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Title: Structural health monitoring for ship structures

Abstract

Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications onmore » ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
  2. NSWC, CADEROCK
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
990775
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-09-04362; LA-UR-09-4362
TRN: US201020%%588
DOE Contract Number:  
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: International Workshop on Structural Health Monitoring ; September 9, 2009 ; Palo Alto, CA
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42; 45; ALUMINIUM; CLASSIFICATION; COMPRESSION; DATA ACQUISITION; EVALUATION; MANAGEMENT; MONITORING; PATTERN RECOGNITION

Citation Formats

Farrar, Charles, Park, Gyuhae, Angel, Marian, Bement, Matthew, and Salvino, Liming. Structural health monitoring for ship structures. United States: N. p., 2009. Web.
Farrar, Charles, Park, Gyuhae, Angel, Marian, Bement, Matthew, & Salvino, Liming. Structural health monitoring for ship structures. United States.
Farrar, Charles, Park, Gyuhae, Angel, Marian, Bement, Matthew, and Salvino, Liming. Thu . "Structural health monitoring for ship structures". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/990775.
@article{osti_990775,
title = {Structural health monitoring for ship structures},
author = {Farrar, Charles and Park, Gyuhae and Angel, Marian and Bement, Matthew and Salvino, Liming},
abstractNote = {Currently the Office of Naval Research is supporting the development of structural health monitoring (SHM) technology for U.S. Navy ship structures. This application is particularly challenging because of the physical size of these structures, the widely varying and often extreme operational and environmental conditions associated with these ships missions, lack of data from known damage conditions, limited sensing that was not designed specifically for SHM, and the management of the vast amounts of data that can be collected during a mission. This paper will first define a statistical pattern recognition paradigm for SHM by describing the four steps of (1) Operational Evaluation, (2) Data Acquisition, (3) Feature Extraction, and (4) Statistical Classification of Features as they apply to ship structures. Note that inherent in the last three steps of this process are additional tasks of data cleansing, compression, normalization and fusion. The presentation will discuss ship structure SHM challenges in the context of applying various SHM approaches to sea trials data measured on an aluminum multi-hull high-speed ship, the HSV-2 Swift. To conclude, the paper will discuss several outstanding issues that need to be addressed before SHM can make the transition from a research topic to actual field applications on ship structures and suggest approaches for addressing these issues.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2009},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2009}
}

Conference:
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