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Title: Rare Isotope Discoveries with Digital Electronics

Abstract

The discovery of the new isotopes 109Xe and 105Te was enabled by the application of a new experimental method using selective pulse shape storage from silicon detectors with digital signal processing electronics. Essential data processing algorithms were developed, which are able to find unique nuclear decay signatures, such as overlapping alpha decay induced signals. An experiment using this method led to the simultaneous detection of isotopes with dramatically different half lives T1/2(109Xe)=13(2) ms and T1/2(105Te)=620(70) ns. The ground state decay energies have been measured to be E (109Xe)=4062(7) keV and E (105Te)=4703(5) keV via observation of correlated events in the decay chain 109Xe 105Te 101Sn.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [1]
  1. ORNL
  2. University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)
  3. Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU)
  4. University of Liverpool
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
932040
DOE Contract Number:
DE-AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: CAARI 2006: 19th Int'l Conf. on the Application of Accelerators in Research and Industry, Fort Worth, TX, USA, 20060820, 20060825
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; ALGORITHMS; ALPHA DECAY; CHAINS; DATA PROCESSING; DECAY; DETECTION; GROUND STATES; NUCLEAR DECAY; PROCESSING; SHAPE; SILICON; STORAGE; alpha decay; charged particle spectroscopy

Citation Formats

Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz, Gross, Carl J, Korgul, A., Liddick, S. N., Mazzocchi, C., Page, R. D., and Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr. Rare Isotope Discoveries with Digital Electronics. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz, Gross, Carl J, Korgul, A., Liddick, S. N., Mazzocchi, C., Page, R. D., & Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr. Rare Isotope Discoveries with Digital Electronics. United States.
Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz, Gross, Carl J, Korgul, A., Liddick, S. N., Mazzocchi, C., Page, R. D., and Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr. Mon . "Rare Isotope Discoveries with Digital Electronics". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_932040,
title = {Rare Isotope Discoveries with Digital Electronics},
author = {Grzywacz, Robert Kazimierz and Gross, Carl J and Korgul, A. and Liddick, S. N. and Mazzocchi, C. and Page, R. D. and Rykaczewski, Krzysztof Piotr},
abstractNote = {The discovery of the new isotopes 109Xe and 105Te was enabled by the application of a new experimental method using selective pulse shape storage from silicon detectors with digital signal processing electronics. Essential data processing algorithms were developed, which are able to find unique nuclear decay signatures, such as overlapping alpha decay induced signals. An experiment using this method led to the simultaneous detection of isotopes with dramatically different half lives T1/2(109Xe)=13(2) ms and T1/2(105Te)=620(70) ns. The ground state decay energies have been measured to be E (109Xe)=4062(7) keV and E (105Te)=4703(5) keV via observation of correlated events in the decay chain 109Xe 105Te 101Sn.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • No abstract prepared.
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