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Title: Growth of age-0 steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Pine River watershed, Alcona County, Michigan

Abstract

We sampled ten sites within the Pine River watershed, Alcona County, Michigan. In 2001, age-0 steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were collected to determine growth rates. In 2002, emergence dates of steelhead were determined by observational studies and age-0 steelhead and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) were collected to determine growth rates. Steelhead emergence occurred from late June to mid-July 2002. Growth rates of both species varied among branches within the watershed (P<0.05). Steelhead growth varied from 0.24 to 0.42 mm/day and brook trout growth varied from 0.22 to 0.37 mm/day.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
901752
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-53627
Journal ID: ISSN 0270-5060; JFREDW; TRN: US200715%%51
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Freshwater Ecology, 21(4):687-692; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; MICHIGAN; RIVERS; TROUT; WATERSHEDS; GROWTH; steelhead trout, brook trout, growth, emergence, Michigan, watershed

Citation Formats

Bellgraph, Brian J., Thompson, Bradley E., Hayes, Daniel B., and Riley, Timothy S. Growth of age-0 steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Pine River watershed, Alcona County, Michigan. United States: N. p., 2006. Web. doi:10.1080/02705060.2006.9664131.
Bellgraph, Brian J., Thompson, Bradley E., Hayes, Daniel B., & Riley, Timothy S. Growth of age-0 steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Pine River watershed, Alcona County, Michigan. United States. doi:10.1080/02705060.2006.9664131.
Bellgraph, Brian J., Thompson, Bradley E., Hayes, Daniel B., and Riley, Timothy S. 2006. "Growth of age-0 steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Pine River watershed, Alcona County, Michigan". United States. doi:10.1080/02705060.2006.9664131.
@article{osti_901752,
title = {Growth of age-0 steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the Pine River watershed, Alcona County, Michigan},
author = {Bellgraph, Brian J. and Thompson, Bradley E. and Hayes, Daniel B. and Riley, Timothy S.},
abstractNote = {We sampled ten sites within the Pine River watershed, Alcona County, Michigan. In 2001, age-0 steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were collected to determine growth rates. In 2002, emergence dates of steelhead were determined by observational studies and age-0 steelhead and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) were collected to determine growth rates. Steelhead emergence occurred from late June to mid-July 2002. Growth rates of both species varied among branches within the watershed (P<0.05). Steelhead growth varied from 0.24 to 0.42 mm/day and brook trout growth varied from 0.22 to 0.37 mm/day.},
doi = {10.1080/02705060.2006.9664131},
journal = {Journal of Freshwater Ecology, 21(4):687-692},
number = 4,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = 2006,
month =
}
  • In this study, the authors determined the conditional stability constant (log K[prime]) of copper for the gills of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss; RBT) and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis; BT). Using toxicity-based complexation bioassays, which measure the effect of competing organic ligands on copper toxicity, the RBT gill copper log K[prime] range was 6.4 to 7.2. Using a Scatchard analysis of gill Cu accumulation, the RBT log K[prime] was 7.50 and the BT log K[prime] was 7.25. The close agreement in RBT log K[prime] values between these two methods suggests that measurement of gill copper accumulation is an acceptable alternative formore » determining a toxicity-based gill copper binding affinity. The results also suggest that there is either a single gill copper binding component or, more realistically, multiple components with similar binding properties that function collectively to define a single toxicologically relevant copper conditional stability constant. These results suggest analytical approaches to measuring bioavailable metal concentrations, such as geochemical modeling where biological ligands are included in speciation calculations, may adequately simulate complex biological ligands. A method to convert gill copper accumulation to a bioavailable water criterion is also discussed.« less
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