increasing fraction of the intial amount stored in the soil. Average carbon loss for soils with high initial carbon is 23% for 1-meter depth. Average nitrogen loss for the same depth is 6%. In addition, for soils with very low uncultivated carbon or nitrogen storage, cultivation results in increases in storage. In soils with the same uncultivated carbon contents, profiles with higher C:N ratios lost more carbon than those with low C:N ratios, suggesting that decomposition of organic matter may, in general, be more limited by microbial ability to break carbon bonds than by nitrogen deficiency.

Authors:
;
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-84OR21400
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org.:
Environmental System Science Data Infrastructure for a Virtual Ecosystem (ESS-DIVE) (United States); Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
OSTI Identifier:
1389523
DOI:
https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.006

Citation Formats

Post, Wilfred M, and Mann, L. K. Changes in Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as a Result of Cultivation. United States: N. p., 2005. Web. doi:10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.006.
Post, Wilfred M, & Mann, L. K. Changes in Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as a Result of Cultivation. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.006
Post, Wilfred M, and Mann, L. K. 2005. "Changes in Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as a Result of Cultivation". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.006. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1389523. Pub date:Sat Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2005
@article{osti_1389523,
title = {Changes in Soil Organic Carbon and Nitrogen as a Result of Cultivation},
author = {Post, Wilfred M and Mann, L. K.},
abstractNote = {We assembed and analyzed a data base of soil organic carbon and nitrogen information from over 1100 profiles in order to explore factors related to the changes in storage of soil organic matter resulting from land conversion. The relationship between cultivated and uncultivated organic carbon and nitrogen storage in soils can be described by regression lines with uncultivated storage on the abscissa, and cultivated storage on the ordinate. The slope of the regression lines is less than 1 indicating that the amount of carbon or nitrogen lost is an increasing fraction of the intial amount stored in the soil. Average carbon loss for soils with high initial carbon is 23% for 1-meter depth. Average nitrogen loss for the same depth is 6%. In addition, for soils with very low uncultivated carbon or nitrogen storage, cultivation results in increases in storage. In soils with the same uncultivated carbon contents, profiles with higher C:N ratios lost more carbon than those with low C:N ratios, suggesting that decomposition of organic matter may, in general, be more limited by microbial ability to break carbon bonds than by nitrogen deficiency.},
doi = {10.3334/CDIAC/TCM.006},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2005},
month = {1}
}