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Title: Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.

Abstract

Frictional contact results in surface and subsurface damage that could influence the performance, aging, and reliability of moving mechanical assemblies. Changes in surface roughness, hardness, grain size and texture often occur during the initial run-in period, resulting in the evolution of subsurface layers with characteristic microstructural features that are different from those of the bulk. The objective of this LDRD funded research was to model friction-induced microstructures. In order to accomplish this objective, novel experimental techniques were developed to make friction measurements on single crystal surfaces along specific crystallographic surfaces. Focused ion beam techniques were used to prepare cross-sections of wear scars, and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and TEM to understand the deformation, orientation changes, and recrystallization that are associated with sliding wear. The extent of subsurface deformation and the coefficient of friction were strongly dependent on the crystal orientation. These experimental observations and insights were used to develop and validate phenomenological models. A phenomenological model was developed to elucidate the relationships between deformation, microstructure formation, and friction during wear. The contact mechanics problem was described by well-known mathematical solutions for the stresses during sliding friction. Crystal plasticity theory was used to describe the evolution of dislocation content in themore » worn material, which in turn provided an estimate of the characteristic microstructural feature size as a function of the imposed strain. An analysis of grain boundary sliding in ultra-fine-grained material provided a mechanism for lubrication, and model predictions of the contribution of grain boundary sliding (relative to plastic deformation) to lubrication were in good qualitative agreement with experimental evidence. A nanomechanics-based approach has been developed for characterizing the mechanical response of wear surfaces. Coatings are often required to mitigate friction and wear. Amongst other factors, plastic deformation of the substrate determines the coating-substrate interface reliability. Finite element modeling has been applied to predict the plastic deformation for the specific case of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated Ni alloy substrates.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ; ; ;  [2]
  1. (University of Minnesota)
  2. (New Mexico Institure of Mining and Technology)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Laboratories
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
902880
Report Number(s):
SAND2006-7028
TRN: US200720%%239
DOE Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; NICKEL ALLOYS; COATINGS; CARBON; DEFORMATION; MICROSTRUCTURE; MONOCRYSTALS; RECRYSTALLIZATION; SLIDING FRICTION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; Friction-Mathematical models.; Microstructure-Materials-Analysis.; Mechanical movements.; Microstructure-Mathematical models.; Friction-Measurement.

Citation Formats

Michael, Joseph Richard, Prasad, Somuri V., Jungk, John Michael, Cordill, Megan J., Bammann, Douglas J., Battaile, Corbett Chandler, Moody, Neville Reid, and Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha. Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.2172/902880.
Michael, Joseph Richard, Prasad, Somuri V., Jungk, John Michael, Cordill, Megan J., Bammann, Douglas J., Battaile, Corbett Chandler, Moody, Neville Reid, & Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha. Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.. United States. doi:10.2172/902880.
Michael, Joseph Richard, Prasad, Somuri V., Jungk, John Michael, Cordill, Megan J., Bammann, Douglas J., Battaile, Corbett Chandler, Moody, Neville Reid, and Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha. Fri . "Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.". United States. doi:10.2172/902880. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/902880.
@article{osti_902880,
title = {Modeling of friction-induced deformation and microstructures.},
author = {Michael, Joseph Richard and Prasad, Somuri V. and Jungk, John Michael and Cordill, Megan J. and Bammann, Douglas J. and Battaile, Corbett Chandler and Moody, Neville Reid and Majumdar, Bhaskar Sinha},
abstractNote = {Frictional contact results in surface and subsurface damage that could influence the performance, aging, and reliability of moving mechanical assemblies. Changes in surface roughness, hardness, grain size and texture often occur during the initial run-in period, resulting in the evolution of subsurface layers with characteristic microstructural features that are different from those of the bulk. The objective of this LDRD funded research was to model friction-induced microstructures. In order to accomplish this objective, novel experimental techniques were developed to make friction measurements on single crystal surfaces along specific crystallographic surfaces. Focused ion beam techniques were used to prepare cross-sections of wear scars, and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and TEM to understand the deformation, orientation changes, and recrystallization that are associated with sliding wear. The extent of subsurface deformation and the coefficient of friction were strongly dependent on the crystal orientation. These experimental observations and insights were used to develop and validate phenomenological models. A phenomenological model was developed to elucidate the relationships between deformation, microstructure formation, and friction during wear. The contact mechanics problem was described by well-known mathematical solutions for the stresses during sliding friction. Crystal plasticity theory was used to describe the evolution of dislocation content in the worn material, which in turn provided an estimate of the characteristic microstructural feature size as a function of the imposed strain. An analysis of grain boundary sliding in ultra-fine-grained material provided a mechanism for lubrication, and model predictions of the contribution of grain boundary sliding (relative to plastic deformation) to lubrication were in good qualitative agreement with experimental evidence. A nanomechanics-based approach has been developed for characterizing the mechanical response of wear surfaces. Coatings are often required to mitigate friction and wear. Amongst other factors, plastic deformation of the substrate determines the coating-substrate interface reliability. Finite element modeling has been applied to predict the plastic deformation for the specific case of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated Ni alloy substrates.},
doi = {10.2172/902880},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2006},
month = {12}
}

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