skip to main content

Title: Open data set of live cyanobacterial cells imaged using an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 37)

TODO
Authors:
Publication Date:
Report Number(s):
CXIDB ID 37
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Product Type:
Dataset
Research Org(s):
Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory); Uppsala University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, ...
Sponsoring Org:
Uppsala University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, ...
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Open data set of live cyanobacterial cells imaged using an X-ray laser, Gijs van der Schot et al. Scientific Data, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/TODO
Subject:
XFEL; AMO; Single Particle X-ray Diffraction Imaging; X-ray Free-electorn Lasers; Cyanobium gracile and Synechococcus elongtatus; LCLS
OSTI Identifier:
1245696
  1. The Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank (CXIDB) is a new database which offers scientists from all over the world a unique opportunity to access data from Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) experiments. The main goal of the Coherent X-ray Imaging Data Bank is to create an open repository for CXI experimental data. CXIDB is dedicated to further the goal of making data from Coherent X-ray Imaging (CXI) experiments available to all, as well as archiving it. The website also serves as the reference for the CXI file format, in which most of the experimental data on the database is stored in.
No associated Collections found.
  1. The site characterization data used to develop the conceptual geologic model for the Snake River Plain site in Idaho, as part of phase 1 of the Frontier Observatory for Research in Geothermal Energy (FORGE) initiative. This collection includes data on seismic events, groundwater, geomechanical models,more » gravity surveys, magnetics, resistivity, magnetotellurics (MT), rock physics, stress, the geologic setting, and supporting documentation, including several papers. Also included are 3D models (Petrel and Jewelsuite) of the proposed site. Data for wells INEL-1, WO-2, and USGS-142 have been included as links to separate data collections. These data have been assembled by the Snake River Geothermal Consortium (SRGC), a team of collaborators that includes members from national laboratories, universities, industry, and federal agencies, lead by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Other contributors include the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CEAS), the University of Idaho, Idaho State University, Boise State University, University of Wyoming, University of Oklahoma, Energy and Geoscience Institute-University of Utah, US Geothermal, Baker Hughes Campbell Scientific Inc., Chena Power, US Geological Survey (USGS), Idaho Department of Water Resources, Idaho Geological Survey, and Mink GeoHydro. « less
  2. In the 1960s, thermonuclear bomb tests released significant pulses of radioactive 14C into the atmosphere. This major perturbation allowed scientists to study the dynamics of the global carbon cycle by measuring and observing rates of isotopic exchange. The Radiological Dating Laboratory at the Norwegian Institutemore » of Technology performed 14C measurements in atmospheric CO2 from 1962 to 1993 at a network of ground stations in the Northern and Southern hemispheres. These measurements were supplemented during 1965 with high-altitude (9-12.6 km) air samples collected using aircraft from the Norwegian Air Force. The resulting database, coupled with other 14C data sets, provides a greater understanding of the dynamic carbon reservoir and a crude picture of anomalous sources and sinks at different geographical latitudes. This database is outstanding for its inclusion of early 14C measurements, broad spatial coverage of sampling, consistency of sampling method, and 14C calculation results corrected for isotopic fractionation and radioactive decay. This database replaces previous versions published by the authors and the Radiological Dating Laboratory. Fourteen stations spanning latitudes from Spitsbergen (78° N) to Madagascar (21° S) were used for sampling during the lifetime of the Norwegian program. Some of the stations have data for only a brief period, while others have measurements through 1993. Sampling stations subject to local industrial CO2 contamination were avoided. The sites have sufficient separation to describe the latitudinal distribution of 14C in atmospheric models. The sampling procedure for all the surface (10-2400 m asl) 14C measurements in this database consisted of quantitative absorption of atmospheric CO2 in carbonate-free 0.5 N NaOH solution. The 14C measurements were made in a CO2 proportional counter and calculated (14C) as per mil excess above the normal 14C level defined by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Atmospheric 14C content is finally expressed as 14C, which is the relative deviation of the measured 14C activity from the NIST oxalic acid standard activity, after correction for isotopic fractionation and radioactive decay related to age. The data are organized by sampling station, and each record of the database contains the sampling dates; values for 14C excess (14C) relative to the NIST standard, fractionation 13C (13C) relative to the Pee Dee Belemnite (PDB) standard, and corrected 14C ( 14C) excess; and the standard deviation for 14C. The 14C calculation results presented here are thus corrected for isotopic fractionation and radioactive decay, and constitute the final product of a research effort that has spanned three decades. The 14C station data show a sharp increase in tropospheric radiocarbon levels in the early 1960s and then a decline after the majority of nuclear tests came to an end on August 5, 1963 (Test Ban Treaty). The sharp peaks in tropospheric radiocarbon in the early 1960s are more pronounced in the Northern Hemisphere, reflecting the location of most atomic weapons tests. The measurements show large seasonal variations in the 14C level during the early 1960s mainly as a result of springtime transport of bomb 14C from the stratosphere. During the 1970s, the seasonal variations are smaller and due partly to seasonal variations in CO2 from fossil-fuel emissions. The rate of decrease of atmospheric radiocarbon provides a check on the exchange constants of the atmosphere and ocean. This report and all data it describes are available from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) without charge. The Nydal and Lövseth atmospheric 14C database comprises 21 data files totaling 0.2 megabytes in size. The following report describes the sampling methods and analysis. In addition, the report includes a complete discussion of CDIAC's data-processing efforts, the contents and format of the data files, and a reprint of a Nydal and Lövseth journal article. « less
  3. RANDAB represents the worlds largest collection of stratospheric and upper tropospheric radionuclide data. The database contains results of measurements made from 1957 to 1983 during the ASHCAN, STARDUST, AIRSTREAM, and High Altitude Sampling Program (HASP) projects. More than 20,000 filters were collected during this periodmore » and analyzed for approximately 40 different radionuclides. All of the available data characterizing each filter are included in RANDAB. RANDAB offers gas samples characterizing the tritium, radon and 14CO2 concentration in stratospheric air. Only a limited amount of data is available for radon because of analytical and sampling problems. The tritium data were provided graciously by Dr. Allen Mason of Los Alamos Laboratory and Dr. H. G. Oslund of the Tritium Laboratory, University of Miami. The second database, TRACDAB, contains more than 1000 stratospheric trace gas measurements for the period 1974 to 1983. These samples were collected during Project AIRSTREAM. During the years 1974 to 1976, the samples were analyzed at EML. Subsequently, Washington State University (1976-1979) and the Oregon Graduate Institute for Science & Technology (formerly the Oregon Graduate Center 1980-1983) were under contract to EML to analyze AIRSTREAM gas samples. During the period 1974-1983, 980 gas samples were analyzed for one or more of the following gases CCl3F, CCl2F2, CCl4, CH3CCl3, SF6, N20, CO2, CH4, and carbonyl sulfide (COS). To learn more about the naming of halocarbons (CFCs, HFCs, HCFCs, and halons), go to http://cdiac.ess-dive.lbl.gov/pns/cfcinfo.html. « less
  4. The Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technology Office (GTO) provides RD&D funding for geothermal exploration technologies with the goal of lowering the risks and costs of geothermal development and exploration. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) was tasked with developing a metric in 2012 to measuremore » the impacts of this RD&D funding on the cost and time required for exploration activities. The development of this cost and time metric included collecting cost and time data for exploration techniques, creating a baseline suite of exploration techniques to which future exploration cost and time improvements can be compared, and developing an online tool for graphically showing potential project impacts (all available at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Gateway: Geothermal). This paper describes the methodology used to define the baseline exploration suite of techniques (baseline), as well as the approach that was used to create the cost and time data set that populates the baseline. The resulting product, an online tool for measuring impact, and the aggregated cost and time data are available on the Open Energy Information website (OpenEI, http://en.openei.org) for public access. - Published 01/01/2013 by US National Renewable Energy Laboratory NREL. « less
  5. The Carbon Dioxide Research Group, Scripps Institution of Oceanography, University of California, San Diego, has provided this data set, which includes long-term measurements of near-surface atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 10 locations spanning latitudes 82°N to 90°S. Most of the data are based on replicated (collectedmore » at the same time and place) flask samples taken at intervals of approximately one week to one month and subsequently subjected to infrared analysis. Periods of record begin in various years, ranging from 1957 (for the South Pole station) to 1985 (for Alert, Canada), and all flask data records except for Christmas Island and Baring Head, New Zealand extend through year 2001. Christmas Island data end with August, 2001 and Baring Head data end with October 2001. Weekly averages of continuous data from Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii, are available back to March 1958. Similar weekly averages are also available for La Jolla, California, from November 1972 to October 1975, and for the South Pole from June 1960 to October 1963. These long-term records of atmospheric CO2 concentration complement the continuous records made by SIO, and also complement the long term flask records of the Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. All these data are useful for characterizing seasonal and geographical variations in atmospheric CO2 over several years, and for assessing results of global carbon models. « less