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Title: Building Towards Discovery: Preparing for New Physics at the LHC [Final papers]

Abstract

Particle physics today is at a crossroads. The Standard Model (SM) has survived four decades of experimental scrutiny and spurred multiple landmark discoveries, culminating with the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Yet we know that this model is incomplete. We live in a universe dominated by matter and energy unaccounted for by the SM– and the Higgs boson itself is improbably light. It falls to the current generation of high-energy physicists to go beyond the model and enter a new era of discovery. Andeen is leading a new research group at the University of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin) that is endeavoring to reveal novel physical phenomena through the discovery of new particles with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. A key element of our experience thus far has been collaborating closely with theorists to identify both interesting new physics models. In addition we work closely with electrical engineers in detector development. Our approach is therefore unique in its integration of theory, analysis and instrumentation, and is encapsulated in a three-pronged strategy. First is the essential task of analyzing our rapidly expanding dataset. I am directing my group in searches for vector-like quarks (VLQs).more » Should they exist, these hypothetical particles would indicate physics scenarios beyond the SM. Experimental constraints suggest VLQs decay preferentially to a third generation quark and a Higgs, W or Z boson. Today at 13 TeV, both multi-lepton (electron and muon) and jet substructure signatures are sensitive to identifying the VLQ decay products. The large Run 2 dataset (collected through 2018) of up to 150 fb -1 will allow us to simultaneously use multi-lepton signatures with jet-substructure in searches for new physics. UT-Austin is well positioned to be a leader in this area. Prof. P. Onyisi’s postdoctoral researchers and graduate students are searching for ttH signatures in three- and four-lepton channels and we benefit from their experience. We are also aided by the availability of the Texas Advanced Computing Center, which provides us with easy access to several high performance computing (HPC) systems. My previous experience in VLQ searches propels the work today. I have published both the first investigation into the single production of top partners (signatures of composite Higgs Models) of any LHC experiment 1 as well as one of the first analyses utilizing jet-substructure techniques to search for the single production of vector-like quarks. 2 Adding to this is my group’s work with the Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter, the primary instrument we use in detecting electrons. Second, my group is contributing to the operations of the LAr calorimeter while preparing to install and commission new electronic hardware (the Phase 1 upgrade) to this crucial component of the ATLAS detector. I have played a leading role in the development of a critical, radiation-hard, high-speed Analog-to-Digital Convertor (ADC) that is essential inselecting data collected by the LAr calorimeter. 3 This upgrade will improve the e!ciency with which we can select events in our detector. Postdoctoral researcher N. Nikiforou (based at CERN May 2016 onward) and graduate students (one based at CERN from the start of 2018 onward, with one additional graduate students from summer 2018) are growing our already deep experience in the operation of the LAr calorimeter to prepare for installation and commissioning of the new trigger readout in 2018-2019. My group will then be positioned to be the first to exploit the potential of the improved triggers in our multi-lepton searches for new physics. Third, a suite of preparations for a major detector upgrade, scheduled to be completed in 2024, are underway. My group is building hardware that will improve the electronic readout of the ATLAS detector. I am partnering with a group in the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department at UT-Austin (Prof. N. Sun) to employ his work at the cutting edge of ADC research. We will support an ECE grad student for the layout of this design, and collaborate with engineering groups at Nevis Laboratory and the Electrical Engineering Department (Prof. P. Kinget) at Columbia University to integrate our ADC with gain selection circuits. We will provide this critical component of the ASIC at the challenging boundary of the analog and digital signals in the LAr calorimeter readout chain. Furthermore UT-Austin will lead the testing of this device during development and production (approximately 55,000 four-channel chips). This effort compliments my work as the deliverables manager for the LAr front-end ASICs for the US ATLAS HL-LHC project and strengthens the US commitment to that upgrade.In so doing, my group at the UT-Austin will be at the forefront of efforts to probe the structure of the universe to an unmatched degree both at the current LHC and with its future upgrades. Through both the ongoing analysis of data at the ATLAS detector and improvements to the detector itself, an answer to what lies beyond the SM may come within our grasp. My background in instrumentation and analysis allows my group to establish a singular research effort on the ATLAS experiment. In addition to answering fundamental questions about the subatomic world, the technologies developed could advance the broader scientific community and result in valuable spin-offs.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), High Energy Physics (HEP) (SC-25)
OSTI Identifier:
1527366
Report Number(s):
DOE-SC0017932
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0017932
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS

Citation Formats

Andeen, Timothy. Building Towards Discovery: Preparing for New Physics at the LHC [Final papers]. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2172/1527366.
Andeen, Timothy. Building Towards Discovery: Preparing for New Physics at the LHC [Final papers]. United States. doi:10.2172/1527366.
Andeen, Timothy. Sat . "Building Towards Discovery: Preparing for New Physics at the LHC [Final papers]". United States. doi:10.2172/1527366. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1527366.
@article{osti_1527366,
title = {Building Towards Discovery: Preparing for New Physics at the LHC [Final papers]},
author = {Andeen, Timothy},
abstractNote = {Particle physics today is at a crossroads. The Standard Model (SM) has survived four decades of experimental scrutiny and spurred multiple landmark discoveries, culminating with the 2012 discovery of the Higgs boson at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Yet we know that this model is incomplete. We live in a universe dominated by matter and energy unaccounted for by the SM– and the Higgs boson itself is improbably light. It falls to the current generation of high-energy physicists to go beyond the model and enter a new era of discovery. Andeen is leading a new research group at the University of Texas at Austin (UT-Austin) that is endeavoring to reveal novel physical phenomena through the discovery of new particles with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. A key element of our experience thus far has been collaborating closely with theorists to identify both interesting new physics models. In addition we work closely with electrical engineers in detector development. Our approach is therefore unique in its integration of theory, analysis and instrumentation, and is encapsulated in a three-pronged strategy. First is the essential task of analyzing our rapidly expanding dataset. I am directing my group in searches for vector-like quarks (VLQs). Should they exist, these hypothetical particles would indicate physics scenarios beyond the SM. Experimental constraints suggest VLQs decay preferentially to a third generation quark and a Higgs, W or Z boson. Today at 13 TeV, both multi-lepton (electron and muon) and jet substructure signatures are sensitive to identifying the VLQ decay products. The large Run 2 dataset (collected through 2018) of up to 150 fb-1 will allow us to simultaneously use multi-lepton signatures with jet-substructure in searches for new physics. UT-Austin is well positioned to be a leader in this area. Prof. P. Onyisi’s postdoctoral researchers and graduate students are searching for ttH signatures in three- and four-lepton channels and we benefit from their experience. We are also aided by the availability of the Texas Advanced Computing Center, which provides us with easy access to several high performance computing (HPC) systems. My previous experience in VLQ searches propels the work today. I have published both the first investigation into the single production of top partners (signatures of composite Higgs Models) of any LHC experiment 1 as well as one of the first analyses utilizing jet-substructure techniques to search for the single production of vector-like quarks. 2 Adding to this is my group’s work with the Liquid Argon (LAr) calorimeter, the primary instrument we use in detecting electrons. Second, my group is contributing to the operations of the LAr calorimeter while preparing to install and commission new electronic hardware (the Phase 1 upgrade) to this crucial component of the ATLAS detector. I have played a leading role in the development of a critical, radiation-hard, high-speed Analog-to-Digital Convertor (ADC) that is essential inselecting data collected by the LAr calorimeter. 3 This upgrade will improve the e!ciency with which we can select events in our detector. Postdoctoral researcher N. Nikiforou (based at CERN May 2016 onward) and graduate students (one based at CERN from the start of 2018 onward, with one additional graduate students from summer 2018) are growing our already deep experience in the operation of the LAr calorimeter to prepare for installation and commissioning of the new trigger readout in 2018-2019. My group will then be positioned to be the first to exploit the potential of the improved triggers in our multi-lepton searches for new physics. Third, a suite of preparations for a major detector upgrade, scheduled to be completed in 2024, are underway. My group is building hardware that will improve the electronic readout of the ATLAS detector. I am partnering with a group in the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Department at UT-Austin (Prof. N. Sun) to employ his work at the cutting edge of ADC research. We will support an ECE grad student for the layout of this design, and collaborate with engineering groups at Nevis Laboratory and the Electrical Engineering Department (Prof. P. Kinget) at Columbia University to integrate our ADC with gain selection circuits. We will provide this critical component of the ASIC at the challenging boundary of the analog and digital signals in the LAr calorimeter readout chain. Furthermore UT-Austin will lead the testing of this device during development and production (approximately 55,000 four-channel chips). This effort compliments my work as the deliverables manager for the LAr front-end ASICs for the US ATLAS HL-LHC project and strengthens the US commitment to that upgrade.In so doing, my group at the UT-Austin will be at the forefront of efforts to probe the structure of the universe to an unmatched degree both at the current LHC and with its future upgrades. Through both the ongoing analysis of data at the ATLAS detector and improvements to the detector itself, an answer to what lies beyond the SM may come within our grasp. My background in instrumentation and analysis allows my group to establish a singular research effort on the ATLAS experiment. In addition to answering fundamental questions about the subatomic world, the technologies developed could advance the broader scientific community and result in valuable spin-offs.},
doi = {10.2172/1527366},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {6}
}