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Title: Carbon Dioxide Separation with Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes

Abstract

Supported liquid membranes are a class of materials that allow the researcher to utilize the wealth of knowledge available on liquid properties as a direct guide in the development of a capture technology. These membranes also have the advantage of liquid phase diffusivities higher than those observed in polymeric membranes which grant proportionally greater permeabilities. The primary shortcoming of the supported liquid membranes demonstrated in past research has been the lack of stability caused by volatilization of the transport liquid. Ionic liquids, which possess high carbon dioxide solubility relative to light gases such as hydrogen, are an excellent candidate for this type of membrane since they have negligible vapor pressure and are not susceptible to evaporation. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of several ionic liquids, including 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifuoromethylsulfonyl)imide, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium nitrate, and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium sulfate in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of carbon dioxide from streams containing hydrogen. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame lent expertise in ionic liquid synthesis and characterization, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated the resulting materials for membrane performance. Initial results have been very promising with carbonmore » dioxide permeabilities as high as 950 barrers and significant improvements in carbon dioxide/hydrogen selectivity over conventional polymers at 37C and at elevated temperatures. Results include a comparison of the performance of several ionic liquids and a number of supports as well as a discussion of innovative fabrication techniques currently under development.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE - Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
913401
Report Number(s):
DOE/NETL-IR-2007-124
TRN: US200802%%807
DOE Contract Number:
None cited
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: AIChE 2007 Spring National Meeting, Houston, TX, April 22-27, 2007; Related Information: Brief abstract has been inserted into the front of the extended abstract.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; CARBON; CARBON DIOXIDE; EVAPORATION; FABRICATION; GASES; HYDROGEN; MEMBRANES; POLYMERS; SOLUBILITY; STABILITY; SULFATES; SUPPORTED LIQUID MEMBRANES; SYNTHESIS; TRANSPORT; VAPOR PRESSURE

Citation Formats

Luebke, D.R., Ilconich, J.B., Myers, C.R., and Pennline, H.W. Carbon Dioxide Separation with Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes. United States: N. p., 2007. Web.
Luebke, D.R., Ilconich, J.B., Myers, C.R., & Pennline, H.W. Carbon Dioxide Separation with Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes. United States.
Luebke, D.R., Ilconich, J.B., Myers, C.R., and Pennline, H.W. Sun . "Carbon Dioxide Separation with Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/913401.
@article{osti_913401,
title = {Carbon Dioxide Separation with Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes},
author = {Luebke, D.R. and Ilconich, J.B. and Myers, C.R. and Pennline, H.W.},
abstractNote = {Supported liquid membranes are a class of materials that allow the researcher to utilize the wealth of knowledge available on liquid properties as a direct guide in the development of a capture technology. These membranes also have the advantage of liquid phase diffusivities higher than those observed in polymeric membranes which grant proportionally greater permeabilities. The primary shortcoming of the supported liquid membranes demonstrated in past research has been the lack of stability caused by volatilization of the transport liquid. Ionic liquids, which possess high carbon dioxide solubility relative to light gases such as hydrogen, are an excellent candidate for this type of membrane since they have negligible vapor pressure and are not susceptible to evaporation. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of several ionic liquids, including 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifuoromethylsulfonyl)imide, 1-butyl-3-methyl-imidazolium nitrate, and 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium sulfate in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of carbon dioxide from streams containing hydrogen. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame lent expertise in ionic liquid synthesis and characterization, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated the resulting materials for membrane performance. Initial results have been very promising with carbon dioxide permeabilities as high as 950 barrers and significant improvements in carbon dioxide/hydrogen selectivity over conventional polymers at 37C and at elevated temperatures. Results include a comparison of the performance of several ionic liquids and a number of supports as well as a discussion of innovative fabrication techniques currently under development.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007},
month = {Sun Apr 01 00:00:00 EDT 2007}
}

Conference:
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  • None provided.
  • A practical form of CO2 capture at water-gas shift conditions in the IGCC process could serve the dual function of producing a pure CO2 stream for sequestration and forcing the equilibrium-limited shift reaction to completion enriching the stream in H2. The shift temperatures, ranging from the low temperature shift condition of 260°C to the gasification condition of 900°C, limit capture options by diminishing associative interactions which favor removal of CO2 from the gas stream. Certain sorption interactions, such as carbonate formation, remain available but generally involve exceptionally high sorbent regeneration energies that contribute heavily to parasitic power losses. Carbon dioxidemore » selective membranes need only establish an equilibrium between the gas phase and sorption states in order to transport CO2, giving them a potential energetic advantage over other technologies. Supported liquid membranes take advantage of high, liquid phase diffusivities and a solution diffusion mechanism similar to that observed in polymeric membranes to achieve superior permeabilities and selectivites. The primary shortcoming of the supported liquid membranes demonstrated in past research has been the lack of stability caused by volatilization of the transport liquid. Ionic liquids, which possess high CO2 solubility relative to light gases such as H2, are excellent candidates for this type of membrane since they have negligible vapor pressure and are not susceptible to evaporation. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of ionic liquids including 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifuoromethylsulfonyl)imide in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of CO2 from streams containing H2. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame synthesized and characterized ionic liquids, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated the resulting materials for membrane performance. Improvements to the ionic liquid and support have allowed testing of these supported ionic liquid membranes at temperatures up to 300°C without loss of support mechanical stability or degradation of the ionic liquid. Substantial improvements in selectivity have also been observed at elevated temperature with the best membrane currently achieving optimum performance at 75°C.« less
  • No abstract prepared.
  • As compared to other gas separation techniques, membranes have several advantages which can include low capital cost, relatively low energy usage and scalability. While it could be possible to synthesize the ideal polymer for membrane separation of carbon dioxide from fuel gas, it would be very intensive in terms of money and time. Supported liquid membranes allow the researcher to utilize the wealth of knowledge available on liquid properties. Ionic liquids, which can be useful in capturing CO2 from fuel gas because they posses high CO2 solubility in the ionic liquid relative to H2, are an excellent candidate for thismore » type of membrane. Ionic liquids are not susceptible to evaporation due to their negligible vapor pressure and thus eliminate the main problem typically seen with supported liquid membranes. A study has been conducted evaluating the use of the ionic liquid 1-hexyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifuoromethylsulfonyl)imide in supported ionic liquid membranes for the capture of CO2 from streams containing H2. In a joint project, the ionic liquid was synthesized and characterized at the University of Notre Dame, incorporated into a polymeric matrix, and tested at the National Energy Technology Laboratory. Initial results have been very promising with calculated CO2 permeabilities as high as 950 barrers and significant improvements in CO2/H2 selectivity over the unmodified polymer at 37 oC along with promising results at elevated temperatures. In addition to performance, the study included examining the choice of polymeric supports on performance and membrane stability in more realistic operating conditions. Also included in this study was an evaluation of novel approaches to incorporate the ionic liquid into polymer matrices to optimize the performance and stability of the membranes.« less
  • The integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) is widely viewed as a promising technology for the large scale production of energy in a carbon constrained world. These cycles, which include gasification, contaminant removal, water-gas shift, CO2 capture and compression, and combustion of the reduced-carbon fuel gas in a turbine, often have significant efficiency advantages over conventional combustion technologies. A CO2 selective membrane capable of maintaining performance at conditions approaching those of low temperature water-gas shift (260oC) could facilitate the production of carbon-neutral energy by simultaneously driving the shift reaction to completion and concentrating CO2 for sequestration. Supported ionic liquid membranes (SILMs)more » have been previously evaluated for this application and determined to be physically and chemically stable to temperatures in excess of 300oC. These membranes were based on ionic liquids which interacted physically with CO2 and diminished considerably in selectivity at higher temperatures. To alleviate this problem, the original ionic liquids were replaced with ionic liquids able to form chemical complexes with CO2. These complexing ionic liquid membranes have a local maximum in selectivity which is observed at increasing temperatures for more stable complexes. Efforts are currently underway to develop ionic liquids with selectivity maxima at temperatures greater than 75oC, the best result to date, but other practical concerns must also be addressed if the membrane is to be realistically expected to function under water-gas shift conditions. A CO2 selective membrane must function not only at high temperature, but also in the presence of all the reactants and contaminants likely to be present in coal-derived fuel gas, including water, CO, and H2S. A study has been undertaken which examines the effects of each of these gases on both complexing and physically interacting supported liquid membranes. In a joint project, researchers at the University of Notre Dame synthesized and characterized ionic liquids, and researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory incorporated candidate ionic liquids into supports and evaluated the resulting materials for membrane performance.« less